Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report Town of Hanover, New Hampshire"

See other formats


f 
iff 



TO WN OF HANO VER 

2009 
ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 




ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
Tuesday, May 11, 2010 

Hanover High School Gymnasium 
Voting- 7:00a.m. to 7:00p.m. 
Business Meeting - 7:00 p.m. 





Hanover 25Cf Charter Commemoration 

(1761 to 2011) 

In July of 201 1 the Town of Hanover will commemorate the 250 th Anniversary of its official 
charter! Hanover, together with 1 1 other communities along the Connecticut River, can date 
its heritage back to pre-revolutionary days. These communities include Canaan, Enfield, 
Hanover, Lebanon, Lyme, Plainfield, Fairlee, Hartland, Hartford, Norwich, Thetford, and 
Windsor, and are collectively referred to as the "Middle Grant" for two reasons - they are all 
situated in the middle of New Hampshire or Vermont and they received their charters from 
Governor John Wentworth mid-way through the granting period. 

In 1 96 1 these communities worked together to commemorate the 200 Anniversary of the 
signing of their charters. Each community planned its own events which were promoted 

th 

regionally and took place throughout the summer of 1961. For the 250 Charter 
Commemoration, the same model will be followed. Each community has appointed a 
representative to serve on the regional board that is working to coordinate and support these 
events. As in 1961, each community will host a variety of local events that will be promoted 
regionally. 

Early in 2010, a group of interested Hanover citizens and members of the Recreation 
Department met to begin planning for the events of 2011. Representatives from the 
following groups came together to brainstorm: Hanover Historical Society, the Howe 
Library, Hanover Improvement Society, the Hopkins Center, the Hanover Center's Old 
Timers Fair Planning Committee, local business representatives, Dartmouth College, Youth- 
In- Action, Hanover Rotary, Hanover Lion's Club, Hanover Garden Club, and Vital 
Communities. This group hopes to grow in number and will continue to meet over the 
coming months. 

Some of Hanover's anticipated 201 1 Commemorative events include a kickoff at the Town's 
annual Muster Day Celebration on Memorial Day; a historical project with the schools; old 
fashioned activities at the Hanover Center Old Timer's Fair in June of 201 1; an exhibit at the 
Howe Library; an updated written history of Hanover looking forward from the early 1960's; 
a Pig and Wolf project; Downtown celebrations, which may include a concert, street dance, 
picnic or barbeque, or storefront contests; fireworks; Historic House Tours; and a Native 
American event. The commemoration will likely end with an expanded 4 l of July 
Celebration which will include a parade, games, food, period actors, performances, speakers, 
and contests like pie eating! 

To get involved in the planning or to volunteer at an event please contact the Parks and 
Recreation Department at 643-5315 or at Liz.Burdette@Hanovernh.org or Bill Young at 
William.W.Young@Dartmouth.edu . 

Front Cover Photo: Etna Library (Photo Credit: Doug Fraser) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Table of Contents 1 

Business Hours/Telephone Numbers/E-Mail Addresses 3 

Town Management Staff 4 

Mission Statement 4 

Chapter 1 -Information for Town Meeting 5 

Town Officers 7 

Candidates for Town Office 7 



Green Pages - Moderator's Letter Part I 

- Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting 

Yellow Pages - Explanatory Information for Town Meeting Part II 



Chapter 2 - Town Manager and Budget Reports 9 

Selectmen's Report 10 

Town Manager's Budget Report 14 

2010-2011 Budget Overview, All Funds 21 

2010-2011 Budget Summary 22 

Tax Rate Projection and History 30 

Independent Auditor's Report 33 

Statement of General Debt 42 

Trust Funds 43 

Town Treasurer's Report 44 

Hanover Finance Committee Budget Report 45 

Chapter 3 - Town Department Reports 49 

List of Hanover Employees 50 

"Milestones" (Employees with 20+ years of service) 55 

Administrative Services 56 

Assessing 56 

- Summary of Assessments 57 

Etna Library 58 

Fire Department 60 

Howe Library 62 

Human Resources 64 

Management Information Systems (MIS) 65 

Parks and Recreation 66 

Planning and Zoning 68 



Town Department Reports cont'd... 

Police Department 69 

Public Works 77 

Supervisors of Checklist 87 

Town Clerk and Tax Collector 87 

-Tax Collector's Report 89 

- Summary of Tax Lien Accounts 90 

- Ten Largest Taxpayers 90 

-Report of the Town Clerk 91 

- Vehicle Registration 92 

- Dog Licenses 92 

- Dredge and Fill Applications 92 

- Voter Registration 93 



Chapter 4-Board and Committee Reports 95 

Official Boards, Commissions and Committees List 96 

Advisory Board of Assessors Report 101 

Affordable Housing Commission 101 

Bicycle Pedestrian Committee 102 

Building Code Advisory Committee 103 

Conservation Commission 105 

Etna Library Board of Trustees 108 

Howe Library Board of Trustees 109 

Parking and Transportation Board 110 

Planning Board Ill 

Senior Citizen Advisory Committee (Hanover Senior Center) 114 

Sustainable Hanover Committee 114 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 119 

Other Agency Reports 121 

-CATV 121 

- Hanover Improvement Society 122 

- Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee 123 



Chapter 5 - Miscellaneous Information 125 

Message from Senator Matthew Houde 126 

Message from Raymond Burton, Executive Councilor 128 

2009 Summary of Legal Activity 129 

2009-2010 Rate & Fee Schedule 130 

Minutes of the Annual Town Meeting -May 12,2009 153 

Minutes of Special Town Meeting - October 27, 2009 170 



HANOVER MUNICIPAL BUSINESS TELEPHONE NUMBERS 

Ambulance, Fire, Police EMERGENCY 911 

Animal Control 643-2222 

Assessing 643-0703 

Cemetery Department 643-3327 

Community Outreach Officer 640-3219 

Etna Library 643-3116 

Finance and Administration 640-3204 

Fire Department (Non-Emergency) 643-3424 

Howe Library 643-4120 

Human Resources 640-3208 

MIS 640-3222 

Parking Division 640-3220 

Police Department/Dispatch (Non-Emergency) 643-2222 

Planning & Zoning 643-0708 

Public Works/ Highway 643-3327 

Richard W. Black Center and Parks & Recreation Department 643-53 15 

Senior Center 643-5531 

Tax Collector 640-3201 

Town Clerk 640-3200 

Town Hall Auto-Attendant 643-4123 

Town Manager 643-0701 

Water Reclamation Facility 643-2362 

Water Department 643-3439 

E-MAIL ADDRESSES 

assessor@hanovernh.org firedept@hanovernh.org recdept@hanovernh.org 

childrens.services@thehowe.org parking@hanovernh.org reference@thehowe.org 

circulation@thehowe . org planning@hanovernh.org townmgr@hanovernh.org 

dpw@hanovernh.org policedept@hanovernh.org wwtf@hanovernh . org 

etna.library@,hanovernh.org 

BUSINESS HOURS 

Dispatch -46 Lyme Rd Sun- Sat 24 hours/day 

Etna Library -130 Etna Rd., Etna Mon & Thurs 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

(Closed on Sundays) Tues 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Wed 2:00 p.m. -6:00 p.m. 

Fri 9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. 

Sat 10:00 a.m. -12:00 noon 

Fire Dept. - 48 Lyme Rd Sun -Sat 24 hours/day 

Howe Library Mon -Thurs 10:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

13 EastSouthSt. Fri 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

(Closed on Sunday during summer) Sat 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Sun 1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Parks & Recreation -48 Lebanon St Mon -Fri 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

(Closed on Saturdays from June 27 to August 22, but Sat 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

open by appointment during this time) (Open Sunday year round by appointment only) 

Police Dept. - 46 Lyme Rd Sun -Sat 24 hours/day 

Public Works Dept. - Rt. 120 Mon-Fri 7:00 a.m. - 3:30p.m. 

Senior Center - 48 Lebanon St Mon-Fri 12:30 p.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Town Hall -41 So. Main St Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Water Reclamation Facility -Rt. 10 Mon-Fri 7:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 



Town Management Staff 

Town Manager 

Julia N. Griffin 

Human Resources Director 

Myra Johnson 

Director of Administrative Services and Deputy Town Clerk 

Elizabeth "Betsy" McClain 

Director of Town Clerk's Office and Tax Collector 

Elizabeth "Liz" Meade 

Director of Assessing 

Michael Ryan 

Director of Planning and Zoning 

Jonathan Edwards 

Police Department 

Nicholas Giaccone, Chief 

Fire and Inspection Services 

Roger E. Bradley, Chief 

Library Services 

Mary H. White, Howe Library Director 

Barbara Prince, Etna Library Librarian 

Director of Parks and Recreation Department 

Henry "Hank" Tenney 

Director of Public Works Department 

Peter Kulbacki 

Wastewater Superintendent 

Kevin MacLean 



Mission Statement 

The government of the Town of Hanover exists to provide public services for all the 
citizens of Hanover. 

To this end, the mission of the management of the Town of Hanover is to provide 
guidance and direction to all town employees to: 

- provide responsive, friendly, courteous service to the public and encourage open 
communication between all citizens and all public employees and officials. 

encourage them to regularly improve their professional skills to enable them to provide 
efficient, high quality, and fiscally responsible service. 

dedicate themselves to the highest standards of ethical behavior in all dealings with the 
public and each other. 



Chapter 1 



Information 

For 
Town Meeting 



Notes... 



Town Officers 2009 



Board of Selectmen 

Brian F. Walsh, Chairman (201 1 ) 

Katherine S. Connolly, Vice Chairman (2012) 

Peter L.Christie (2011) 

Judith A. Doherty, Secretary (2012) 

AthosJ. Rassias(2010) 

Moderator 

Dan M.Nelson (2010) 

Town Clerk 

Charles Garipay (2010) 

Treasurer 

Patricia Coutermarsh (Appointed) 



Advisory Board of Assessors 

Richard W. Birnie (2012) 
Joe Roberto (2011) 
Paul F.Young (2010) 

Fence Viewers 

William F. Garrity (2010) 
Robert Morris (2010) 
Vacancy (2010) 

Health Officer 

William E. Boyle, M.D 

Library Trustees 

Chris Bentivoglio (2010) 
Jean M. Keene (2011) 
Rhonda N.S.Siegel (2012) 



Park Commissioner 

Linda Fowler (2012) 

Supervisors of Checklist 

Elaine Hawthorne (2014) 
Arlene Mahler (2012) 
Linda Mc Williams (2010) 

Surveyors of Wood and Timber 

Ed Chamberlain (2010) 
John Richardson (2010) 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Brian C.Doyle (2010) 
Paul B. Gardent (2011) 
Judson T. Pierson, Jr. (2012) 



Candidates for Town Office 



Etna Library Trustee (1) 

Elizabeth P. Storrs 



Supervisor of the Checklist (1) 

Linda Mc Williams 



Moderator (1) 

Daniel M. Nelson 

Selectman (1) 

Athos Rassias 



Town Clerk (1) 

Charles Garipay 

Trustee of Trust Funds (1) 

Brian C. Doyle 



Notes... 



Parti 



Moderator's 
Letter 



Part 1-1 



Notes. 



Part 1-2 



Moderator's Message 

ELECTIONS 

April 2010 

It has been an honor and pleasure to serve this past year as Moderator, overseeing elections and 
presiding at Town Meeting. (I recused myself from the discussion and voting about the 
Municipalization of the Hanover Water Works Company at last year's regular and special Town 
Meetings because of the connection with my responsibilities at the time as a Dartmouth College 
employee. Many thanks to my predecessors, Willy Black and Harry Bird, for their "encore" 
performances as Moderators for those deliberations.) Over the years as a resident, and especially 
now as Moderator, I am impressed by the civility on display at Town Meeting and by our 
collective desire to be well informed and to act in the best interest of the community. My only 
regret is that more of our neighbors don't attend and participate. Please don't hesitate to contact 
me if you have suggestions for improving the meeting and encouraging wider attendance. 

Sincerely, 
Dan Nelson 
13 N. Park St. 
Hanover, NH 03755 
643-0399 



TOWN MEETING 

Town Meetings have been the governmental system of most New England towns since colonial 
days. Town Meeting is a pure democracy: Voters of the Town are the legislative body and have 
all the authority and power of the legislatures in Concord and Washington. The following 
information (drawn from materials shared by previous moderators and the Town of Bow via the 
New Hampshire Local Government Center) is presented to make sure we have a shared 
understanding of our relatively simple and straightforward terminology and procedure and to 
help voters participate: 



HOW THE MEETING WORKS 

• Warrant - the agenda for the meeting 



• 



Article - An agenda item requiring action (a vote) by the Meeting. (The Moderator 
will take Articles in the order that they appear on the Warrant unless an intent to take 
the Articles out of order is announced.) 

Meeting Rules - New Hampshire law does not require Town Meetings to be run 
under Roberts Rules of Order. You, the legislative body, have final authority over 
the rules for the meeting. The Moderator employs the following general rules of 
procedure to keep order, to keep the meeting moving, and to avoid getting bogged 

Part 1-3 



• 



down in procedural quagmires. By majority vote, the voters can overrule any 
decision that the Moderator makes and any rule that the Moderator establishes. A 
voter can make such a request by raising a Point of Order. 

Voting - All votes are voice votes unless specified by law (bond votes require a 
paper ballot). If the voice vote is too close to call, the Moderator may ask for a hand 
vote. (Colored cards will be given to the voters to use for hand votes for better 
visibility in counting.) Any voter who doubts the accuracy of any non-counted vote 
may require the Moderator to determine a vote by a counted show of hands/cards or 
by a counted standing vote. 

a. In the interest of impartiality, the Moderator will not vote, except in two 
instances: to break a tie (a tie vote does not carry a motion), or if a motion he or 
she opposes could carry by one vote, the Moderator may vote against it (creating 
a tie that would defeat the motion). 

Paper ballots - On any vote, if five voters so request in writing, a paper ballot shall 
be used. (All five voters must be present and identified, and the written request must 
be presented to the Moderator prior to the end of debate on the Article or question.) 

Consideration of Articles - The Moderator will consider each Article, as follows: 

a. The Moderator will announce the Article number, and the text of the Article 
will be made available at the Meeting. The Moderator need not read the full 
text of the Article. 

b. The Moderator will recognize a member of the Board of Selectmen (or the 
petitioner, if a petitioned Article) to move the adoption of the Article. 

c. If the motion is seconded, the Moderator will recognize a member of the Board 
of Selectmen or the petitioner to explain the Article. 

d. The meeting will then debate and vote on the Article. 

Participation -Any registered Hanover voter may speak, ask questions, or give 
opinions after being recognized by the Moderator. Town Meeting is a deliberative 
session. Discussion and vigorous, civil debate is encouraged. 

a. No one may speak unless he or she has the floor. 

b. No one has the floor unless recognized by the Moderator. 

c. Everyone who speaks must use a microphone so that all attending can hear. 
Speakers should state their names. 

d. Even if a voter does not have the floor, a voter may speak to raise a Point of 
Order or to challenge the Moderator's ruling. 



Part 1-4 



e. The Moderator will allow only one motion on the floor at a time, with two 
exceptions: 

i. A voter may raise a Point of Order at any time. 

ii. A voter who has the floor may make a motion to amend the pending motion 
or to Call the Question. 

f. Motions to Call the Question limit debate and require a 2/3 vote. If passed, 
these motions stop debate and require an immediate vote on the pending motion. 
However, anyone who has already been recognized to speak will be allowed to 
do so. 

g. All speakers must be courteous and speak to the issues pending and not 
"against" individuals raising or discussing the issues. Hanover Town Meeting 
has a long and proud tradition of avoiding personal attacks and inappropriate 
language. 

h. Except for motions to Call the Question, motions and amendments must be 
submitted to the Moderator in writing so they may be accurately communicated 
to the Meeting and preserved in the record. Town staff will be happy to consult 
about wording. 

i. The Moderator will not accept negative motions, which are motions that require 
a "no" vote to vote in the affirmative, such as "I move that we not adopt the 
budget." 

j. No one who is not a registered Hanover voter may speak without permission of 
the Meeting, as confirmed by the Moderator, except that the Moderator will 
allow non-resident Town officials and consultants who are at the meeting to 
provide information about an Article to speak. 

k. All questions and comments should be addressed to the Moderator, who will 
determine who responds. 

1. With the exception of initial presentations on Articles, speakers in debate should 
limit their comments to three minutes and wait for other speakers to have their 
turn before asking to be recognized again. 

m. If the Meeting appears destined not to conclude by a reasonable hour, the 
Moderator may recess the meeting to a future date. 



Part 1-5 



Notes. 



Part 1-6 



Warrant 



for 



Town Meeting 

Tuesday, 
May 11, 2010 



Part 1-7 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



GRAFTON, ss TOWN OF HANOVER 



TO THE INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN OF HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE, who 
are qualified to vote in Town affairs: 






TAKE NOTICE AND BE WARNED, that the Annual Town Meeting of the Town of 
Hanover, New Hampshire, will be held as follows: 

ON TUESDAY, MAY 1 1, 2010 AT THE GYMNASIUM, HANOVER HIGH SCHOOL, 
LEBANON STREET, HANOVER, THERE WILL BE VOTING BY OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR 
THE ELECTION OF TOWN OFFICERS AND ALL OTHER ARTICLES REQUIRING VOTE 
BY OFFICIAL BALLOT. THE POLLS WILL OPEN AT 7:00 AM AND CLOSE AT 7:00 PM. 

ARTICLES SDC THROUGH TWENTY-FIVE WILL BE PRESENTED, DISCUSSED 
AND ACTED UPON BEGINNING AT 7:00 PM AT THE GYMNASRJM, HANOVER HIGH 
SCHOOL, LEBANON STREET, HANOVER. 

ARTICLE ONE: To vote (by nonpartisan ballot) for the following Town Officers: 

One Selectman to serve for a term of three (3) years; 

One Town Clerk to serve for a term of three (3) years; 

One Moderator to serve for a term of two (2) years; 

One Library Trustee to serve for a term of three (3) years; 

One Supervisor of the Checklist to serve for a term of six (6) years; 

One Trustee of Trust Funds to serve for a term of three (3) years. 



ARTICLE TWO (to vote by ballot): To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing Hanover 
Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board in Amendment No. 1: 

The following is on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 1 as proposed by the Hanover 
Planning Board for the Hanover Zoning Ordinance as follows?" 

Amendment No. 1 would amend Section 702 by replacing the word "preliminary" with 
the words "the Design Review phase of subdivision and site plan review. 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted 
unanimously to recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. 



Part 1-8 



ARTICLE THREE (to vote by ballot): To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing 
Hanover Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board in Amendment No. 2: 

The following is on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 2 as proposed by the Hanover 
Planning Board for the Hanover Zoning Ordinance as follows?" 

Amendment No. 2 would amend Section 803 to allow a specified limited category of 
additions to existing non-conforming structures without the need for a Special Exception. 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted 
unanimously to recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. 



ARTICLE FOUR (to vote by ballot): To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing 
Hanover Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board in Amendment No. 3: 

The following is on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 3 as proposed by the Hanover 
Planning Board for the Hanover Zoning Ordinance as follows?" 

Amendment No. 3 would amend Section 1001 to specify that abutters shall be notified of 
a pending application for a residential zoning permit. 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted 
unanimously to recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. 



ARTICLE FIVE (to vote by ballot): To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing Hanover 
Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning Board in Amendment No. 4: 

The following is on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 4 as proposed by the Hanover 
Planning Board for the Hanover Zoning Ordinance as follows?" 

Amendment No. 4 would amend Section 1006 to revise the criteria by which the Zoning 
Board of Adjustment would consider applications for variances so that these criteria are 
consistent with recent changes to State Law. 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted 
unanimously to recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. 



Part 1-9 



BUSINESS MEETING AGENDA 

7:00 PM 

ARTICLE SIX: To choose the following Town Officers to be elected by a majority vote: 

One member of the Advisory Board of Assessors for a term of three (3) years; 

Three Fence Viewers, each for a term of one (1) year; 

Two Surveyors of Wood and Timber, each for a term of one (1) year; 

Such other Officers as the Town may judge necessary for managing its affairs. 



ARTICLE SEVEN: To receive reports from the Selectmen, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Collector of 
Taxes and other Town Officers and to vote on any motion relating to these reports and to receive 
any special resolutions that may be appropriate and to vote thereon. 

A motion will be made to approve Article Eight through Article Thirteen jointly as written, 
however anyone is free to discuss any part of these articles and may move for separate 
action on any one article. 



ARTICLE EIGHT: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $6,650 for deposit into 
the Land and Capital Improvements Fund, and to authorize funding of this amount by transfer 
from the Land Use Change Tax Reserve, with no funds being raised by taxation. The amount 
appropriated is the equivalent of 50% of the total collected in the Land Use Change Tax Reserve 
in the fiscal year 2008-2009. Funding deposited into the Land and Capital Improvements Fund 
derives from 50% of the land use change tax proceeds, paid by property owners when they take 
land out of current use. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE NINE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $6,650 for deposit into 
the Conservation Fund created as authorized by RSA 36-A:5.1, and to authorize funding of this 
amount by transfer from the Land Use Change Tax Reserve, with no funds being raised by 
taxation. The amount appropriated is the equivalent of 50% of the total collected in the Land Use 
Change Tax Reserve in the fiscal year 2008-2009. Funding deposited into the Conservation Fund 
derives from 50% of the land use change tax proceeds, paid by property owners when they take 
land out of current use. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE TEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $34,660 for deposit into 
the Municipal Transportation Improvement Fund, and to authorize funding of this amount by 
transfer from the Transportation Improvement Fee Reserve, with no funds being raised by 
taxation. This amount is equivalent to the total Transportation Fee surcharge received for each 
motor vehicle registered in the Town of Hanover ($5.00 per vehicle) during fiscal year 2008- 
2009. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 

Part I- 10 



ARTICLE ELEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $1,145,740 and 
authorize payment into existing capital reserve funds in the following amounts for the purposes 
for which such funds were established: 

Ambulance Equipment Capital Reserve Fund $ 47,000 

Bridge Replacement and Renovation Capital Reserve 

Fund $ 40,000 

Building Maintenance and Improvement Capital Reserve 

Fund $ 50,000 

Dispatch Equipment and Dispatch Center Enhancements 

and Capital Reserve Fund $ 6,500 

Fire Department Vehicle and Equipment Capital Reserve 

Fund $ 65,000 

Highway Construction and Maintenance Equipment 

Capital Reserve Fund $249,600 

Parking Operations Vehicles and Parking Facility 

Improvements Capital Reserve Fund $ 62,210 

Police Vehicles and Equipment Capital Reserve Fund $ 73,000 

Road Construction and Improvements Capital Reserve 

Fund $ 10,000 

Sewer Equipment and Facilities Improvements Capital 

Reserve Fund $527,430 

Town Revaluation Capital Reserve Fund $ 15,000 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE TWELVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $2,135,134 for the 
purposes listed below, and to authorize funding these amounts by withdrawal from the listed 
capital reserve funds in the following amounts: 

Bridge Replacement and Renovation Capital Reserve 
Fund 

River Road and/or Ruddsboro Road bridge 
repair $ 95,000 

Highway Construction and Maintenance Equipment 
Capital Reserve Fund 

Backhoe loader, loader, truck with plow $ 300,100 

Howe Library Building Repair and Equipment Capital 
Reserve Fund 

Portion of migration costs to open source library 

information system $ 20,034 

Sewer Equipment and Facilities Improvements Capital 

Reserve Fund $ 1 ,700,000 

Town Revaluation Capital Reserve Fund 

Contracted labor for Town-wide property 

revaluation program $ 20,000 

This will be a non-lapsing appropriation per RSA 32:7, VI and will not lapse until these 
purchases are complete or June 30, 2015, whichever is sooner. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



Part I- 11 



ARTICLE THIRTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $29,950 for up to 
$22,950 of signal and pedestrian improvements at the Lyme Road and North Park Street 
intersection and for general improvements up to $7,000 proposed by the Bike and Pedestrian 
Committee, and to fund this appropriation by authorizing the withdrawal of this sum from the 
Municipal Transportation Improvement Fund. This will be a non-lapsing appropriation per RSA 
32:7, VA and will not lapse until these improvements are complete or June 30, 2015, whichever 
is sooner. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



END OF ARTICLES PROPOSED TO BE JOINTLY VOTED ON. 



ARTICLE FOURTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $19,760,540 to 
pay the operating expenses of the Town for the 2010-2011 fiscal year, for the purposes set forth 
in the Town budget. This sum does not include the funds voted in any of the preceding or 
succeeding articles. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE FIFTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to approve the cost items contained in the 
collective bargaining agreement approved by the Board of Selectmen on June 22, 2009, between 
the Town of Hanover and the New England Police Benevolent Association (NEPBA), Local 27, 
which calls for the following increases in total compensation for its members: 

Year Estimated Increase 

2009-2010 $36,979 

2010-2011 $32,423 

And further to raise and appropriate the sum of $32,423 for the 2010-201 1 fiscal year, such sum 
representing the additional cost attributable to the increase in total compensation over the 
appropriation at current staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal year and which became effective in 
July, 2009. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



Part 1-12 



ARTICLE SIXTEEN: To sec if the Town will vote to approve the cost items contained in the 
collective bargaining agreement approved by the Board of Selectmen on June 22, 2009, between 
the Town of Hanover and the International Association of Firefighters (IAFF), Local 328X, 
which calls for the following increases in total compensation for its members: 

Year Estimated Increase 

2009-2010 $22,022 

2010-2011 $20,775 

And further to raise and appropriate the sum of $20,775 for the 2010-201 1 fiscal year, such sum 
representing the additional cost attributable to the increase in total compensation over the 
appropriation at current staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal year, and which became effective 
in December, 2009. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE SEVENTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the purchase of a 9.4 acre 
parcel known as the Hayes property in Etna Village, Tax Map 29, Lot 12, off Etna Road, upon 
which the Etna Library currently resides, for the purchase price of $360,000, and to raise and 
appropriate that sum for this purpose as follows: 

a. $190,000 by authorizing the withdrawal of that amount from the Land and Capital 
Improvements Fund; 

b. $84,000 by withdrawal from the Conservation Fund; 

c. $128,000by private donations . 

And further to permanently protect 4.2 acres of that property through the establishment of a 
conservation easement and management plan for that portion of the property, to be approved by 
the Conservation Commission, the Board of Selectmen and the Hanover Conservation Council, 
with the conservation easement to be conveyed to the Hanover Conservation Council. 

No funds raised in this article will come from taxation. This will be a non-lapsing appropriation 
per RSA 32:7, VI and will not lapse until this purchase is complete or June 30, 2015, whichever 
occurs sooner. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE EIGHTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to permanently protect 12.9 acres known 
as the Trescott Ridge Wetlands, Tax Map 5, Lot 46, 1 1 Woodcock Lane, and adjacent to the 
Hayes Property, through the creation of a conservation easement and management plan to be 
approved by the Conservation Commission, the Board of Selectmen, and the Hanover 
Conservation Council and to be conveyed to the Hanover Conservation Council. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 

Part 1-13 



ARTICLE NINETEEN: To see if the Town will raise and appropriate up to $220,000 for the 
purpose of acquiring the Steele Property, Tax Map 8, Lot 2, on Route 10, and to fund this 
appropriation by authorizing withdrawal of this sum from the Conservation Fund, with no funds 
being raised by taxation. And further to permanently protect this 6 acre parcel through the 
establishment of a conservation easement and management plan to be approved by the 
Conservation Commission, the Board of Selectmen and the Hanover Conservation Council, with 
the conservation easement to be conveyed to the Hanover Conservation Council. 

This will be a non-lapsing appropriation per RSA 32:7, VI and will not lapse until this purchase 
is complete or June 30, 2015, whichever occurs sooner. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE TWENTY: To see if the Town will vote to permanently protect the 17. 6 acre Rinker 
Tract, Tax Map 8, Lot 4, on Route 10 and adjacent to the Steele Property, through the creation of 
a conservation easement and management plan to be approved by the Conservation Commission, 
the Board of Selectmen, and the Hanover Conservation Council and to be conveyed to the 
Hanover Conservation Council. 

Selectmen For 5 Against Absent 



ARTICLE TWENTY-ONE: (Article submitted by petition) To see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate $3,410 to support the services provided for the residents of Hanover by the 
Outreach House. This is the third year this article has appeared on the warrant. 



ARTICLE TWENTY-TWO: (Article submitted by petition) To see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate $2,500 to support the services provided for the residents of Hanover by 
ACoRN. 



ARTICLE TWENTY-THREE: (Article submitted by petition) To see if the Town will vote to 
affirm our state constitution's guarantee that all persons are "equally free and independent". We 
therefore strongly affirm the new marriage equality law, which promises equal freedom, dignity 
and respect for all our citizens. We also strongly condemn the efforts by some to repeal the new 
marriage law and enshrine discrimination in our constitution, all in order to deny our fellow 
citizens the fundamental right of equality to which we are all entitled. We direct the Board of 
Selectmen to report the passage of this warrant to the clerks of the State House of 
Representatives and the Senate, to each of our State Representatives, to our State Senator and to 
Governor Lynch. 



Part 1-14 



ARTICLE TWENTY-FOUR: (Article submitted by petition) To see if the Town will vote to 
affirm the following: 

Shall New Hampshire's Congressional Delegation be instructed to pursue a new and independent 
investigation to address thoroughly all of the evidence and unanswered questions related to the 
events of September 11, 2001? 



ARTICLE TWENTY-FIVE: To transact any other business that may legally be brought before 
this Town Meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of the Town of Hanover this 5 th day of April, 2010. 

TOWN OF HANOVER 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Brian F. Walsh, Chairman 
Katherine S. Connolly 
Peter L. Christie 
Judith A. Doherty 
Athos J. Rassias 



Part 1-15 



Notes... 



Part 1-16 



Part II 



Explanatory 
Information 



Part II- 1 



Notes... 



Part II-2 



Youth-In-Action Child Care for Town Meeting 
Tuesday, May 11,2010 

YIA will be offering child care from 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. the night of 
Hanover Town Meeting. Families must pre-register for this service by 
Friday, May 7 th , 2010. 

Please pre-register by e-mailing Jessica Eakin at via^dresden.us or by 
calling her at 643-4313. 



Chapter 1: Information for Town Meeting 
Part II: Explanatory Information 



What is Town Meeting? All Hanover citizens are encouraged to participate in the yearly Town 
Meeting, a living example of direct democracy. Town Meeting is a meeting of citizens who 
come together to form the legislative body of the town. It is held yearly, the second Tuesday in 
May, to elect town officers, adopt the town budget, and consider other issues that require Town 
Meeting approval. This year, Town Meeting will be held on May 1 1 th . 

What is the Warrant? The Town Meeting agenda is called "the Warrant"; each agenda item is 
called an "article". The official Warrant precedes this document in Part I. The Warrant includes 
two sets of articles: 

1. Ballot voting (Articles One through Five): Voting on Articles One through Five - 
which includes voting for candidates for office and for amendments to the 
Hanover Zoning Ordinance - is conducted by ballot during the day of Town 
Meeting (Tuesday, May 11, 2010) from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm, in the Hanover High 
School Gymnasium. The daytime ballot voting is held by secret ballot, referred to 
as the "Australian Ballot" or the "Official Ballot". 

2. Business meeting (Articles Five through Twenty-Five): Discussion of and voting 
on Articles Five through Twenty-Five - including the proposed budget in Article 
Fourteen takes place at an open meeting, called the "Business Meeting", which 
begins at 7:00 pm on Tuesday, May 11 th , in the Hanover High School 
Gymnasium. At the Business Meeting portion of Town Meeting, citizens sit 
down together and discuss, modify, and vote. 

What if you cannot attend? If you cannot attend Town Meeting. . . 

1. Ballot items: You may vote by absentee ballot on the items decided by 
Australian or Official Ballot voting by requesting an absentee ballot from the 
Town Clerk's office at Town Hall, and delivering it in person by 5:00 pm the day 

Part II-3 



before Town Meeting or postmarked by mail by 5:00 pm on the day of Town 
Meeting. 

2. Business Meeting items: You must be present, however, to vote on or contribute 
to discussion of any Warrant items to be discussed at the Business Meeting. By 
state law, no absentee balloting is allowed on these items. 

How can you register to vote? To become a registered voter, you must be a U.S. citizen, 
eighteen years or older, and a Hanover resident. Information that must be provided at 
registration includes name, address (mailing and legal residence), place and date of birth, and 
proof of citizenship. You may register: (1) at the polls on Town Meeting day, May 1 l l ; or (2) in 
advance at the Town Clerk's Office in Town Hall up to ten days before the election; or (3) with 
the Supervisors of the Checklist whose public voter registration sessions are advertised before 
any election. 

What is explained in the rest of this chapter? The rest of this chapter, prepared by the Town 
staff, provides an explanation of all of the articles in the Warrant. The official Warrant precedes 
this document on page 1-7. 



Ballot Voting 
Articles One - Five 

Voting on Articles One through Five will be conducted by official ballot on Tuesday, May 11, 
2010 from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm in the Gymnasium of Hanover High School. 

Article One: Election of Town Officers 

The Selectmen, so named because members are selected on Town Meeting day, govern the 
Town and perform most of the Town's legislative functions as prescribed in the Town 
Charter, outside the legislative role granted voters at Town Meeting by state law. One 
position, currently held by Athos Rassias, is to be filled in 2010 for a three-year term. Athos 
Rassias has filed for re-election. 

The Town Clerk is responsible for overseeing the implementation of all elections and also 
performs in an official legal capacity, responsible for several areas of Town administration. 
Charles Garipay, the current Town Clerk, is seeking re-election to a three-year term. 

The Town Moderator oversees all elections and also presides over the business portion of 
Town Meeting. Daniel Nelson, the current Moderator, is seeking re-election to a three year 
term. 

Both the Howe Library and the Etna Library are Town-supported. Each has a Board of 
Trustees which governs the respective library in areas of fundraising and some program 
functions, but they are elected differently based on the type of organization originally 
established. The Howe Library Trustees are elected by members of the Howe Corporation 
which is a private non-profit corporation. The Etna Library, which is the original Town 
Library, is governed by the Etna Library Trustees who are elected by Town Meeting for a 

Partn-4 



three-year term. One Etna Library Trustee is up for election and the incumbent, Chris 
Bentivoglio, has decided not to seek re-election. Elizabeth P. Storrs has filed for the 
position. 

The Supervisors of the Checklist are legally responsible for overseeing the voter 
registration and certification process and for maintaining the updated voter checklist. The 
term of one Supervisor position expires this year and the incumbent, Linda McWilliams, is 
seeking re-election to another six year term. 

The Trustees of Trust Funds oversee the funds reserved for special purposes, and their 
responsibilities are governed by state statute. One Trustee position is up for election and the 
incumbent Trustee, Brian Doyle, has filed for re-election to a three-year term. 



Note: The following Articles Two through Five are Amendments No. 1 - 4 to the 
Hanover Zoning Ordinance, which must be approved by Town Meeting. All of the 
proposed amendments to the Zoning Ordinance have been approved by the 
Planning Board. 



Article Two: Amendment No. 1 — Section 702 Reference to Site Plan and Subdivision 
Design Review 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted unanimously to 
recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. The full text of this amendment is 
included in Appendix A, which follows this section of the Town Report. 

One of the goals of a comprehensive amendment to Section 702 in 2008 was to set up a new 
procedure by which an applicant, the Conservation Commission, and the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment (or the Zoning Administrator for minor projects) could have assurance that the plans 
they review for an application for a Wetlands or Waterbody Special Exception (or for an 
Administrative Permit) would at least schematically be acceptable to the Planning Board under 
criteria governing subdivisions and site plans. After a Special Exception or Administrative 
Permit is granted a case then goes to the Planning Board for Final Subdivision Review or Final 
Site Plan Review. This new procedure has eliminated most of the previous "bouncing" back and 
forth between the ZBA and the Planning Board, as one board or the other caused plan revisions 
to be made. This amendment is to clarify that it is the Design Review phase of preliminary 
subdivision or site plan review that is relevant to this procedure. 

Article Three: Amendment No. 2 — Section 803 Expansion of Non-Conforming Structures 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted unanimously to 
recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. The full text of this amendment is 
included in Appendix A, which follows this section of the Town Report. 

Special Exceptions for non-conforming structures, requested under Section 803, require approval 
of the Zoning Board of Adjustment. Although the objective guidelines are quite specific, the 

Part II-5 



requests are rarely denied. In previous years the Zoning Board has requested Planning and 
Zoning Department staff to research whether the Zoning Ordinance could be amended to allow 
the majority of these requests under this section to be handled administratively. 

This amendment would allow the expansion of an existing structure that is non-conforming only 
by intruding into a required setback, if the expansion is: 

■ No farther into the setback area than any portion of the existing structure, 

■ No closer to an abutting structure than any portion of the existing structure, and 

■ No higher than the existing structure. 

Any other expansion of a non-conforming structure into a setback would still require Zoning 
Board of Adjustment review. 

Article Four: Amendment No. 3 — Section 1001 Notice to Abutters of Pending Residential 
Zoning Permit 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted unanimously to 
recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. The full text of this amendment is 
included in Appendix A, which follows this section of the Town Report. 

Before virtually any project can be issued a Building Permit and can begin construction, the 
owner must apply for and the Town must issue a Zoning Permit, thereby assuring that the project 
complies with the Zoning Ordinance. Our Zoning Ordinance presently requires public posting of 
a Zoning Permit for a fifteen-day period, during which its issuance may be appealed. There is no 
State Law requirement for notifying abutters of the submission of an application for a zoning 
permit of any kind. Although only two zoning permits have been appealed, and unsuccessfully 
so, out of approximately 3,500 issued over the past twelve years, some citizens have expressed 
the view that abutters should be notified that a neighbor has applied for a Zoning Permit. 

In response to these criticisms, two years ago the Planning and Zoning Department began an 
administrative practice of notifying abutters by mail and having a placard posted on the property 
when an application for a Zoning Permit for a residential property is submitted. The only 
exception is for cases where the proposal has been subject to a public hearing by the Zoning 
Board or the Planning Board, because the abutters will have already received notice of the 
pending project. This amendment to Section 1001.3 would require that some form of abutter 
notice be carried out, without prescribing the means and methods of doing so. 

Article Five: Amendment No. 4 - Section 1006 Update of Variance Criteria 

At a public hearing held on February 9, 2010, the Hanover Planning Board voted unanimously to 
recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. The full text of this amendment is 
included in Appendix A, which follows this section of the Town Report. 

In its efforts to clarify the conditions under which a variance may be granted, the New 
Hampshire legislature amended RSA 674:33, 1(b) at its latest session. As a result the language of 
our Zoning Ordinance no longer conforms to the statute. This amendment simply removes our 
current variance language and replaces it with the wording of the revised statute. 



Part II-6 



Business Meeting Voting 
Articles Six through Twenty-Five 



Article Six: Election of Additional Town Officers 

This article includes election of additional Town Officers that do not need to be elected by 
written ballot. The officials are: 

One member of the Advisory Board of Assessors for a term of three (3) years. The 
Advisory Board of Assessors reviews requests for property abatements and makes 
recommendations for resolution to the Board of Selectmen. 

Three Fence Viewers, each for a term of one (1) year. The Fence Viewers, dating back 
to the colonial era, are available to adjudicate property line disputes. 

Two Surveyors of Wood and Timber, each for a term of one (1) year. The Surveyors 
of Wood and Timber also date back to the colonial era, and are elected to adjudicate 
disputes regarding the sufficiency of a delivered cord of wood. While no longer utilized, 
many New Hampshire towns still elect Surveyors to maintain this colonial tradition. 

Article Seven: Resolutions 

During consideration of this article, the Parks and Recreation Board will read a resolution 
honoring the Recreation Volunteer of the Year. 

A motion will be made to approve Article Eight through Article Thirteen jointly as written, 
however anyone is free to discuss any part of these articles and may move for separate 
action on any one article. 

Article Eight: Distribution of Revenue into the Land and Capital Improvements Fund 

The 1999 Town Meeting voted to create a Land and Capital Improvements Fund and a 
Conservation Fund, and then annually to consider taking the proceeds from the preceding fiscal 
year's Land Use Change Tax and distributing one-half to the Land and Capital Improvements 
Fund and one-half to the Conservation Fund. This article distributes one-half of the Land Use 
Change Tax revenue from the fiscal year 2008-2009 into the Land and Capital Improvements 
Fund. The Land and Capital Improvements Fund can be utilized to purchase land for Town 
facilities or to assist in the construction or renovation of Town facilities, and has a current 
unencumbered balance of roughly $183,500, prior to action on this or any other article on this 
warrant. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Nine: Distribution of Revenue into the Conservation Fund 

Mirroring the action in the preceding warrant article, this article distributes one-half of the fiscal 
year 2008-2009 Land Use Change Tax revenue into the Conservation Fund. This fund can be 

Part II-7 



utilized to purchase conservation land, conservation easements, or to implement land 
conservation-related activities. The current balance in this Fund is roughly $502,400, prior to 
action on this or any other article on this warrant. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Ten: Transfer of Funds Collected into the Municipal Transportation Improvement 
Fund 

State statute enables New Hampshire communities to establish a Municipal Transportation 
Improvement Fund, pursuant to RSA 261:153 VI. Such a fund is created by adopting a motor 
vehicle registration surcharge of up to $5.00, which is collected each time a motor vehicle is 
registered within the municipality. Town Meeting voted to collect the additional $5.00 surcharge 
at the May 2000 Town Meeting, as well as to establish the Municipal Transportation 
Improvement Fund. Proceeds from the Fund are to be used to support eligible local 
transportation improvement projects such as public transportation initiatives, roadway 
improvements, signal upgrades, and the development of bicycle and pedestrian paths. This article 
authorizes the transfer of this surcharge collected in fiscal year 2008-2009 into the Municipal 
Transportation Improvement Fund. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Eleven: Payment into Capital Reserve Funds 

This article appropriates and authorizes the payment of monies into various Capital Reserve 
Funds. All of these actions are taken as part of the recommended budget for fiscal year 2010- 
201 1. The Town has a history of making regular, annual contributions to these various funds and 
then, as required, expending monies from the funds to replace vehicles and equipment, or for 
other stipulated purposes of the fund. 

Ambulance Equipment Capital Reserve Fund $ 47,000 

Bridge Replacement and Renovation Capital 

Reserve Fund $ 40,000 

Building Maintenance and Improvement Capital 

Reserve Fund $ 50,000 

Dispatch Equipment and Dispatch Center 

Enhancements and Capital Reserve Fund $ 6,500 

Fire Department Vehicle and Equipment Capital 

Reserve Fund $ 65,000 

Highway Construction and Maintenance Equipment 

Capital Reserve Fund $249,600 

Parking Operations Vehicles and Parking Facility 

Improvements Capital Reserve Fund $ 62,210 

Police Vehicles and Equipment Capital Reserve 

Fund $ 73,000 

Road Construction and Improvements Capital 

Reserve Fund $ 10,000 

Part II-8 



Sewer Equipment and Facilities Improvements 

Capital Reserve Fund $527,430 

Town Revaluation Capital Reserve Fund $ 15,000 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Twelve: Withdrawals from Capital Reserve Funds 

There are several Capital Reserve Funds established to smooth out the budget impact of 
purchases of significant pieces of equipment and vehicles. The previous warrant article 
authorizes the deposit into these several funds; this warrant article authorizes the withdrawal 
from the specified Capital Reserve Funds for purchases of equipment and vehicles, or for other 
stipulated purposes of the Fund. 

Bridge Replacement and Renovation Capital 
Reserve Fund 

River Road and/or Ruddsboro Road bridge 

repair $ 95,000 

Highway Construction and Maintenance Equipment 
Capital Reserve Fund 

Backhoe loader, loader, truck with plow $ 300,100 

Howe Library Building Repair and Equipment 
Capital Reserve Fund 

Portion of migration costs to open source 

library information system $ 20,034 

Sewer Equipment and Facilities Improvements 

Capital Reserve Fund $ 1 ,700,000 

Town Revaluation Capital Reserve Fund 

Contracted labor for Town-wide property 

revaluation program $ 20,000 

This will be a non-lapsing appropriation per RSA 32:7, VI and will not lapse until these 
purchases are complete or June 30, 2015, whichever is sooner. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Thirteen: Appropriation of Funds for Replacement Signal at Lyme Road and North 
Park Street 

The Board of Selectmen proposes to use $29,950 from the Municipal Transportation 
Improvement Fund to help: 1) defray the cost (up to $22,950) of the signal and pedestrian 
upgrades to be completed at the Lyme Road and North Park Street intersection; and 2) to provide 
nominal funding ($7,000) for various projects proposed by the Bike and Pedestrian Committee. 
The antiquated traffic signal at the Lyme and North Park location is in extremely poor condition 
and needs immediate replacement. The Town is holding $145,000 in funds provided by 
Dartmouth College as a developer fee paid for the Planning Board approval of the new 
dormitories constructed on Maynard Street several years ago and these funds, combined with the 

Part II-9 



appropriation of $22,950 will provide for full replacement of the signal devices, the controller 
and pedestrian crossing devices to insure proper functioning of the signal system and to enable 
pedestrians to more safely cross this intersection. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

END OF ARTICLES PROPOSED TO BE JOINTLY VOTED ON. 

Article Fourteen: Proposed Municipal Budget for Fiscal Year 2010-2011 

Given the significant economic downturn which has impacted the national, state and regional 
economy over the past 1 8 months, the Board of Selectmen directed Town staff to create a draft 
budget for FY20 10-20 11 with spending options that would result in a General Fund tax rate 
increase in the 0-4% range. Town staff then crafted a draft budget that provided the Board with 
multiple spending options while maintaining essential service levels and meeting the Town's 
contractual obligations with the AFSCME (Public Works) bargaining unit and the tentative 
agreements reached with the Police and Fire bargaining units. On March 8, 2010, the Board of 
Selectmen adopted a recommended budget for the Town requiring a 0.3% General Fund tax rate 
increase. 

The table below outlines the net appropriation required by this warrant article, which when 
added to the three previous warrant articles outlined above as well as the two union contract 
articles immediately following this warrant article, funds the Town's total budget for the fiscal 
year 2010-2011. 

Appropriation for the Proposed Municipal Budget for FY 20 1 0-20 1 1 ^ Q _ „ _ . n 

(Warrant Article #14) 5>iy,/bU,MU 

Appropriation for Payment into Various Capital Reserve Funds (Warrant $ 1,145,740 

Article #11) 

Appropriation for Purchases to be Funded from Withdrawals from Various ^ ....... 

Capital Reserve Funds (Warrant Article #12) 

Appropriation from Municipal Transportation Improvement Fund (Warrant e 0Q Q<n 
Article #13) 

Appropriation for FY 20 1 0-20 1 1 Impact of Union Negotiations with Police ^ » _ .. , 
Department (Warrant Article #15) ' 

Appropriation for FY 20 1 0-20 1 1 Impact of Union Negotiations with Fire ^ on 775 

Department (Warrant Article #16) 

Grand Total of All Funds - See Budget Overview on page 21 (note: $1 <c?t i ?4 sfi? 

difference due to rounding) 



The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Part 11-10 



Article Fifteen: Union Contract Ratification with New England Police Benevolent 
Association 

The Town completed negotiations with Local 27 of the New England Police Benevolent 
Association (NEPBA) in June of 2009. NEPBA Local 27 represents employees of the Police 
Department including Police Officers, Dispatch staff and Parking Enforcement staff. The 
negotiations were protracted, extending beyond the expiration of the last contract on June 30, 
2008, due to an initial failure to reach agreement on cost-of-living adjustments offset by 
increased employee co-payments for health insurance. 

The new contract includes a 1% wage scale adjustment retroactive to July 1, 2009 to reflect 
when agreement was reached, a 3.0% wage scale adjustment effective July 15, 2009 to "catch 
up" bargaining unit member salaries with the increase other Town employees received on July 1, 
2008 (but with no retroactivity to that date), and a 3% wage scale adjustment effective July 1, 
2010. These adjustments are the same as those included in the contract with AFSCME (Public 
Works) staff approved at Town Meeting in May 2008 and granted to the Town's non-union 
employees. The wage scale adjustments in the contract are determined by the December 
Consumer Price Index for the Northeast Urban Index, size B/C communities, with a minimum 
adjustment of 1.0% and a maximum of 3.0%. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Sixteen: Union Contract Ratification with International Association of Firefighters 

The Town has completed negotiations with Local 3288 of the International Association of 
Firefighters (IAFF), which represents employees of the Fire Department. The negotiations were 
protracted, extending beyond the expiration of the last contract on June 30, 2008 due to an initial 
failure to reach agreement on cost-of-living adjustments offset by increased employee co- 
payments for health insurance. 

The new contract includes a 3% wage scale adjustment retroactive to December 18, 2009 to 
reflect when agreement was reached, a 1% wage scale adjustment effective July 15, 2009 to 
"catch up" bargaining unit member salaries with the increase other Town employees received on 
July 1, 2008 (but with no retroactivity to that date), and a 3% wage scale adjustment effective 
July 1, 2010. These adjustments are the same as those included in the contract with AFSCME 
(Public Works) staff approved at Town Meeting in May 2008 and granted to the Town's non- 
union employees. The wage scale adjustments in the contract are determined by the December 
Consumer Price Index for the Northeast Urban Index, size B/C communities, with a minimum 
adjustment of 1.0% and a maximum of 3.0%. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Seventeen: Purchase of the Hayes Property in Etna Village - Site of the Etna 
Library - Utilizing Three Sources of Funds and Permanent Protection of 4.2 Acres of the 
Property 

The Etna Library (formally known as the Hanover Town Library) and the land directly under the 
footprint of the building are owned by the Town of Hanover but the land surrounding the Library 

Part 11-11 



building has long been owned by the Hayes family, along with the larger 1 1 .4 acre parcel that 
includes the Hayes home, barns and pasture land. A deed restriction has been in place since the 
Library was constructed requiring that the building be used for Library purposes only; should the 
Town cease to use the building as a Library, the building and land upon which it sits would 
revert to the owner of the larger Hayes parcel. 

The Town has long held a desire to secure the property immediately surrounding the Hayes 
property to gain ultimate control of the building itself and to enable construction of a safer 
parking area immediately behind the building and to enable construction of a fully handicap 
accessible entrance and restroom at the rear of the property. The current parking situation along 
Etna Road is not safe and the building is not handicap accessible. During Mrs. Hayes life, the 
Town inquired about her willingness to subdivide the parcel so that the Town could purchase the 
land underneath and surrounding the Library for this purpose, but she was not interested in 
pursuing that option. 

Upon her death in 2009, Mrs. Hayes' daughters began discussions with the Town about the 
potential for purchase of the bulk of the property as an opportunity to: 1) secure the land 
immediately surrounding the Library for construction of the improvements outlined above; 2) 
eliminate the deed restriction governing the "sole purpose" use of the building, even though there 
is no intention to cease using the building for library purposes; 3) secure the pasture land for a 
combination of future recreation use and conservation; and, 4) preserve the historic village farm 
qualities of this lovely parcel. The Hayes' daughters were most open to discussing these 
opportunities as a means of preserving the family farm they have known all their lives. 
Discussions led to a decision to pursue subdivision of the farmhouse, barns and 2 acres of land so 
that the home could be sold for what the family hopes will be preservation and renovation, and to 
leave the remaining 9.4 acre parcel intact in the hopes that the Town could combine funding 
sources to enable its purchase. That subdivision, which includes a requirement that the deed 
restriction governing the use of the Etna Library be extinguished, was approved by the Planning 
Board on April 6, 2010. The Hayes' sisters have offered to sell the 9.4 acre parcel to the Town 
for $360,000. 

Toward that end, Article Seventeen seeks permission of Town Meeting to purchase the property 
and to utilize three different sources of funds for that purpose. If adopted, the Town hopes to 
purchase the property on or about July 1, 2010. Specifically, the article: 

• Seeks Town Meeting authorization to purchase the property. 

• Seeks an appropriation of funds from the Town's Land and Capital Improvements Fund, 
which is the accumulation of 50% of the proceeds from payment of the Land Use Change 
Tax collected over the last several years. The purpose of this fund is for the purchase of 
land and/or for construction of or improvements to Town-owned facilities. The most 
recent large expenditure from this fund was used to help fund construction of the Richard 
W. Black Community Center. A total of approximately $190,000 is available in the fund 
and the Town proposes to appropriate the full amount to help purchase the Hayes 
property. 

• Seeks an appropriation of funds from the Town's Conservation Fund, which is the 
accumulation of the remaining 50% of the proceeds from payment of the Land Use 
Change Tax, is governed by the Conservation Commission. Expenditure of more than 
$50,000 from the Conservation Fund requires approval by the Board of Selectmen and 
Town Meeting, based on a Memorandum of Understanding executed between the 

Part 11-12 



Commission and the Board of Selectmen. Given that the upper 4.2 acres of the Hayes 
property directly abuts the 12.9 acre Trescott Ridge Wetlands parcel which was set aside 
as open space as part of the related residential subdivision constructed in that location 
many years ago, the Town and Commission seek to conserve both tracts of land. Toward 
that end, the Conservation Commission has agreed to provide funding in the amount of 
$55,000 toward the purchase of the Hayes property. 
• Seeks an appropriation of the $1 15,000 in remaining funds needed to acquire the Hayes' 
property which will be raised through a Town-wide fundraising campaign. The hope is 
to seek a lead donor for the purchase and to implement a brief fundraising campaign to 
begin in mid-May if Town Meeting approves the purchase of the property. 

Article Seventeen also seeks to permanently protect a 4.2 acre portion of the property. With the 
active recreation and library related-uses envisioned for the area of the Hayes property closest to 
the road, the dedication of the back 4.2 acres for conservation and more passive recreation uses 
nicely complements the more active uses being considered for the lower portion of the property. 
This effort to provide passive recreational opportunities broadens the range of Hanover's outdoor 
enthusiasts that will appreciate the Hayes property. 

The back portion of the Hayes property abuts the Trescott Ridge Wetlands, given to the Town in 
1971 at the same time adjoining lands were subdivided for house lots. Contiguity of open space 
is beneficial for wildlife and for natural resources that do not follow property boundaries. The 
Conservation Commission would like to add the back portion of the Hayes property to the 
Town's system of open spaces to reinforce and provide a broader variety of habitat for the 
Trescott Ridge Wetlands. The back portion of the Hayes property includes both forest and open 
meadow. In addition, the property is featured in the 2000 Open Space Priorities Plan as a 
location for a trail to increase the recreation opportunities in Etna Village. Indeed, with the 
purchase of the Hayes property, a trail on Town-owned land can be created connecting the center 
of Etna Village to the Trescott Ridge Wetlands. 

Neither zoning nor ownership permanently protects conservation land. Consistent with the 
recommendation in the Open Space Priorities Plan and the Master Plan that the town work with 
a land trust to devise a conservation easement to permanently protect each Town-owned 
conservation parcel, the Commission has begun work with the Hanover Conservation Council, a 
local non-profit conservation organization founded in 1963. The Council will ensure that the use 
limitations of agriculture, forestry, conservation and low impact recreation are permanently 
respected. From a management point of view it is appropriate to protect this land at the same 
time as the Trescott Ridge Wetlands property. The Conservation Commission, the Board of 
Selectmen and the Hanover Conservation Council will jointly approve both the management plan 
and the conservation easement prior to transferring the easement to the Council. 

There will be additional costs involved in the completion of future improvements to both the 
Etna Library building itself and in related infrastructure, including an access driveway, parking 
lot to the rear of the building, and additional recreation amenities. Toward that end, the Town has 
submitted a Letter of Intent to the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic 
Development, Land and Water Conservation Fund Program, indicating an intention to apply for 
up to $100,000 in matching funds in October of 2010 toward the construction of an access 
driveway, small parking lot and pocket park immediately behind the Etna Library. The Town 
must provide a one-for-one match for LWCF monies, but may use a soft match to do so. Soft 
match can include Town labor and materials. The intention is to engage in a planning process 

Part 11-13 



with the Etna community later this summer to refine a plan for improvements to the Etna Library 
itself, parking, pocket park amenities and a potential playing field so that we may refine a formal 
application for LWCF funds in October of 20 1 0, and then return to Town Meeting in May of 
201 1 with a final plan for implementation. Additional fundraising will, no doubt, be needed to 
implement specific improvements to the Library itself and for potential construction of a playing 
field. 

A map showing the Hayes property is attached as Appendix B. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Eighteen: Permanent Protection of the Trescott Ridge Wetlands 

Permanently protecting the back portion of the Hayes property means that uses on those 4.2 acres 
will be limited to agriculture, forestry, conservation and recreation and will complement the 
existing use and permanent protection of the Trescott Ridge Wetlands. Contiguity of protected 
open space is beneficial for wildlife and for natural resources that do not follow property 
boundaries. The Trescott Ridge wetlands, a 12.9 acre piece of land, given to the Town at the 
time adjoining lands were sub-divided, is managed as wild land for the benefit of wildlife and for 
low impact recreation. The forest covering the Trescott Ridge Wetlands continues south and east 
to the open meadow on the Hayes property. 

The addition of this acreage to the Trescott Ridge Wetlands will benefit wildlife by providing a 
larger undisturbed habitat area, protect water quality by limiting development around the 
wetlands and provide people with a larger natural area to enjoy on foot. Permanent protection of 
Town owned conservation land is recommended in both the Open Space Priorities Plan and the 
Master Plan, particularly the recommendation: to protect the attributes of specific sites and little 
places that, collectively, create the outdoor ambiance of Hanover, and which go far towards 
defining the character and enhancing the quality of neighborhoods. 

Neither zoning nor ownership permanently protects conservation land. Consistent with the 
recommendation in the Open Space Priorities Plan and the Master Plan that the town work with 
a land trust to devise a conservation easement to permanently protect each Town-owned 
conservation parcel, the Commission has begun work with the Hanover Conservation Council, a 
local non-profit conservation organization founded in 1963. The Council will ensure that the use 
limitations of agriculture, forestry, conservation and low impact recreation are permanently 
respected. From a management point of view it is appropriate to protect this land at the same 
time as the Hayes property. The Conservation Commission, the Board of Selectmen and the 
Hanover Conservation Council will jointly approve both the management plan and the 
conservation easement prior to transferring the easement to the Council. 

A map showing the Trescott Ridge Wetlands property is attached as Appendix C. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 



Part 11-14 



Article Nineteen: Purchase and Permanent Protection of the Steele Property 

The 2000 Open Space Priorities Plan guides the use of the Conservation Fund. Its maps show 
the proposed open space systems considered priorities in Town. The Steele property, 6 acres 
located across Route 10 from the Chieftain Motor Lodge, is shown as a priority for protection 
due to its location and natural resource importance, and as an element of the forested backdrop. 

The Steele property's location is one of its most important features. It is located on Route 10, 
across the street from the Chieftain Motor Inn and just north of the mowed field across from 
Kendal. The Steele property is bounded to the north by the Town-owned Rinker Tract and to the 
east and south by land owned by the Hanover Improvement Society. The property includes 400 
feet of frontage on Route 10. 

The land is noted for its dramatic topography and majestic trees. The land is wooded with tall 
pines and some deciduous trees on the upper plateau. It slopes moderately down to the south and 
more precipitously down to the east and north. A deep ravine, over 50 feet deep separates the 
upper plateau from Route 10. The land reaches east almost to the Storrs Pond dam and includes 
some of the shoreline of the Rinker Pond. 

This property is part of the forested backdrop cited in the Master Plan as being so important to 
the character of our in-town area. The property contributes to water quality protection at Storrs 
Pond and the Rinker Pond and provides wildlife habitat. It is scenic - framing the view across 
the mowed Ferguson field to the south and to Smarts Mountain as one looks north, and already 
has trails that link the Improvement Society's Ferguson Field with Storrs Pond. 

Were the Steele property to be sold for residential development, the result would be construction 
of a driveway in the scenic mowed field to the south. 

The owner, Diana Steele, inherited the land from her mother, Doris Cummings Ferguson. Mrs. 
Steele's mother was raised in the farmhouse at the Kendal entrance and sold the property to 
Kendal and the field across the street to the Hanover Improvement Society. Mrs. Steele thinks 
that her mother would have endorsed her plan to sell the land to the Town for addition to the 
open space system. 

The appraised value is $205,000. A total project cost of $220,000 includes development of a 
management plan, title work, legal and other costs associated with the land purchase and 
protection. A fundraising campaign was kicked off with a lead gift of $5,000 and as of March 
31, 2010 another $9,687 has been raised, including support from the Jocelyn F. Gutchess Fund, 
administered by the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation. The Hanover Conservation Council 
has also pledged financial support. The balance of the money that is not raised privately will be 
withdrawn from the Conservation Fund for the purchase and protection. 

Since the purchase price is over $50,000 the Conservation Commission must seek Town Meeting 
approval. This is a much anticipated and important addition to the open space lands in Hanover 
benefitting the water quality in Rinker and Storrs Pond and wildlife habitat, adding to the 
forested backdrop and providing recreational opportunities such as trail walking and bird 
watching. 

A map showing the Steele property is attached to this document as Appendix D. 

Part n- 15 



In turn, permanently protecting the Steele property means that uses on those 6 acres will be 
limited to conservation and recreation and will complement the existing use and permanent 
protection of the Rinker Tract to the north. Contiguity of open space and consistent management 
is beneficial for wildlife and for natural resources that do not follow property boundaries. The 
Rinker Tract, immediately to the north of the Steele Property is a 17.6 acre piece of land 
purchased by the Town in 1975. It is managed as wild land for the benefit of wildlife and Rinker 
Pond, and for low impact recreation. Protection of both the Steele Property and Rinker Tract 
ensures that the entire shoreline of Rinker Pond, a backwater of the Connecticut River and 
portion of Camp Brook, is fully conserved. 

Permanent protection of this land will benefit wildlife by providing a larger undisturbed habitat 
area, protect water quality by limiting development around Rinker Pond and provide people with 
a larger natural area to enjoy on foot. Permanent protection of Town owned conservation land is 
recommended in both the Open Space Priorities Plan and the Master Plan, particularly the 
recommendation: to protect the attributes of specific sites and little places that, collectively, 
create the outdoor ambiance of Hanover, and which go far towards defining the character and 
enhancing the quality of neighborhoods. 

Neither zoning nor ownership permanently protects conservation land. Consistent with the 
recommendation in the Open Space Priorities Plan and the Master Plan that the town work with 
a land trust to devise a conservation easement to permanently protect each Town-owned 
conservation parcel, the Commission has begun work with the Hanover Conservation Council, a 
local non-profit conservation organization founded in 1963. The Council will ensure that the use 
limitations of agriculture, forestry, conservation and low impact recreation are permanently 
respected. From a management point of view it is appropriate to protect this land at the same 
time as the Rinker Tract. The Conservation Commission, the Board of Selectmen and the 
Hanover Conservation Council will jointly approve both the management plan and the 
conservation easement prior to transferring the easement to the Council. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Twenty: Permanent Protection of the Rinker Tract 

Permanently protecting the Rinker Tract means that uses will be limited to conservation and low 
impact recreation and will complement the existing use and permanent protection of the Steele 
Property to the south. The Rinker Tract, 17.6 acres located on Route 10 was purchased by the 
Town in 1975 using Land and Water Conservation Funds. By accepting these funds, the Town is 
obligated to use the land wholly for, or in support of, public outdoor recreation. In addition, if 
the Town were to convert the land from public outdoor recreation use, adequate substitution and 
replacement of the land would need to be provided. This obstacle to converting the use does not 
permanently protect the land. Likewise not all public outdoor recreation is consistent with 
provision of wildlife habitat, proper management of the steep slopes and water frontage, and the 
low impact trails now sited on the steep slopes and highly erodible soils present at the Rinker 
Tract. 



Part 11-16 



Neither zoning nor ownership permanently proteets conservation land. Consistent with the 
recommendation in the Open Space Priorities Plan and the Master Plan that the town work with 
a land trust to devise a conservation easement to permanently protect each Town-owned 
conservation parcel, the Commission has begun work with the Hanover Conservation Council, a 
local non-profit conservation organization founded in 1963. The Council will ensure that the use 
limitations of conservation and low impact recreation are permanently respected. From a 
management point of view it is appropriate to protect this land at the same time as the Steele 
property. The Conservation Commission, the Board of Selectmen and the Hanover Conservation 
Council will jointly approve both the management plan and the conservation easement prior to 
transferring the easement to the Council. 

A map showing the Rinker Tract is attached to this document as Appendix D. 

The Board of Selectmen voted 5-0 to support this warrant article during the Pre-Town Meeting 
public hearing held on April 5, 2010. 

Article Twenty-One: Outreach House (by petition) 

FY 2010-201 1 is the third year that the Town of Hanover has received a funding request from 
the Outreach House. This agency, located in Hanover, provides a comfortable home for senior 
family members who require some assistance. This article has been submitted by petition 
because the agency inadvertently missed the formal funding request due date. 

Article Twenty-Two: ACoRN (by petition) 

Prior to 2007, ACoRN had been a recipient of Town funding for social service agencies but did 
not submit requests for funding in FY 2008-2009 or 2009-2010. Given that the Town has 
traditionally requested that agencies submit funding requests directly to Town Meeting for the 
first three years, the Board requested that ACoRN begin by making a funding request directly to 
Town Meeting for FY 2010-201 1. 

Article Twenty-Three: Marriage Equality (by petition) 

This warrant article was submitted by petition and will be presented for discussion by the 
petitioner. 

Article Twenty-Four: 9/11 Independent Investigation (by petition) 

This warrant article was submitted by petition and will be presented for discussion by the 
petitioner. 

Article Twenty-Five: Other Items 

This warrant article allows attendees at Town Meeting to raise any other items for consideration. 



Part II- 17 



APPENDIX A 



Full Text of Proposed Amendments to the Hanover Zoning Ordinance, reflecting 
Actions of the Hanover Planning Board at a Public Hearing held on February 9, 2010. 

Text proposed to be amended in shown in bold italics and bold italic strikcthrough . 

Article Two: Amendment No. 1 

Amend Section 702 Reference to Site Plan and Subdivision Design Review: 

"702. 7. B (3) For any proposal for which subdivision or site plan approval by the Planning 
Board is required, no application for Special Exception or Administrative Permit shall be 
accepted until preliminary the Design Review phase of subdivision or site plan review has been 
completed; the application for Special Exception or Administrative Permit shall reflect the 
Planning Board's resulting recommendations." 

Article Three: Amendment No. 2 

Amend Section 803 Expansion of Non-Conforming Structures: 

"Section 803 Change of Non-Conforming Structures 

A non-conforming structure may be enlarged or extended if no part of the enlargement or 
extension violates any dimensional requirement of this ordinance. 

If the non-conforming structure is non-conforming only with respect to setback 
requirements, it may be enlarged or extended if the enlargement or extension would be: 

A. No closer than the existing structure to the lot line(s) to which the existing 
structure is non-conforming; 

B. No higher than the existing structure; and 

C. No closer than the closest point of the existing structure to a structure on an 
adjacent property. 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment may grant a Special Exception , using the criteria of 
Section 206, for an addition to a non-conforming structure, which is non-conforming 
only with respect to setback requirements, and which proposed addition extends no closer 
than the existing structure to the lot line(s) to which the existing structure is non- 
conforming, even if criteria (b) and/or (c) above are not met, if it finds in the 
circumstances that the criteria of Section 206 are met. Any other enlargement or 
extension shall not take place unless a Variance is obtained under Article X. 

If a non-conforming structure has become structurally deficient the Zoning Administrator 
may issue a zoning permit for the razing, rebuilding and restoration of such structure as a 
replica of the exterior of the original structure, being no larger in volume, foot print, floor 
space and height than the original structure, and in substantially the same location." 



Part 11-18 



Article Four: Amendment No. 3 

Amend Section 1001 Notice to Abutters of Pending Residential Zoning Permit: 

"1001.3 Upon receipt of a completed application for a residential project, abutters shall be 
notified of the pending application. The Zoning Administrator shall determine whether 
an application for a permit is in compliance with this Ordinance. If the Zoning 
Administrator determines that it is, the application for permit shall be approved and a 
Zoning Permit issued. SUCH ZONING PERMIT SHALL NOT TAKE EFFECT UNTIL 
THE APPEAL PERIOD HAS EXPIRED. The Zoning Administrator shall act upon any 
application within fifteen (15) days after it has been filed." 

Article Five: Amendment No. 4 

Amend Section 1006 Update of Variance Criteria: 

"1006.1 The Board of Adjustment may, on an appeal, grant a Variance from the provisions of 
this Ordinance, if the applicant produces evidence to support a finding of each of the 
following facts by the Board of Adjustment: 

A-. Special conditions exist such that a literal enforcement of the Ordinance results 

in unnecessary hardship. "Special conditions" can include irregularity, 

narrowness, shallowness, size or shape of the lot, or exceptional topographical 
or other physical conditions peculiar to the property and not the circumstances 
or conditions generally created by the provisions of the Ordinance in the 
neighborhood or district in which the property is located. — What constitutes 
unnecessary hardship will depend on whether the applicant is seekins a use 
variance or an area (dimensional) variance. 

m For a use variance, the applicant must demonstrate that: 

{a) The zoning restriction as applied interferes with applicant's 

reasonable use of the property, considering the unique setting of 
the property in its environment; 

{b) No fair and substantial relationship exists between the general 

purposes of the Ordinance and the specific restriction on the 
property; and 

(e) The variance would not injure the public or private rights of 

others. 

{2) For an area variance, the applicant must demonstrate that: 

{a) The variance is necessary to enable the proposed use of the 

property given the special conditions of the property; and 

{&) The benefit sought cannot be achieved by some other method 

reasonably feasible to pursue, other than the variance. 

S-. The variance will be consistent with the spirit of the ordinance and would not 

violate the ordinance's basic zoning objectives. 

€-. The variance will not be contrary to the public interest, such that it would alter 

the essential character of the neighborhood or threaten the public health, safety 
or welfare. 

Ik The value of surrounding properties will not be diminished. 

E-. Substantial justice is done, such that the loss to the applicant from the denial of 

the variance is not outyveighed by the gain to the general public from such a 
denial. 

Part 11-19 



A. The variance will not be contrary to the public interest; 

B. The spirit of the Ordinance is observed: 

C. Substantial justice is done; 

D. The values of surrounding properties are not diminished; and 

E. Literal enforcement of the provisions of the Ordinance would result in an 
unnecessary hardship. 

(1) For purposes of this subparagraph, "unnecessary hardship" means that, 
owing to special conditions of the property that distinguish it from other 
properties in the area: 

(a) No fair and substantial relationship exists between the general 
public purposes of the Ordinance provision and the specific 
application of that provision to the property; and 

(b) The proposed use is a reasonable one. 

(2) If the criteria in subparagraph (1) are not established, an unnecessary 
hardship will be deemed to exist, if, and only if, owing to special 
conditions of the property that distinguish it from other properties in the 
area, the property cannot be reasonably used in strict conformance with 
the Ordinance, and a variance is therefore necessary to enable a 
reasonable use of it. 

The definition of "unnecessary hardship" set forth in subparagraph E shall 
apply whether the provision of the Ordinance from which a variance is sought 
is a restriction on use, a dimensional or other limitation on a permitted use, or 
any other requirement of the Ordinance." 



Part 11-20 



APPENDIX B 




Part 11-21 



APPENDIX C 




MAP SHOWING TRESCOTT RIDGE CONSERVATION LAND (tax map 5, lot 46) 

together with the Town ("Etna") Library, the Etna Fire Station, and adjacent property 
proposed to be purchased by the Town of Hanover from the Estate of Ethel Hayes 

compiled from portions of tax maps. 5, 29, and 31 



Part 11-22 



APPENDIX D 




Part 11-23 



Notes. 



Part 11-24 



Chapter 2 



Selectmen, 
Town Manager 

and 
Budget Reports 



TOWN of HANOVER 

HANOVER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03755 
P.O. BOX 483 G03/S4J.4123 



Selectmen's Letter 
2009 



Dear Citizens of Hanover: 



The Selectmen are pleased to present highlights of the Town's operations during the past year. 
We thank and praise Hanover's citizens for their exercise of and participation in the democratic 
process. A particular thank you to those energetic and devoted citizens who gave thousands of 
hours serving on the Town's Boards, Commissions, and working committees over the past year. 



The Town 

Public Facilities 

Hanover Water Works Company (HWWC): After many presentations of the plans for the 
municipalization of the Hanover Water Works Company and subsequent meetings, our citizens 
at two Town Meetings (the regular May, 2009 Town Meeting and another Special Town Meeting 
in October of 2009), voted to municipalize the HWWC. On July 1, 2010 the former HWWC will 
be divided into two parts: 

• The first will be wholly owned by the Town of Hanover and includes the reservoirs and 
surrounding land up to 250 feet from the waters edge in Reservoirs One and Two plus all 
of the Third Reservoir property, the dams, water regulation and purifications systems and 
related buildings and the Town-wide delivery systems. All of these facilities will be 
managed by the Town Public Works Department. The land portion is about 200 acres in 
size. 

• The second portion which contains the remaining land in the watershed, about 1,200 
acres, will be owned and managed by a private company, The Trescott Corporation, 50% 
owned by Dartmouth College and 50% by the Town of Hanover. 

Our profound gratitude belongs to Dartmouth College for their cooperation and generosity in 
assisting the Town in ensuring that we will all be able to access plentiful, pure water for many 
years in the future. 



10 



Hanover Water Reelamalion Faeility (a.k.a. Wastewater Treatment Plant): Improvements 
to the wastewater system continue to be made. The secondary treatment system is up to full 
capacity and the third phase of facility work has begun, targeting replacement of existing 
obsolete and/or worn-out equipment, improving reliability, increasing efficiency and reducing 
the community's carbon footprint. A large reduction in the carbon footprint will be realized by 
using the methane gas, a by-product of wastewater treatment, as fuel to power portions of the 
facility. This improvement, on line in 2012, will save a minimum of 10,000 gallons of fuel oil 
annually. 

Public Works: In the past year Allen Street was rebuilt and energy-saving LED light fixtures 
were installed. With the assistance of federal grant money we will continue to install LED 
fixtures on Main St. and the Ledyard Bridge, resulting in greater energy savings. Road 
reconstruction will continue with improvements to the Lyme Road streetscape between the 
Reservoir Road roundabout and Richmond Middle School and replacement of the old traffic 
signal and improved pedestrian crossings at the Lyme Road/North Park St. intersection. Bridges 
on River Road near the Lyme Town line and one on Ruddsboro Road are also slated for 
replacement. Efforts continue throughout the Town to reduce the community's carbon footprint. 
Energy audits will be performed at the Police/Fire Facility which we believe will document the 
need for new energy rated windows, insulation and siding, and new exterior doors. Biodiesel 
continues to be utilized in all diesel powered Town equipment. 

Howe Library: Howe staff and patrons continue to enjoy the enlarged and improved Howe 
Library as well as the use of the Howe Library services resulting from technology enhancements. 
Commencing August 5, 2010 the migration to an open source computer system will enhance our 
intra-library systems as well as save our taxpayers $20,000 each year. 

New programs and facilities include a community-wide "Everyone is Reading" series with 552 
people participating in 15 programs. The Howe was also one of the first public libraries to lend 
Amazon Kindles, with others following our lead. A private donor continues to fund free or 
reduced-cost passes to 1 New England museums. 

Circulation of teen materials has doubled since the completion of the 2005 library addition and 
renovation, resulting in the hiring of a Part-time Teen Services Specialist in August 2009. The 
Howe's service to the Town continues as a community gathering place and as a center for the 
development of young readers. 

Parks and Recreation Department: The Hanover Parks and Recreation Department continues 
to oversee expansion of recreation program offerings in response to user interest. The programs 
range from well subscribed seasonal sports offerings for Grades K-8 and adults as well as many 
special activities such as the Occom Pond Party and the Fourth of July Celebration. Use of the 
Richard W. Black Community & Senior Center continues to grow, much to the delight of the 
staff and the users. 

Downtown: Downtown Hanover continues to be a place of construction. The Dartmouth 
College building on Currier Street is completed and the College has commenced construction of 
the Visual Arts Center on Lebanon Street with completion anticipated in 2012. A new hotel is 
under construction on the former Church's Children's Shop site on South Street. The Downtown 
Marketing Association continues to actively market Downtown Hanover in several new ways. 

11 



Public Safety: We may always depend upon the men and women of the Hanover Police and 
Fire Departments to provide professional and compassionate service, creating a safe environment 
and enhancing the quality of life in our community. 

The Dispatch Center provides round-the-clock coverage to twelve New Hampshire and eight 
Vermont towns, involving 34 public safety agencies that contract with the Town of Hanover for 
this regional emergency communications service. The fiber project was completed, resulting in 
the connection of all Town and School District facilities for emergency communications 
purposes and connecting the Hanover Dispatch Center with the City of Lebanon's Dispatch 
Center to insure redundancy in our emergency communications services. New video surveillance 
systems have been installed in the Public Safety complex replacing systems whose parts were 
between 9 and 20 years old. The video system is expandable and we anticipate integrating this 
system with the video systems at the parking garage and the municipal parking lot behind the 
Town Hall. 

Our Firefighters continue to pursue educational opportunities in property and life protection as 
well as becoming accredited Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians. In addition to 
providing Emergency Medical Services our EMT's were trained in the administration of 
vaccines and have been serving at regional flu clinics. 2009 marked the third year of a five year 
transition in Fire District tax rates, reflecting the revised allocation methodology which resulted 
from a recommended shift from four Fire Districts down to three - an in-town Hydrant District 
(District #1) which will bear the full costs of the fire hydrant system in addition to the common 
costs shared by the other two districts; a Non-Hydrant District (District #2); and a Remote Rural 
District (District #3) for properties east of the ridge line of Moose Mountain in the Forestry 
zoning district which will be assessed at 50% of the Non-Hydrant District rate. 

Sustainable Hanover: During the past decade, citizens in Hanover have been working to ensure 
sustainable prosperity and well-being for the community. Since 2003, a growing body of 
evidence suggests that communities like Hanover must pay increasingly close attention to issues 
associated with climate change, peak oil consumption and sustainability. The Sustainable 
Hanover Committee (SHC) was created from the former Recycling Committee and charged with 
serving as a clearinghouse and collaborative umbrella for the many sustainability initiatives 
occurring in Hanover. To this end, 2010 will be the year of goal-setting and strategic 
sustainability planning and finally creating a vision of a sustainable community that includes 
specific goals and a structure for measuring success. The SHC will engage the community in a 
conversation about sustainability indicators and actions enabling all of our citizens to participate 
in the ongoing measurement of our collective challenges and successes. 



Affordable Housing: Construction continues on the development known as Gile Hill, which 
started in 2001 and was shepherded by the Hanover Affordable Housing Commission (HAHC) 
through concept, preliminary design, and into project management which is provided by Twin 
Pines Housing Trust and the Hartland Group. The development was dedicated by Governor 
Lynch in October 2007. Eight buildings are now open and fully occupied. They contain 61 
rentals, and 16 ownership units. Two additional buildings containing 20 condo units are under 
construction and will be opened in the spring of 2010. The remaining 23 condo units in the final 
two buildings are planned for occupancy in the spring of 2012. 



12 



The HAHC has been studying the possibilities of various in-town sites for affordable housing 
and is also working cooperatively with Dartmouth College on the long-range planning of off- 
campus housing for its employees. 



Hanover's International Partners: Hanover will be hosting twelve student visitors from 
Joigny, our sister-city in France, in April and in July thirteen of our students will be enjoying a 
visit to Joigny. Sadly, our student visit from Nihonmatsu, our Friendship City in Japan, was 
cancelled this year because of the H1N1 viral epidemic. 

The Town's Finances: The Board of Selectmen has monitored the national, state and local 
fiscal situation very closely over the past 1 8 months in recognition that this recession has been 
hard hitting. We believe that the region is now at the bottom of the trough, but turbulence 
continues as we bump along that bottom. Given the hardship we are observing, the Board opted 
to take a very conservative approach to the budget for FY 2010-201 1, requesting that Town staff 
develop a budget with expenditure components that could be pulled out of the budget to enable a 
0% tax rate increase for the General Fund. The Board ultimately adopted a budget requiring a 
0.3% tax rate increase. We do so acknowledging that FY 201 1-2012 may also be a difficult year, 
as the region, the state and the nation struggle out of the recession, as Dartmouth and other major 
employers wrestle with their own financial problems, and as the State confronts a worsening 
structural deficit. We feel we have positioned the Town well for the rough road that is ahead and 
remain committed to being sensitive to the concerns of our taxpayers. 



The Selectmen, Town Administration and the Employees of the Town of Hanover wish all of our 
citizens a happy, healthy 2010, recognizing that while we are facing some tough financial times, 
we live in a wonderful, supportive and resilient community which will mark its 250th 
anniversary in 201 1 . 



Hanover Board of Selectmen 

Brian F. Walsh 
Katherine S. Connolly 
Peter L. Christie 
Athos J. Rassias 
Judith A. Doherty 



13 



Town Manager's Budget 
2010-2011 Proposed Budget 



The Proposed Budget for FY 2010-201 1, as recommended by the Board of Selectmen for 
Town Meeting action, recommends total appropriations of $23,124,561 for the General Fund, 
Fire Fund, Ambulance Fund, Water Reclamation Facility Fund, Water Utility Fund, Downtown 
Business Service District Fund, and the Parking Fund. We distribute the Housing Fund Budget 
as a separate document because it is only subject to a public hearing by the Board of Selectmen 
acting as the Housing Authority Board and does not require Town Meeting approval. 

These combined recommended FY 2010-2011 expenditures represent an increase of 
$3,412,593 or 17.3% over the total appropriations approved for FY 2009-2010. This 
extraordinary increase in the appropriation level is driven by two factors: 

• $1,480,330 in first-time appropriations for the Water Utility Fund 

As a result of the Special Town Meeting held October 27-28, 2009, the Hanover 
Water Works Company will become a municipal utility on or about July 1, 2010. 
The projected FY 2010-2011 expenses of $1,480,330 related to the treatment and 
delivery of potable water will be recorded in a separate enterprise fund, the Water 
Utility Fund, and will be fully funded by revenues generated by the utility 
customers. 

• $2,000,000 in ongoing capital improvements to the Water Reclamation Facility 

At the May 2008 Town Meeting, voters approved an initial $6,000,000 in 
borrowing to launch the next phase of improvements to the Water Reclamation 
Facility. As part of the Town Meeting discussion, it was presented that the total cost 
of Phase III improvements would be $7,442,000 and that the remaining project 
amounts would be appropriated in several phases over the coming years. The 
$2,000,000 proposed in the FY 2010-2011 budget represents the balance of this 
initial project plus a portion of an appropriation for the upgrade of Pump Station 
#5. An additional $600,000 authorization in FY 2011-2012 will be necessary to 
complete all the work. The upgrade of this pump station was added to the scope of 
this overall project because of federal stimulus monies (ARRA) made available to 
the Town via a State grant aid program administered by the New Hampshire 
Department of Environmental Services. The ARRA funding provides for 50% loan 
forgiveness for the Aeration Improvements and Pump Station #5, which will allow 
Pump Station #5 to be added to the Phase III projects without having to increase 
sewer usage rates. Like the Water Utility Fund, all expenditures related to the 
treatment of wastewater are fully funded by utility customers discharging to the 
plant. 



14 



Of this total appropriation, $2,640,549 represents capital reserve and other reserve fund 
purchases which are offset by the appropriation of revenue to finance the purchases from their 
respective reserves. As such, capital reserve purchases do not impact the tax rate. The total 
capital reserve expenditure recommendations represent a $1,974,733 or 292.2% increase over the 
FY 2009-2010 Budget, driven by the proposed withdrawal totaling $2,000,000 from the Water 
Reclamation Facility Undesignated Fund Balance ($300,000) and the Sewer Equipment and 
Facilities Improvements Capital Reserve Fund ($1,700,000). The actual expenditures net of 
capital projects funded from capital reserves and other reserve funds represent a total 
$20,474,012 or 7.6% over the FY 2009-2010 Budget. The year-to-year increase of 
$1,437,869 includes the $1,480,330 of new appropriations for the Water Utility Fund. Net of 
the newly added Water Utility Fund, there is a 0.2% year-to-year decrease in budgeted 
appropriations net of capital projects funded from reserves. 



A Note about Continuing Federal, State and Local Fiscal Stress 

This proposal has been developed in the midst of what is, admittedly, one of the worst 
economic downturns in U.S. history - one that has not left the Upper Valley unscathed. The 
combined impact of a deep and extended national recession, a significant set of ongoing fiscal 
challenges facing the State of New Hampshire, and significant economic dislocation in the Upper 
Valley and in Hanover led Town staff to prepare and the Board of Selectmen to adopt an 
extremely conservative budget on both the revenue and expenditure side. We have done so with 
the knowledge that the downturn is likely to be fairly long, in recognition that we have likely 
reached the bottom of the trough but are continuing to experience significant turbulence while at 
bottom. Neither staff nor the Board of Selectmen feel we can assume that the current economic 
situation will be significantly improved over the next two to three years - hence we have used 
our work on this budget to set things in place for addressing the near and longer-term. 

Town staff is clearly observing and feeling how the Hanover community is weathering this 
economic climate. We see it when people register their vehicles, we hear it when folks pay their 
taxes, and we are listening. Town staff proposed and the Board of Selectmen adopted a final 
budget for recommendation to Town Meeting that will continue to deliver the excellent services 
our residents have come to expect but is focused on ways in which we can tighten our belt. 

The State's unstable fiscal situation continues to compound our own. Having chosen to 
downshift a portion of their deficit to cities and towns during their FY 2009-2011 biennial 
budget, we continue to live with the impacts in the Proposed Budget, including continued lost 
general revenue sharing ($177,000) and a further ramp-back of Group II retirement system 
support for employer contributions from 30% in the current fiscal year (already down from the 
historic 35% contribution) to 25% in FY 2010-201 1. We worry about the potential loss of some 
or all of municipal Meals and Rooms Tax payments in the upcoming fiscal year, currently 
totaling $487,000 per year for Hanover. Given that the State Legislature is now planning for the 
second year of its biennium, the State Legislature is unlikely to make significant additional 
changes that will negatively impact communities in FY 2010-2011. We should assume, 
however, that local social service agencies will be impacted by the cuts now being required of 
State agencies like Health and Human Services. And we all need to be concerned about the 20 1 1 
Legislative session, which promises to further devastate local municipal and school, county and 
state agency budgets. A return to Donor communities looms as a potential; other sources of 
State-shared revenue could be reduced or stripped from cities and towns; and the State could 

15 



introduce new fees which municipalities will be required to pay. In short, the State's short-term 
fiscal future is very bleak, and local communities, school districts and counties are vulnerable. 



I. Tax Supported Funds 

General Fund 

The General Fund Proposed Budget for FY 2010-201 1 recommends appropriations totaling 
$12,072,374, which represents an increase of $184,980 or 1.6% above the appropriation for FY 
2009-2010. Taking into account the benefit of the growth in total assessed valuation (projected to 
be $25 million) and netting out the General Fund's capital reserve expenditures totaling 
$465,084 which are offset by the transfer in of revenue from various reserves, a 0.3% General 
Fund tax rate increase is required to fund this budget. 

Key components of the Proposed General Fund Budget for FY 2010-2011 include the 
following: 

1 . An estimated $25 million increase in total assessed valuation which generates an additional 
$99,000 at the current tax rates above the tax revenues budgeted for FY 2009-2010; 

2. We continue to be challenged in maximizing our short-term interest earnings in this climate 
of 3-month Treasury Bill rates hovering at or below 0.10%. Consequently, we have further 
reduced our projected earnings by $75,000 to reflect these low yields. 

3. Despite the overall dormant economic climate, Building Permit revenues are projected to 
increase by $86,122, due principally to Dartmouth College's Visual Arts Center and 
Thayer Dining Hall renovations moving forward. 

4. The NH Department of Transportation has notified us that the Town's allocation of 
Highway Block Grant Aid is to increase from $241,985 to $279,282, an increase of 
$37,297. Given recent history, we are somewhat tentative in the certainty of this increase, 
but we have budgeted what we know as of now. 

5. As Salaries and Benefits comprise 70% of the overall General Fund Operating Budget, the 
projected 3.0% wage scale adjustment based on the current union contract in place plus 
projected increases in health care premiums, in workers compensation premiums, and in 
employer contributions to the New Hampshire Retirement System for Group II employees 
(police officers in the General Fund) account for the lion's share of the overall expenditure 
increase in the General Fund. The total increase in Salaries and Benefits, a year-to-year 
increase of 4.5%, represents an additional $368,730 of General Fund expenditures. 

6. Additional funds of $25,000 are budgeted to provide funding for a joint Upper Valley 
celebration of the 250 th Anniversary of Hanover's and other local towns' charter dates. 

7. By adding the Water Utility Fund to the array of Town fund groups, the base across which 
to spread General & Administrative Overhead grows, providing some additional relief to 
the General Fund. The budget to budget increase in G&A allocated to other fund groups 
increases by $48,501. 

16 



8. Additional funds of $20,000 are budgeted to provide funding for a turn-key solution to a 
more functional and appealing Town website. More and more, our citizens are turning to 
our website to get updated on Town news, policies, procedures, etc. and to conduct 
business. The current website has served us reasonably well over the last decade, but the 
technology is out-of-date and does not allow for simple and consistent document uploads. 

9. Highway Maintenance Funds are proposed to increase by $25,167 to continue to work 
towards full funding of the anticipated cost for salt and sand used for road maintenance. 
Every effort has been made to control the amount of product being used without 
compromising safety, but additional funding is needed to reflect the current cost of these 
materials. 

10. Changes in the projected price of diesel oil used for our heavy equipment and for heating 
Town facilities has resulted in General Fund savings totaling $25,264 with the per gallon 
price decreasing from the $3.00 gallon in the FY 2009-2010 budget to a projected $2.50 in 
the proposed FY 2010-201 1 budget. 

11. A draw of $95,000 from the Bridge Replacement and Renovation Capital Reserve Funds 
has been appropriated to repair the bridge on River Road just south of the Lyme border 
which was recently reported to be in very tough shape after a Fall, 2009 State DOT 
inspection. If funds remain after that bridge is replaced, staff hopes to begin work on the 
bridge on Ruddsboro Road west of Chandler Road. This bridge has been "red-listed" by the 
State, and - although citizens are in no immediate danger - it's important that we address 
the structural deficiencies of the bridge. We are fortunate to be able to repair these bridges 
without impacting the tax rate as the projects will be funded from accumulated capital 
reserve funds. 

12. A $20,000 funding request has been proposed to replace the ballistic vest equipment worn 
by our police officers. The existing equipment in use has a warranty that expires January 
201 1, and there is an element of risk deploying our officers in equipment not deemed to be 
reliable by the manufacturer. 



Fire Fund 

The proposed FY 2010-2011 Budget recommends Fire Fund expenditures of $2,841,632, 
representing an increase of $11,422 above the FY 2009-2010 appropriations. Funding for the 
Fire Department is substantially drawn from property taxes assessed to three different fire 
districts: Fire District #1 serviced by fire hydrants; Fire District #2 not serviced by fire hydrants 
and west of Moose Mountain; and Fire District #3 not serviced by fire hydrants and east of 
Moose Mountain. The costs related to the fire hydrant system are borne only by those taxpayers 
in Fire District #1; all other costs, such as Personnel, are shared equitably among the property 
valuation in Fire Districts #1 and #2; and Fire District #3 pays one-half of the Fire District #2 
rate in recognition of the delay in service delivery given their remote location. These new 
districts were implemented in FY 2007-2008, and the full impact of the reallocation of Fire 
Department costs among these three districts was to be phased in over five years. The upcoming 
FY 2010-201 1 represents the fourth of this five year transition. 



17 



The proposed Fire District tax levy for FY 2010-2011 is projected to be $2,513,711, up 
from the current year's levy of $2,500,142. With projected growth in the Town's net assessed 
valuation, if the projected tax levy was recovered through one tax rate across all Town 
properties, there would be a 0.74% tax rate decrease. However, because of the 5-year transition 
of a greater share of shared Fire Department costs over to Fire Districts #2 and #3, these districts 
will see the following increases: 

Current Rate Proposed Rate 

(FY2010) (FY2011) % Increase 

Fire District #1 1.45 1.41 -2.76% 

Fire District #2 .92 .96 4.35% 

Fire District #3 .46 .48 4.35% 

There are several items of note in the Proposed Fire Fund Budget: 

1. The budget-relief from SAFER grant funding which helped to offset the cost of four 
additional firefighters is gone from the proposed budget. FY 2009-2010 represented the final 
year of the grant program. This represents a reduction of non-tax revenues of $48,000. 

2. The Fire Fund has accumulated an Undesignated Fund Balance of $590,285 which 
represents, in essence, excess tax revenue being raised over the past several years as 
compared with expenditures. In accordance with the Board's policy governing the 
maintenance of Undesignated Fund Balances, a revenue line-item of $150,000 has been 
proposed in the FY 2010-2011, with another $150,000 amount to be utilized in FY 2011- 
2012 to bring the balance down to 10% of anticipated funds expenditures. This use of 
revenue helps to reduce the rate of tax rate increase in the Fire Districts. 

3. Overtime is an area that management continues to actively monitor. Different coverage and 
call-back strategies are being explored to minimize this expense. To this end, the proposed 
budget represents a reduction of $30,000 in this line-item. 



Parking Fund 

The Parking Fund Budget for FY 2010-2011 anticipates expenses and revenues of 
$1,699,260, which is a decrease of $43,716 or 2.5% below the FY 2009-2010 appropriations. 
The decrease reflects the less ambitious roster of capital maintenance projects for the 7 Lebanon 
Street Parking Facility. 

Work on the facility deck membrane moves from the upper deck to the lower level, and 
$100,000 has been budgeted for this ongoing work. The membrane coating which has been 
applied to the decking surface has shown substantial wear-and-tear and needs to be essentially 
replaced to insure the structural integrity of the exposed concrete surfaces. Town staff has talked 
with several contractors as well as other parking garage operators and is recommending this 
approach based on the considerable feedback we have received. 

18 



A full-scale lighting upgrade to LED fixtures has been included in the proposed budget in 
the amount of $75,465. Between annual energy cost savings of $13,000 and reduced 
maintenance costs projected to be over $1,000, the payback of this investment is just over 5- 
years. Not only does this project make sense from a financial standpoint, but it presents an ideal 
opportunity for us to continue to try to reduce the environmental impact of municipal operations. 



II. Non-Tax Supported Funds 



Ambulance Fund 



The FY 2010-2011 Budget for the Ambulance Fund recommends expenditures of 
$641,688, which amounts to a decrease of $190,387, or 22.9% below the FY 2009-2010 Budget. 
This increase is solely related to the FY 2009-2010 scheduled replacement of the ambulance, 
which was funded through an appropriation from the Ambulance Services Equipment Reserve. 

Beginning in October 2006, the Town outsourced ambulance billing to a third party 
provider, Comstar, which continues to be an invaluable resource in advising the Town of 
Hanover on rate adjustments and billing practices. We are working with them closely to devise a 
strategy on how to respond to the 2010 Medicare Rates which will be 7.4% lower than the 2009 
rates. To prepare for this impact, we have reduced patient billings and increased contractual 
obligations (i.e., the amount disallowed by Medicare). 

The per-capita community contributions from the Towns of Hanover, Lyme and Norwich 
help to offset Hanover Ambulance Service operating costs not covered by patient billings. These 
contributions are outlined below. The per capita rate is proposed to increase from $22.31 to 
$22.81, or 1.3%. 



Town 



Hanover 
Lyme 
Norwich 
Totals 



FY2010 
Contribution 

$172,077 
$ 38,378 
$ 79,590 
$290.045 



Proposed FY 

2011 
Contribution 

$172,583 
$ 38,686 
$ 80,019 
$291.288 



Water Reclamation Facility Fund 

The recommended expenditures in the WRF Fund for FY 2010-201 1 are $4,364,277 which 
represents an increase of $1,969,964, or 82.3%, all related to the proposed $2,000,000 capital 
improvements as the next sequence of the Phase III renovations already underway. 

The Phase III improvements approved in concept at the May 2008 Town Meeting, where 
$6,000,000 of funding from the State Revolving Loan Fund was appropriated, are well 
underway. The goals of these improvements are to: (1) replace aging and obsolete equipment; 



19 



(2) reduce energy dependence; and (3) continue to improve solids handling capacity. With the 
injection of ARRA funding, we are able to expand the scope of the project to include an overhaul 
of Pump Station #5 without impacting sewer rates. With this scope addition, the $7,442,000 
Phase III total presented at May 2008 Town Meeting is increased to $8,662,250, but with future 
debt forgiveness that results in no impact to ratepayers for the expanded project scope. 

The operating expenditures of the Water Reclamation Facility are funded by charges to 
those who utilize the facility. Sewer user fees are currently billed annually and are based on a 
fixed charge based on the size of the water meter, and a usage charge based on the amount of 
water flowing through the meter. With the pending municipalization of the Hanover Water 
Works, we expect the last annual sewer billing to be mailed in May 2010, and the inaugural 
combined quarterly water and sewer billing to be mailed in October 2010. 



Water Utility Fund 

FY 2010-201 1 represents the advent of the Water Utility Fund, which will account for the 
operations of the municipalized Hanover Water Works Company. 

Town staff will begin combined quarterly billing of both water and sewer in the fall of 
2010, and we expect to bring a current HWWCO staff member to Town Hall to oversee that 
regular billing function. Quarterly billing should significantly improve the cash flow of the 
water utility. 

Much of the upcoming fiscal year will be focused on reviewing water rates in depth and 
developing a comprehensive long-range capital improvement program for the utility, oriented 
around upgrades of existing secondary water lines throughout town. 



20 



TOWN OF HANOVER 
Budget Overview FY 2010-201 1 



General Fund and Special Accounts 

General Government Administration 

Town Properties 

Police Department 

Public Works 

Health and Welfare 

Parks and Recreation (incl. Senior Activities) 

Libraries 

Conservation Commission 

Affordable Housing Commission 

Unallocated - Pooled Expenditures 

Total General Fund 



2009-2010 


2010-2011 


IV '2009-10 to 


FY2010-11 


Approved Budget 


Proposed Budget 


CHANGE 


% CHANGE 


1,620,481 


1,712,653 


92,172 


5.7% 


739,552 


732,730 


(6,822) 


-0.9% 


1,954,842 


2,000,064 


45,222 


2.3% 


3,228,858 


3,345,005 


116,147 


3.6% 


281,193 


274,719 


(6,474) 


-2.3% 


570,603 


582,873 


12,270 


2.2% 


933,461 


975,226 


41,765 


4.5% 


205,215 


20,215 


(185,000) 


-90.1% 


2,100 


1,415 


(685) 


-32.6% 


2,351,089 


2,427,475 


76,386 


3.2% 


11,887,394 


12,072,374 


184,980 


1.6% 



Tax Supported Funds: 

General Fund 

Fire Fund 

Parking Operations 

Downtown Business Service District 

Total Expenditures-Tax Supptd. Funds 

Tax Subsidy 
Tax Ratio 



11,887,394 


12,072,374 


184,980 


1.6% 


2,830,210 


2,841,632 


11,422 


0.4% 


1,742,977 


1,699,260 


(43,716) 


-2.5% 


25,000 


25,000 


- 


0.0% 


16,485,581 


16,638,266 


152,686 


0.9% 


10,097,018 


10,418,032 


321,014 


3.2% 


61.25% 


62.61% 




2.2% 



Non-Tax Supported Funds: 

Water Reclamation Facility 

Water Utility Fund (Treatment and Delivery) 

Hanover Ambulance Services 

Total Non-Tax Funds 

Grand Total All Funds 



2,394,313 
832,075 


4,364,277 

1,480,330 

641,688 


1,969,964 
1,480,330 
(190,387) 


82.3% 
-22.9% 


3,226,388 


6,486,295 


3,259,907 


101.0% 


19,711,969 


23,124,561 


3,412,593 


17.3% 



Capital Projects Funded from Capital Reserve and Other Reserve Funds 

General Fund 219,086 

Parking Operations 270,000 

Water Reclamation Facility 

Ambulance Services 1 86,730 

Total Monies from Reserve Funds 675,816 



465,084 


245,998 


112.3% 


185,465 


(84,535) 


-31.3% 


2,000,000 


2,000,000 


- 


- 


(186,730) 


-100.0% 



2,650,549 



1,974,733 



292.2% 



Grand Total All Funds Less 
Capital and Other Reserve Purchases 



19,036,153 



20,474,012 



1,437,860 



7.6% 



Town of Hanover Budget Departmental Summary 



General Fund Revenues 

Admin Svcs & Other Genl Govt 
Planning and Zoning 
Town Properties 
Police 

Public Works 
Parks and Recreation 
Libraries 

Conservation Commission 
Unallocated - Pooled Revenues 
Total General Fund Revenues 







FY2011 


% Change FY10 


FY2009 Year- 


FY2010 


Proposed 


Budget to FY11 


End Actuals 


Adopted Budget 


Budget 


Budget 


1,294,019 


1,289,850 


1,320,850 


2.4% 


372,209 


327,678 


410,800 


25.4% 


25,022 


24,213 


24,697 


2.0% 


724,618 


530,827 


485,767 


-8.5% 


670,546 


657,485 


859,482 


30.7% 


306,626 


340,286 


349,234 


2.6% 


69,374 


67,620 


72,409 


7.1% 


13,578 


200,000 


15,000 


-92.5% 


8,043,013 


8,449,436 


8,534,134 


1.0% 


11,519,005 


11,887,395 


12,072,374 


1.6% 



General Fund Expenditures 
Personnel Costs 

Admin Svcs & Other Genl Govt 
Human Resources 
Administrative Services 
MIS 

Assessing 

Planning and Zoning 
Town Properties 
Police 

Public Works 
Health and Welfare 
Parks and Recreation 
Libraries 

Associated Employee Benefits 
Total Personnel Costs 



872,207 


890,890 


928,644 


4.2% 


146,633 


149,316 


153,757 


3.0% 


308,731 


308,406 


327,343 


6.1% 


108,073 


111,975 


117,642 


5.1% 


137,672 


139,798 


144,875 


3.6% 


341,842 


361,195 


367,118 


1.6% 


180,898 


189,134 


198,455 


4.9% 


1,719,695 


1,825,036 


1,892,266 


3.7% 


1,295,323 


1,387,215 


1,438,360 


3.7% 


7,296 


9,000 


4,000 


-55.6% 


325,047 


368,948 


381,599 


3.4% 


800,115 


807,840 


859,130 


6.3% 


1,962,119 


2,345,146 


2,483,562 


5.9% 



7,504,540 



8,184,404 



8,553,134 



4.5% 



Non-Personnel Costs 

Admin Svcs & Other Genl Govt 
Human Resources 
Administrative Services 
MIS 

Assessing 

Planning and Zoning 
Town Properties 
Police 

Public Works 
Health and Welfare 
Parks and Recreation 
Libraries 

Conservation Commission 
Affordable Housing Commission 
Unallocated - Pooled Expenditures 
Total Non-Personnel Costs 



305,047 


306,946 


356,921 


16.3% 


18,791 


20,175 


15,725 


-22.1% 


95,429 


86,505 


85,921 


-0.7% 


21,762 


30,893 


53,430 


73.0% 


24,609 


26,835 


46,050 


71.6% 


64,909 


61,450 


59,970 


-2.4% 


642,646 


550,418 


534,274 


-2.9% 


362,182 


129,806 


107,798 


-17.0% 


1,822,778 


1,841,643 


1,906,644 


3.5% 


255,580 


272,193 


270,719 


-0.5% 


206,244 


201,655 


201,274 


-0.2% 


135,605 


125,621 


116,096 


-7.6% 


40,193 


205,215 


20,215 


-90.1% 


459 


2,100 


1,415 


-32.6% 


86,937 


5,945 


(56,087) 


-1043.4% 



3,922,579 



3,702,992 



3,519,239 



-5.0% 



22 



Town of Hanover Budget Departmental Summary 









FY2011 


% Change IV 10 




FY2009 Year- 


FY2010 


Proposed 


Budget to FY1 1 




End Actuals 


Adopted Budget 


Budget 


Budget 


Total General Fund Expenditures 










Admin Svcs & Other Genl Govt 


1.177,254 


1,197,836 


1,285,565 


7.3% 


Human Resources 


165,424 


169,491 


169,482 


0.0% 


Administrative Services 


404,160 


394,911 


413,264 


4.6% 


MIS 


129,835 


142,868 


171,072 


19.7% 


Assessing 


162,281 


166,633 


190,925 


14.6% 


Planning and Zoning 


406,751 


422,645 


427,088 


1.1% 


Town Properties 


823,544 


739,552 


732,730 


-0.9% 


Police 


2,081,876 


1,954,842 


2,000,064 


2.3% 


Public Works 


3,118,101 


3,228,858 


3,345,005 


3.6% 


Health and Welfare 


262,876 


281,193 


274,719 


-2.3% 


Parks and Recreation 


531,290 


570,603 


582,873 


2.2% 


Libraries 


935,720 


933,461 


975,226 


4.5% 


Conservation Commission 


40,193 


205,215 


20,215 


-90.1% 


Affordable Housing Commission 


459 


2,100 


1,415 


-32.6% 


Unallocated - Pooled Expenditures 


2,049,055 


2,351,090 


2,427,475 


3.2% 


Total General Fund Expenditures 


11,427,120 


11,887,395 


12,072,374 


1.6% 



General Fund - Municipal Property Tax Rate 

Tax Subsidy 7,165,942 7,486,876 7,794,321 4.1% 

Tax Ratio 62.7% 63.0% 64.6% 

The Tax Ratio represents how much of the total General Fund costs are funded by municipal property taxes. 



Special and Enterprise Funds Revenues 

Fire Department 
Hanover Ambulance Services 
Water Reclamation Facility 
Water Utility Fund 
Parking Operations 
Downtown Business Service District 
Total Special Funds Revenues 



2,912,833 


2,830,210 


2,841,632 


0.4% 


673,079 


832,075 


641,688 


-22.9% 


2,665,447 


2,394,313 


4,364,277 


82.3% 


- 


- 


1,480,330 


- 


1,478,823 


1,742,977 


1,699,261 


-2.5% 


60,008 


25,000 


25,000 


0.0% 


7,790,190 


7,824,575 


11,052,187 


41.2% 



Special and Enterprise Funds Expenditures 
Personnel Costs 

Fire Department 
Hanover Ambulance Services 
Water Reclamation Facility 
Water Utility Fund 
Parking Operations 
Total Personnel Costs 



1,534,677 


1,671,963 


1,710,015 


2.3% 


431,583 


435,192 


444,183 


2.1% 


490,055 


516,643 


567,809 


9.9% 


- 


- 


436,332 


- 


394,972 


405,235 


441,123 


8.9% 



2,851,286 



3,029,033 



3,599,462 



18.8% 



23 



Town of Hanover Budget Departmental Summary 



FY2009 Year- 



FY2010 



End Actuals Adopted Budget 



FY2Q11 

Proposed 

Budget 



% Change FY10 

Budget to FY11 

Budget 



Non-Personnel Costs 

Fire Department 
Hanover Ambulance Services 
Water Reclamation Facility 
Water Utility Fund 
Parking Operations 
Downtown Business Service District 
Total Non-Personnel Costs 



1,190,810 


1,158,247 


1,131,617 


-2.3% 


199,887 


396,883 


197,505 


-50.2% 


1,902,390 


1,877,670 


3,796,467 


102.2% 


- 


- 


1,043,998 


- 


1,060,990 


1,337,742 


1,258,138 


-6.0% 


65,665 


25,000 


25,000 


0.0% 



4,419,743 



4,795,542 



7,452,725 



55.4% 



Total Special Fund Expenditures 

Fire Department 
Hanover Ambulance Services 
Water Reclamation Facility 
Water Utility Fund 
Parking Operations 
Downtown Business Service District 
Total Special Funds Expenditures 



2,725,486 


2,830,210 


2,841,632 


631,470 


832,075 


641,688 


2,392,445 


2,394,313 


4,364,277 


- 


- 


1,480,330 


1,455,962 


1,742,977 


1,699,260 


65,665 


25,000 


25,000 



7,271,029 



7,824,575 



11,052,187 



0.4% 

-22.9% 

82.3% 

-2.5% 
0.0% 



41.2% 



Special and Enterprise Funds Tax Subsidies 

Fire District Taxes 
Fire Fund Tax Ratio 

Parking District and Tax Increment 
Parking Fund Tax Ratio 

Downtown Business Svc District Tax 
Downtown Bus Svc Dist Tax Ratio 



2,645,081 


2,500,142 


2,513,711 


97.0% 


88.3% 


88.5%, 


85,731 


85,000 


85,000 


5.9%. 


4.9%, 


5.0%, 


50,454 


25,000 


25,000 


76.8% 


100.0%, 


100.0%, 



0.5%, 



0.0%, 



0.0%, 



24 



Town of Hanover - Recast Budget Summary - Functional Presentation 



General Fund 
Sources 

Property Taxes - Municipal Services Portion 

Motor Vehicle and Other Town Clerk Fees 

Charges for Services and Participant Fees 

State Appropriations and Federal and Other Grants 

Planning & Zoning Permits and Fees 

Other Taxes and Related Items (Land Use Change Tax, 

PILT, Yield Tax, Cable Franchise Fee) 

Transfer from General Fund Undesignated Fund Balance 

Investment Income 

Transfers from Capital Reserves, Trust Funds and Other 

Reserve Funds 

Other Miscellaneous Income 

Total General Fund Sources 





2009-10 


2010-11 






2008-09 YTD 


Approved 


Proposed 






Actuals 


Biuret 


Budget 


% Incr 


S Incr 



7,165,942 


7,486,876 


7,794,321 


4.1% 


307,445 


1,215,230 


1,213,750 


1,223,750 


0.8% 


10,000 


895,652 


954,922 


948,151 


-0.7% 


(6,771) 


1,017,680 


966,160 


766,282 


-20.7% 


(199,878) 


364,080 


297,678 


380,800 


27.9% 


83,122 


153,959 


236,270 


158,748 


-32.8% 


(77,522) 


- 


- 


2,000 


- 


2,000 


134,724 


215,115 


140,115 


-34.9% 


(75,000) 



436,844 
134,894 



322,661 
193,963 



473,759 
184,447 



11,519,005 11,887,395 12,072,374 



46.8% 
-4.9% 



151,098 
(9,516) 



1.6% 184,980 



Uses (w/Allocation of Facilities, Fringe Benefits and Other Costs) 



Public Works 


3,990,417 


4,144,425 


4,291,384 


3.5% 


146,959 


Police Department 


2,839,540 


2,827,685 


2,920,111 


3.3% 


92,426 


General Town Government 


1,879,696 


1,968,680 


2,030,741 


3.2% 


62,062 


Libraries 


1,377,716 


1,429,317 


1,486,826 


4.0% 


57,509 


Parks & Recreation 


883,723 


928,781 


946,962 


2.0% 


18,181 


Other Town Functions 


403,528 


588,508 


396,349 


-32.7% 


(192,159) 


Replenish Fund Balance (from Emergency Road Repairs) 


52,500 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total General Fund Uses 


11,427,120 


11,887,395 


12,072,374 


1.5% 


184,980 


Fire Fund 













Sources 

Fire District Taxes 

Hydrant Rentals (Pymts from Users of Private Hydrants) 

Transfer from Fire Fund Undesignated Fund Balance 

Federal, State and Other Grants 

Charges for Services (e.g., Fire Alarms, Special Detail) 

Other Income 

Transfers from Capital and Other Reserve Funds 

Total Fire Fund Sources 

Uses 

Salaries and Benefits 

Hydrant Rentals (transfer to Water Fund) 

Fire Suppression 

Fire Apparatus and Vehicle Replacement 

Facilities Costs (Main and Etna Fire Stations) 

Administration (includes G&A Overhead Allocation) 

Hazardous Materials 

Alarm Maintenance 

Total Fire Fund Uses 



2,645,081 


2,500,142 


2,513,711 


0.5% 


13,569 


137,721 


141,568 


146,621 


3.6% 


5,053 


- 


100,000 


150,000 


50.0% 


50,000 


93,965 


48,000 


- 


-100.0% 


(48,000) 


19,310 


24,400 


23,100 




(1,300) 


16,756 


16,100 


8,200 


-49.1% 


(7,900) 


2,912,833 


2,830,210 


2,841,632 


0.4% 


11,422 


1,534,676 


1,671,963 


1,710,015 


2.3% 


38,052 


649,038 


652,287 


656,546 


0.7% 


4,259 


289,312 


285,150 


256,898 


-9.9% 


(28,253) 


147,736 


106,236 


107,236 


0.9% 


1,000 


63,611 


63,222 


54,022 


-14.6% 


(9,200) 


33,324 


38,762 


47,095 


21.5% 


8,333 


4,419 


8,600 


6,350 


-26.2% 


(2,250) 


3,370 


3,990 


3,470 


-13.0% 


(520) 


2,725,486 


2,830,210 


2,841,632 


0.4% 


11,422 



25 



Town of Hanover - Recast Budget Summary - Functional Presentation 





2009-10 


2010-11 






2008-09 YTD 


Approved 


Proposed 






Actuals 


Budget 


Budget 


% Incr 


$ Incr 



Ambulance Fund 

Sources 

Service Charges (net of uncollectibles) 

Community Per Capita Contributions 

Transfers from Capital and Other Reserves 

Transfer from Ambulance Fund Undesignated Fund Balance 

Other Income 

Total Ambulance Fund Sources 

Uses 

Salaries and Benefits 

Ambulance and Rescue Vehicle Replacement 

Administration (includes G&A Overhead Allocation) 

Operational Equipment and Supplies 

Total Ambulance Fund Uses 



390,078 
279,465 

3,536 


352,000 
290,045 
161,000 

25,730 
3,300 


331,000 
291,288 

16,100 
3,300 


-6.0% 

0.4% 

-100.0% 

-37.4% 

0.0% 


(21,000) 
1,243 
(161,000) 
(9,630) 


673,079 


832,075 


641,688 


-22.9% 


(190,387) 


431,583 
44,000 

133,313 
22,575 


435,192 

235,480 

138,253 

23,150 


444,183 
47,000 

128,915 
21,590 


2.1% 

-80.0% 

-6.8% 

-6.7% 


8,991 
(188,480) 
(9,338) 
(1,560) 


631,470 


832,075 


641,688 


-22.9% 


(190,387) 



Water Reclamation Facility (Sewer) Fund 

Sources 

Sewer Usage Billings 

Sewer Connection Fees 

Outside Projects 

NH DES Grant-in-Aid 

Septage Tipping Fees 

Transfers from Capital Reserves 

Transfer from WRF Fund Undesignated Fund Balance 

Other Income 

State Revolving Fund to Finance Plant Upgrades 

Total WRF Fund Sources 

Uses 

Plant Improvements - Capital Investment 
Plant Operations 
Salaries and Benefits 
Outside Project Work 
Total WRF Fund Uses 

Water Utility Fund 
Sources 

Metered Water Billings 

Total Water Fund Sources 

Uses 

Plant Improvements - Capital Expenditures (incl. Debt Svc.) 

Salaries and Benefits 

Plant Operations 

Total Water Fund Uses 



2,090,777 


2,167,257 


2,191,066 


1.1% 


23,809 


377,652 


95,260 


42,430 


-55.5% 


(52,830) 


26,429 


50,000 


50,000 


0.0% 


- 


48,837 


48,396 


47,381 


-2.1% 


(1,015) 


23,390 


27,400 


27,400 


0.0% 


- 


91,965 


- 


1,700,000 


- 


1,700,000 


- 


- 


300,000 


- 


300,000 


6,398 


6,000 


6,000 


0.0% 


- 


2,665,447 


2,394,313 


4,364,277 


82.3% 


1,969,964 


907,701 


826,672 


2,768,672 


234.9% 


1,942,000 


968,261 


1,000,998 


977,795 


-2.3% 


(23,203) 


490,055 


516,643 


567,809 


9.9% 


51,166 


26,429 


50,000 


50,000 


0.0% 


- 


2,392,445 


2,394,313 


4,364,277 


82.3% 


1,969,964 



1,480,330 
1,480,330 



844,923 

436,332 

199,075 

1,480,330 



26 



Town of Hanover - Recast Budget Summary - Functional Presentation 



2009-10 
2008-09 Y TD Approved 
Act u ills Budget 



2010-11 
Proposed 
Budget % Incr 



S Intr 



Parking Fund 

Sources 

Surface Lot and Street Metered and Permit Parking 

Parking Facility Permit, Leased and Short Term Parking 

Parking Fines 

Transfers from Capital Reserve Fund and Other Reserves 

Parking District Tax Levy 

Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District Levy 

Fund Balance Used 

Miscellaneous Revenues 

Total Parking Fund Sources 

Uses 

Parking Facility Capital Costs 

Salaries and Benefits 

Administration & Enforcement 

Advance Transit Shuttle Service, Municipal Contribution 

Parking Facility Operating Costs 

Surface Lot and Street Parking Operating Costs 

Total Parking Fund Uses 

Downtown Business Service District Fund 

Sources 

Downtown Business Service District Tax 

Sponsorship Fees and Other Revenues 

Total Downtown Svc. Dist Fund Sources 



Uses 



511,129 


511,950 


518,895 


1 .4% 


6,945 


495,015 


476,229 


476,400 


0.0% 


171 


386,650 


399,798 


390,000 


-2.5% 


(9,798) 


85,731 


85,000 


85,000 


0.0% 




- 


270,000 


228,965 


-15.2% 


(41,035) 


297 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,478,823 


1,742,977 


1,699,260 


-2.5% 


(43,716) 


401,416 


651,011 


565,499 


-13.1% 


(85,512) 


394,972 


405,235 


441,123 


8.9% 


35,888 


308,707 


305,854 


258,603 


-15.4% 


(47,251) 


191,883 


201,478 


228,112 


13.2% 


26,634 


98,200 


120,833 


148,849 


23.2% 


28,016 


60,783 


58,566 


57,076 


-2.5% 


(1,490) 


1.455,962 


1,742,977 


1,699,260 


-2.5% 


(43,716) 



Advertising and Commercial Development Initiatives 
Total Downtown Svc. Dist Fund Uses 



50,454 
9,554 


25,000 


25,000 


0.0% 


- 


60,008 


25,000 


25,000 


0.0% 


- 


65,665 


25,000 


25,000 


0.0% 




65,665 


25,000 


25,000 


0.0% 


- 



27 



2010-11 Proposed Budget - Sources of General Fund 

Revenues 




Other Miscellaneous 

Income 

2% 



28 



Transfers from 

Capital Reserves, 

Trust Funds and 

Other Reserve 

Funds 

4% 



State 

Appropriations 

and Federal and 

Other Grants 

6% 



Investment Income 
1% 

Planning & Zoning 

Permits and Fees 

3% 

Other Taxes and 

Related Items (Land 

Use Change Tax, PILT, 

Yield Tax, Cable 

Franchise Fee) 

1% 



2010-11 Proposed Budget - Uses of General Fund 

Resources 




Other Town Functions 
3% 



29 



Town of Hanover - Tax Rates from Proposed Hanover Town Meeting Action 
Information not currently available to reasonably project the School and County tax rates. 





*PROPOSED* 2010 Tax Rate (4/1/10-3/31/11) 


2009 Tax 


Rate (4/1/09-3/31/10) 




Net Valuation Tax Levy 


Rate 


% Incr 


Net Valuation 


Tax Levy 


Rate 


Town Funds 


1,962,340,600 7,794,321 


3.97 


0.30% 


1,937,340,600 


7,673,278 


3.96 


General Municipal Tax Rate 


Fire District #1 


tbd 2,003,562 


1.41 


-2.76% 


1,392,411,900 


2,007,702 


1.45 


Fire District #2 


tbd 490,287 


0.96 


4.35% 


532,044,400 


486,607 


0.92 


Fire District #3 


tbd 6,293 


0.48 


4.35% 


12,884,300 


5,833 


0.46 


)owntown Business Svc. Dist. 


tbd 25,000 


0.20 


0.00% 


126,194,000 


25,000 


0.20 




Combined Fire District #1 


5.38 


-0.52% 






5.41 


Combined Fire District M/Central Business District 


5.58 


-0.50% 






5.61 




Combined Fire District #2 


4.93 


1.06% 






4.88 




Combined Fire District #3 


4.45 


0.72% 






4.42 



Note: These tax rates are estimates only; the final tax rate will be set in early Oct 2010 by the NH Dept of Revenue Admin. 

In budget adoption discussions, the Board of Selectmen considered a composite average property tax rate in an attempt to net out the impact of 
the 5-year transitioning to the new Fire Districts. If the total tax levy for the General Fund and the Fire Fund was recovered from all properties on 
the same basis (i.e., disregarding Fire Districts), this tax rate would be: ^^_^^^ ^^_^^^ 

20 1 Tax Year | 5.25 | 2009 Tax Year | 5.25 | 



30 



Town of Hanover - 10 Year Tax Rate History of Municipal, School and County Combined Tax Rates 



Fire District #1 (Properties Serviced by Fire Hydrants) 



( A ) 

(*) 
(+) 



Tax Rate Breakdown 







Change in Valuation 


ear 


Taxable Valuation 


from Previous Year 


2009 


1,937,340,600 


38,747,400 


2008 


1,898,593,200 


366,842,500 


2007 


1,531,750,700 


37,983,000 


2006 


1,493,767,700 


52,267,300 


2005 


1,441,500,400 


19,594,500 


2004 


1,421,905,900 


18,611,800 


2003 


1,403,294,100 


557,544,300 


2002 


845,749,800 


22,401,000 


2001 


823,348,800 


25,045,700 


2000 


798,303,100 


21,617,000 





% Increase 














from 












Tax Rate 


Previous 




Fire 








per $1,000 
17.43 


Year 

3.7% 


Town 


District 


County 


School 


State Ed 


3.96 


1.45 


1.32 


8.55 


2.15 


16.81 


-17.0% 


3.78 


1.61 


1.37 


7.89 


2.16 


20.25 


5.4% 


4.58 


1.95 


1.57 


9.35 


2.80 


19.21 


3.4% 


4.31 


2.00 


1.44 


8.53 


2.93 


18.57 


2.8% 


3.76 


1.92 


1.51 


8.44 


2.94 


18.07 


0.7% 


3.64 


1.78 


1.47 


7.83 


3.35 


17.94 


-36.3% 


3.50 


1.73 


1.52 


7.08 


4.11 


28.16 


3.2% 


5.54 


2.71 


2.13 


10.92 


6.86 


27.30 


5.7% 


5.40 


2.62 


1.94 


10.16 


7.18 


25.84 


4.0% 


5.22 


2.56 


1.74 


9.15 


7.17 



(*) 



( A ) State Revenue Sharing eliminated to address State budget deficit - Town Property Tax rate increased by $.10 to address lost revenues. 

(*) Revaluation Year 

(+) Fire Districts Reconfigured 




12.00 



10.00 



8.00 



6.00 



4.00 



2.00 



Pre District 

■ County 

■ Town 

■ State Ed 

■ School 



2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 



31 



Town of Hanover - 10 Year Tax Rate History of Municipal, School and County Combined Tax Rates 



Fire District #2 (Properties w/o Hydrant- West of Moose Mtn) 



( A ) 

(*) 
(+) 



Tax Rate Breakdown 







Change in Valuation 


Year 


Taxable Valuation 


from Previous Year 


2009 


1,937,340,600 


38,747,400 


2008 


1,898,593,200 


366,842,500 


2007 


1,531,750,700 


37,983,000 


2006 


1,493,767,700 


52,267,300 


2005 


1,441,500,400 


19,594,500 


2004 


1,421,905,900 


18,611,800 


2003 


1,403,294,100 


557,544,300 


2002 


845,749,800 


22,401,000 


2001 


823,348,800 


25,045,700 


2000 


798,303,100 


21,617,000 





% Increase 














from 












Tax Rate 


Previous 




Fire 








per $1,000 
16.90 


Year 

5.2% 


Town 


District 


County 


School 


State Ed 


3.96 


0.92 


1.32 


8.55 


2.15 


16.06 


-16.8% 


3.78 


0.86 


1.37 


7.89 


2.16 


19.30 


7.0% 


4.58 


1.00 


1.57 


9.35 


2.80 


18.04 


3.6% 


4.31 


0.83 


1.44 


8.53 


2.93 


17.41 


2.4% 


3.76 


0.76 


1.51 


8.44 


2.94 


17.00 


0.8% 


3.64 


0.71 


1.47 


7.83 


3.35 


16.86 


-36.3% 


3.50 


0.65 


1.52 


7.08 


4.11 


26.47 


3.2% 


5.54 


1.02 


2.13 


10.92 


6.86 


25.66 


5.8% 


5.40 


0.98 


1.94 


10.16 


7.18 


24.26 


3.7% 


5.22 


0.98 


1.74 


9.15 


7.17 



(*) 



( A ) State Revenue Sharing eliminated to address State budget deficit - Town Property Tax rate increased by $.10 to address lost revenues. 

(*) Revaluation Year 

(+) Fire Districts Reconfigured 




12.00 



10.00 



8.00 



6.00 



4.00 



2.00 



Fire District 

■ County 

■ Town 

m state Ed 

■ School 



2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 



32 



MH^Cui 



Melanson Heath & Company, pc 

Certipidu Public Accountants 
MaNAOIMINI AlivisokS 



i os Ptftftnewr Road 

Nashua, NH 03063-130/ 

Tel (603; 883-1 111 • Fa* (603) 883-9456 

www. melansonhealh.com 



INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 



To the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager 
Town of Hanover, New Hampshire 

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental 
activities, each major fund, and the aggregate remaining fund information of the 
Town of Hanover, New Hampshire, as of and for the year ended June 30, 2009, 
which collectively comprise the Town's basic financial statements as listed in the 
table of contents. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Town 
of Hanover's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these 
financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted 
in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform 
the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements 
are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, 
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An 
audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant esti- 
mates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement 
presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our 
opinions. 

As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, management has not record- 
ed capital assets in its governmental activities and, accordingly, has not recorded 
depreciation expense on those assets. Accounting principles generally accepted 
in the United States of America require that capital assets be capitalized and 
depreciated, which would increase the assets, net assets and expenses of the 
governmental activities. The amount by which this departure would affect the 
assets, net assets and expenses of the governmental activities is not reasonably 
determined. 

In our opinion, because of the effects of the matter discussed in the preceding 
paragraph, the financial statements referred to above do not present fairly, in 
conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States 
of America, the financial position of the governmental activities of the Town of 
Hanover, as of June 30, 2009, and the changes in financial position, thereof for 



AAfownal O/jfrccs: 
Andover, MA • Cnren/ieM, MA * Ellsworth, ME * Mancfasier, NH 



33 



the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted 
in the United States of America. 

In addition, in our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, 
in all material respects, each major fund and the aggregate remaining fund infor- 
mation of the Town of Hanover, as of June 30, 2009, and the respective changes 
in financial position, and the respective budgetary comparison for the General Fund 
for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted 
in the United States of America. 

The management's discussion and analysis, appearing on the following pages, is 
not a required part of the basic financial statements but is supplementary informa- 
tion required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of 
America. We have applied certain limited procedures, which consisted principally 
of inquiries of management regarding the methods of measurement and presenta- 
tion of the required supplementary information. However, we did not audit the 
information and express no opinion on it. 

Nashua, New Hampshire 
November 16, 2009 



34 



MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS 



As management of the Town of Hanover, we offer readers this narrative overview 
and analysis of the financial activities of the Town of Hanover for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 2009. 



A. OVERVIEW OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

This discussion and analysis is intended to serve as an introduction to the basic 
financial statements. The basic financial statements are comprised of three 
components: (1) government-wide financial statements, (2) fund financial state- 
ments, and (3) notes to financial statements. This report also contains other 
supplementary information in addition to the basic financial statements them- 
selves. 

Government-wide financial statements . The government-wide financial state- 
ments are designed to provide readers with a broad overview of our finances in 
a manner similar to a private-sector business. 

The statement of net assets presents information on all assets and liabilities, with 
the difference between the two reported as net assets. Over time, increases or 
decreases in net assets may serve as a useful indicator of whether the financial 
position is improving or deteriorating. 

The statement of activities presents information showing how the government's 
net assets changed during the most recent fiscal year. All changes in net assets 
are reported as soon as the underlying event giving rise to the change occurs, 
regardless of the timing of related cash flows. Thus, revenues and expenses are 
reported in this statement for some items that will only result in cash flows in fut- 
ure fiscal periods (e.g., uncollected taxes and earned but unused vacation leave). 

Both of the government-wide financial statements distinguish functions that are 
principally supported by taxes and intergovernmental revenues (governmental 
activities) from other functions that are intended to recover all or a significant 
portion of their costs through user fees and charges (business-type activities). 
The governmental activities include general government, public safety, highways 
and streets, sanitation, and culture and recreation. 

Fund financial statements . A fund is a grouping of related accounts that is 
used to maintain control over resources that have been segregated for specific 
activities or objectives. Fund accounting is used to ensure and demonstrate 
compliance with finance-related legal requirements. All of the funds can be 
divided into two categories: governmental funds and fiduciary funds. 

Governmental funds . Governmental funds are used to account for essentially 
the same functions reported as governmental activities in the government-wide 
financial statements. However, unlike the government-wide financial statements, 



35 



governmental fund financial statements focus on near-term inflows and outflows 
of spendable resources, as well as on balances of spendable resources avail- 
able at the end of the fiscal year. Such information may be useful in evaluating 
a government's near-term financing requirements. 

Because the focus of governmental funds is narrower than that of the government- 
wide financial statements, it is useful to compare the information presented for 
governmental funds with similar information presented for governmental activities 
in the government-wide financial statements. By doing so, readers may better 
understand the long-term impact of the government's near-term financing deci- 
sions. Both the governmental fund balance sheet and the governmental fund 
statement of revenues, expenditures and changes in fund balances provide 
a reconciliation to facilitate this comparison between governmental funds and 
governmental activities. 

An annual appropriated budget is adopted for the general fund. A budgetary 
comparison statement has been provided for the general fund to demonstrate 
compliance with this budget. 

Fiduciary funds . Fiduciary funds are used to account for resources held for the 
benefit of parties outside the government. Fiduciary funds are not reflected in the 
government-wide financial statements because the resources of those funds are 
not available to support the Town's own programs. The accounting used for 
fiduciary funds is much like that used for proprietary funds. 

Notes to financial statements . The notes provide additional information that is 
essential to a full understanding of the data provided in the government-wide and 
fund financial statements. 

Other information . In addition to the basic financial statements and accompan- 
ying notes, this report also presents certain required supplementary information 
which is required to be disclosed by accounting principles generally accepted in 
the United States of America. 



B. FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 

• As of the close of the current fiscal year, the total of assets exceeded liabili- 
ties by $ (3,837,567) (i.e., net assets), a change of $ 350,098 in comparison 
to the prior year. 

• As of the close of the current fiscal year, governmental funds reported com- 
bined ending fund balances of $ 6,807,394, a change of $ 224,370 in com- 
parison with the prior year. 

• At the end of the current fiscal year, unreserved fund balance for the general 
fund was $ 931,371, a change of $ 165,020 in comparison with the prior year. 



36 



• Bonds payable at the close of the current fiscal year was $ 8,045,757, a 
change of $ (363,198) in comparison to the prior year. 

C. GOVERNMENT-WIDE FINANCIAL ANALYSIS 

The following is a summary of condensed government-wide financial data for the 
current and prior fiscal years. 







Governmental 
Activities 






2009 




2008 


Current and other assets 
Total assets 


$ 


23,934,462 
23,934,462 


$ 


23,605,144 
23,605,144 


Long-term liabilities outstanding 
Other liabilities 
Total liabilities 




10,989,573 
16,782,456 
27,772,029 




11,405,830 
16,386,979 
27,792,809 


Net assets: 

Invested in capital assets, net 

Restricted 

Unrestricted 




(8,301,990) 
5,095,758 
(631,335) 




(6,523,087) 
4,396,597 
(2.061,175) 


Total net assets 


$ 


(3,837,567) 


$ 


(4,187,665) 


CHANGES IN NET ASSETS 










Governmental 


Revenues: 
Program revenues 
Charges for services 
Operating grants and 
contributions 
Capital grants and 
contributions 
General revenues: 
Property taxes 
Motor vehicle permit fees 


$ 


2009 

6,777,686 
603,485 

9,384,146 
1.252,578 


$ 


2008 

6,631,156 

691,194 

9,784,582 
1,368,296 

(continued) 



37 



(continued) 



Penalties, interest, and other 

taxes 
Grants and contributions 

not restricted to specific 

programs 
Investment income 
Miscellaneous 

Total revenues 

Expenses: 
General government 
Public safety 
Highway and streets 
Sanitation 

Health and human services 
Culture and recreation 
Miscellaneous 
Interest on long-term debt 

Total expenses 

Change in net assets 
before permanent 
fund contributions 

Permanent fund contributions 
increase in net assets 

Net assets - beginning of 

Net assets - end of year 



119,280 



129,812 



911,154 


1,459,571 


131,438 


485,501 


97,048 


78,651 


19,276,815 


20,628,763 


4,384,585 


4,237,044 


6,523,455 


6,064,334 


2,853,248 


2,574,855 


2,726,091 


4,427,590 


280,495 


266,434 


1,552,951 


1,353,960 


238,031 


246,314 


406,413 


296,419 



18,965,269 



311,546 
38,552 



350,098 
(4,187,665) 



19,466,950 



1,161,813 

20,784 
1,182,597 

(5,370,262) 



$ (3,837,567) $ (4,187,665) 



As noted earlier, net assets may serve over time as a useful indicator of a 
government's financial position. At the close of the most recent fiscal year, 
total net assets were $ (3,837,567), a change of $ 350,098 from the prior year. 

Invested in capital assets is the largest portion of net assets and reflects a 
negative balance of $ (8,301,990). This negative balance resulted because the 
Town does not record capital assets (e.g., land, buildings, machinery, equip- 
ment, and infrastructure) in the financial statements. Capital assets are used 
to provide services to citizens; consequently, these assets are not available for 
future spending. Although the investment in capital assets is reported net of 
related debt, it should be noted that the resources needed to repay this debt 
must be provided from other sources, since the capital assets themselves can- 
not be used to liquidate these liabilities. 



38 



An additional portion of net assets $ 5,095,758 represents resources that are 
subject to external restrictions on how they may be used. The remaining bal- 
ance of unrestricted net assets $ (631,335), if it were positive, may be used 
to meet the government's ongoing obligations to citizens and creditors. 

Governmental activities . Governmental activities for the year resulted in a 
change in net assets of $ 350,098. Key elements of this change are as follows: 

General fund operations, as discussed further 

in section D $ 9,020 

Water reclamation fund activity 3,149 

Nonmajor fund activity 212,201 

Principal debt service payments 534,491 

Other (408,763) 

Total $ 350,098 



D. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS OF THE GOVERNMENT'S FUNDS 

As noted earlier, fund accounting is used to ensure and demonstrate compliance 
with finance-related legal requirements. 

Governmental funds . The focus of governmental funds is to provide infor- 
mation on near-term inflows, outflows and balances of spendable resources. 
Such information is useful in assessing financing requirements. In particular, 
unreserved fund balance may serve as a useful measure of a government's net 
resources available for spending at the end of the fiscal year. 

As of the end of the current fiscal year, governmental funds reported combined 
ending fund balances of $ 6,807,394, a change of $ 224,370 in comparison with 
the prior year. Key elements of this change are as follows: 

General fund expenditures and transfers out 

in excess of revenues and transfers in $ 9,020 

Water reclaimation fund activity 3,149 

Nonmajor fund activity 212,201 

Total $ 224,370 

The general fund is the chief operating fund. At the end of the current fiscal year, 
unreserved fund balance of the general fund was $ 931,371, while total fund 
balance was $ 1 ,293,667. As a measure of the general fund's liquidity, it may be 
useful to compare both unreserved fund balance and total fund balance to total 
fund expenditures. Unreserved fund balance represents 8.22 percent of total 
general fund expenditures, while total fund balance represents 11.42 percent of 
that same amount. 



39 



The fund balance of the general fund changed by $ 9,020 during the current 
fiscal year. Key factors in this change are as follows: 

Revenues in excess of budget $ (425,129) 

Expenditures less than budget 586,493 

Other timing issues (152,344) 

Total $ 9,020 

E. GENERAL FUND BUDGETARY HIGHLIGHTS 

There were no differences between the original budget and the final budget. _ 

F. CAPITAL ASSET AND DEBT ADMINISTRATION 

Long-term debt . At the end of the current fiscal year, total bonded debt 
outstanding was $ 8,045,757, all of which was backed by the full faith and 
credit of the government. 

Additional information on long-term debt can be found in the footnotes to the 
financial statements. 



REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION 

This financial report is designed to provide a general overview of the Town of 
Hanover's finances for all those with an interest in the government's finances. 
Questions concerning any of the information provided in this report or requests 
for additional financial information should be addressed to: 

Director of Administrative Services 

Town of Hanover 

P.O. Box 483 

Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 

(603) 640-3203 



40 



tt * fe * K « 

I If §'*" 



CI ^ ■* « tb ^t 

IO Mffl JON « . 

C{ V N Mt- © N 

35 o m cd 

tN V CM* 



8 



3* 



r(0» S 

r- c> c*> <o 
rt <n tp P. 




8 


331. 

634 

130, 

76, 


o 

GO 


US 

Si 


v 


to 


<o" 



o> 


t*. 


* 




*5 


<n 


CO 


tO 


os 




id 


r»* 


s 


C\J 


? 


EN 




us 






O N- 


n. 


* 


CO to 


°> 


^ 


to r*. 


55 


rt 








O CO 




f-" 


« F> 




o 


i" 


cl 


■* 




us" 


us 



sis 

9 ~ 5 

5 -Sill 



8 8 



* 
?" 



t 



"- in 



X 
(0 

LiJ 

o 



5S8 

r* *% *- 



rt S 5 3 f\J 
©_ ^, r-, ?> v, 
V cj" «N (P os 

*- to to c> r- 
■v o o> to 



E?S 



1*- 


CM 


i£ 


V 


ai 


fl? 


Ol 


r*- 


CM 


^ 




o" 




215 3 

H JS S ■f 9 II « F 

cSc*>c5a.E 
a* a. <v JS ® »■ « 5 






41 



Town of Hanover Statement of General Indebtedness FY 2008-09 
Projected Balances Due - including Principal and Interest 



General Fund 

2002 Police Dispatch Console Bond 

2003 Community Center Bond 

2004 Dresden Note for HHS Property Option 

2005 Financial Administration Software 

2006 Ntwk Copier Lease - Planning & Zoning 

2006 Ntwk Copier Lease - Police Department 

2007 Ford F-550 Dumptruck for Trash Hauling 
2007 Ntwk Copier Lease - Parks & Recreation 
2007 Long-Line Painter - Public Works 

2007 Town-Wide IP Telephone Switch 

2008 Networked Copier Lease - Town Hall 
2008 Networked Copier Lease - Public Works 
Total General Fund 

Fire Fund 

2006 Ntwk Copier Lease - Fire Department 

2007 E- 1 Aerial Tower - Fire Department 
Total Fire Fund 





Balance Due @ 


FY2008-09 Debt 


FY2008-09 Debt 


Balance Due @ 


Matures 


7/1/2008 


Service 


Payments 




Incurred 


6/30/2009 


6/14/2012 $ 


66,206 


$ 


(17,456) 


$ 


_ 


$ 48,750 


1/15/2023 


1,538,140 




(125,288) 




- 


1,412,852 


8/15/2023 


1,600,000 




(100,000) 




- 


1,500,000 


4/15/2009 


6,425 




(6,425) 




- 


- 


8/31/2010 


5,070 




(2,340) 




- 


2,730 


12/31/2010 


6,600 




(2,640) 




- 


3,960 


11/20/2010 


36,940 




(12,314) 




- 


24,627 


1/31/2012 


16,603 




(4,633) 




- 


11,970 


6/15/2011 


30,578 




(10,193) 




- 


20,385 


6/30/2012 


46,774 




(20,384) 




84,541 


110,931 


8/31/2011 


9,701 




(3,063) 




- 


6,638 


8/31/2011 


6,383 




(2,016) 




- 


4,367 


$ 


3,369,420 


$ 


(306,752) 


$ 


84,541 


$ 3,147,209 


8/31/2010 


5,070 




(2,340) 




. 


2,730 


10/3/2015 


337,885 




(42,236) 




- 


295,649 



342,955 $ 



(44,576) $ 



298,379 



Water Reclamation Facility (Sewer) Fund 

Aid received to apply against debt service) 
2009 Networked Copier Lease - Treatment Plant 
Total Water Reclamation Facility Fund 



12/1/2027 
10/31/2012 



4,046,550 



4,046,550 



(248,656) 
(1,206) 



(249,862) $ 



7,236 



7,236 $ 



3,797,894 
6,030 



3,803,924 



Parking Fund 

1999 Parking Facility Bond 

Total Outstanding Indebtedness All Funds 



1/15/2029 





6,865,240 


(326,502) 


- 


6,538,738 


$ 


14,624,164 $ 


(1,222,129) $ 


99,014 $ 


17,890,554 



42 



Town of Hanover Trust Funds 



Common Trust Funds 

Cemeteries 
Library 
Poor 

Schools (*) 
Subtotal Common Trust Funds 



7/1/2008 




Ret 


di/.ed and 








6/30/2009 


Market Value 




Unrealized 








Market Value- 


Balance 


Income 


Ga 


in (l ir.-.i 


Deposits 


Withdrawals 


Balance 


$ 125,011 $ 


3,581 


$ 


(22,027) $ 


- 


$ 


(3,497) 


S 103,068 


1,676 


48 




(295) 


- 




(47) 


1,382 


256 


7 




(45) 


- 




(7) 


211 


10,538 


225 




(2,731) 


- 




(8,032) 


- 



$ 137,481 S 



3,861 $ 



(25,098) $ 



(11,583) S 



104,661 



Capital Reserve Funds 

Ambulance Equipment 
Bridge Replacement and Renovations 
Building Maintenance and Improvements 
Dispatch Center Eqpt. and Renovations 
Fire Department Vehicle and Equipment 
Highway Construction and Mtce. Eqpt. 
Howe Library Bldg Repair and Equipment 
Parking Vehicles and Facility Improvements 
Police Vehicles and Equipment 
Property Revaluation 
Road Construction and Improvements 
Sewer Eqpt. and Facilities Improvements 
Municipal Transportation Improvement Fund 
Subtotal Capital Reserve Funds 



94,529 
68,654 

49,235 

120,159 

131,863 

28,805 

346,471 

156,846 

1,473 

8,858 

232,553 

6,956 



1,039 $ 

754 

5 

541 

1,320 

1,449 

317 

3,807 

1,723 

16 

97 

2,555 

79 



44,000 
60,000 
50,000 

105,500 
240,000 

22,160 

76,170 
10,000 

567,080 
35,135 



(20,000) 
(180,705) 

(221,500) 



(91,965) 
(3,650) 



139,568 

129,408 

50,005 

29,776 

226,979 

192,607 

29,122 

372,438 

13,239 

11,489 

8,955 

710,223 

38,520 



1,246,402 $ 



13,702 $ 



1,210,045 $ (517,820) S 1,952,329 



Restricted Purpose Funds 

Bridgman Trust Fund (*) 
Bruce Essay Prize (+) 
Dagmar's Place Fund 
Education of Persons with Disabilities Fd. (*) 
Etna Library Expendable Fund 
Fierro Fire Deptartment Memorial Fund 
Adelaide Hardy Trust for Etna Library 
Jeremiah Ice Hockey Fund (+) 
Land & Capital Improvements Fund 
Murphy Lamp of Learning Prize Fund (+) 
Norris Dartmouth Cemetery Fund 
Pleasant St. View and Slope Mtce. Fund 
Rennie Nursing Service Fund 
Rueb Photography Prize Fund (+) 
Sawyer Trust Fund 

School Building Maintenance Fund (*) 
Sixth Grade Tuition Fund (*) 
Tax Stabilization Fund (*) 
Frank B. and Edith R. Tenney Trust 
Termination Benefits Fund 
Welfare Assistance Fund 
Wicker Fdn. Cemetery Improvements Fd. 
Subtotal Restricted Purpose Funds 

*Hanover School District Funds. +Dresden School District Funds 

Grand Total Trust Funds 



1,185,610 

1,384 

12,111 

196 

20,798 

2,602 

38,108 

5,557 

170,857 

1,044 
13,878 
25,831 
11,590 
13,489 
82,957 
53,114 
474,435 
45,132 
88,000 
285 

1,954 



28,855 

40 

350 

2 

233 

28 

1,091 

159 

1,871 

136 

11 

406 

280 

332 

386 

940 

557 

5,248 

1,292 

963 

3 

22 



(213,917) 

(244) 

(2,113) 



(6,715) 
(979) 

(798) 

(2,422) 

(2,042) 
(2,377) 



(7,954) 



200 



7,235 



10,380 
5,000 

500 



25,000 
42,299 



(60,000) $ 
(80) 



(6,495) 



(100) 

(278) 

(26,108) 

(324) 

(377) 

(10,000) 

(52,730) 

(25) 

(288) 



940,548 

1,100 

10,548 

198 

21,771 

2,630 

32,484 

4,737 

183,108 

4,238 

1,055 

12,084 

3 

9,556 

11,121 

98,897 

941 

521,982 

38,445 

88,963 

1,976 



$ 2,248,932 $ 


43,205 $ 


(239,561) $ 


90,614 $ 


(156,805) $ 


1.986.385 




$ 3,632,815 $ 


60,768 $ 


(264,659) $ 


1,300,659 $ 


(686,208) $ 


4,043,375 



43 



Town Treasurer 

The Treasurer of the Town of Hanover for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2009 submits the 
following summary report of receipts and disbursements, and cash and cash equivalents: 

Available Cash Balances 

Operating Cash Balance at July 1, 2008 $ 5,300,1 85 

Plus: FY2008-09 Receipts from All Sources 69,477,212 

Plus: FY2008-09 Interest Earned 109,566 

Less: FY2008-09 Authorized Disbursements <62,134.709> 

Operating Cash Balance at June 30, 2009 $12.752.254 

Short-Term Investments (NH Public Deposit Investment Pool) 

Balance at July 1, 2008 $ 2,639,879 

Plus: FY2008-09 Transfers In -0- 

Plus: FY2008-09 Interest Earned 25,158 

Less: FY2008-09 Transfers Out <869.246> 

Short-Term Investments at June 30, 2009 $ 1.795.791 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Patricia B. Coutermarsh 



Town of Hanover Treasurer 



44 



Hanover Finance Committee 
Comments on Hanover FY11 Proposed Budget 



At its public meeting on March 29, 2010, the Hanover Finance Committee approved the 
following statement: 

Statement on Hanover Town Budget, 2010-11 

At its meeting on March 29, 2010, the Hanover Finance Committee (HFC) unanimously 
endorsed the FY 11 town budget as approved by the Hanover Selectboard at its meeting on 
March 8, 2010. 

The HFC reached this decision after carefully reviewing details of the projected revenues and 
expenditures as presented in the town budget proposal and discussing these details with town 
officers. Representatives of the HFC also attended all of the public meetings held by the Select 
Board in which the budget was discussed and approved. 

Mindful of the very difficult current economic and financial conditions, the HFC commended the 
Selectboard and town officials for their efforts to cut costs while maintaining essential public 
services and equitable wage and salary adjustments. 

William Garrity, Chair 

Tom Blinkhorn 

Peter Christie, Hanover Board of Selectmen Representative 

Kevin Cotter, Hanover School Board Representative 

Kristi Fenner 

Michael Gerling 

John Hochreiter 

Detail 

The Hanover Finance Committee is an appointed body charged to opine on financial matters of 
the Town and Hanover School District. 

The Hanover Board of Selectmen met four times from late February (22, 23, and 25) to early 
March (8) 2010 to review and approve the proposed town budget for FY11 (July 20 10- June 
2011). The public meetings were detailed reviews of individual town departments' budgets, 
concluding with a summary board discussion of and vote on the FY 11 budget. The finance 
committee was briefed by Julia Griffin, Hanover Town Manager, and Betsy McClain, Director of 
Administrative Services, before the process. Finance committee members attended the 
Selectboard meetings. 

The finance committee generally frames its assessment of the impact of the town's budget in 
terms of a "blended tax rate," an artificial rate that incorporates combined general fund and fire 
fund tax rates proportionally distributed across the three fire districts. No property actually sees 
this rate — it is a benchmark for the finance committee and the Selectboard and town 
administration. 

45 



The finance committee supports the general principle that the Selectboard should construct the 
town's budget to meet town needs given reasonable assumptions about revenues, including 
traditional revenues from the state, and not cut the budget merely to anticipate potential state 
impacts or other circumstances wholly out of the town's control. That is, the committee 
recommends that the town's leadership craft budgets to meet the town's needs for services, and 
not make up for other entities' (e.g., the state) issues. The finance committee also feels it is not 
wise to skip expenses in one year just to postpone them to future years. 

The finance committee notes that the Selectboard, in preparing the town's FY 11 budget, was 
attentive to potential stasis or contraction in local revenues given the degraded financial 
environment — for example, building permits and motor vehicle registrations — and the significant 
uncertainties regarding the state's finances — appropriations, revenue sharing, and the town's 
share of rooms and meals taxes. During budget planning, the town administration planned 
multiple budgets incorporating a range of tax rate changes, including 0%. Town administration 
prepared a list of potential expense reductions, grouped in several tiers from least impactful on 
town services to most impactful. 

The finance committee commends the Selectboard and town administration for developing a 
proposed FY1 1 budget, in a calamitous financial environment, that nonetheless includes 
equitable wage and salary increases at negligible additional taxpayer burden. The committee 
specifically recognizes the work of Julia Griffin; Betsy McClain; Penny Hoisington, the 
Executive Assistant; and all the department heads. 

Total proposed FY11 appropriations for the General Fund, the major tax-supported fund, are 
$184,979 more than the current FY10 approved budget, a 1.6% increase. A 0.3% increase in the 
General Fund tax rate is proposed. Growth in the Fire Fund is 0.4%, or $1 1,422. Because there 
are three distinct fire districts, and because FY1 1 is year four of a five-year phase-in of these 
three fire districts, the fire district tax rate impact, and so the overall tax rate, will vary depending 
upon the fire district. 





FY2010 
Approved 


FY2011 
Proposed 


$ 
Change 


% 
Change 


Gross Expenditures 










General Fund 


11,887,395 


12,072,374 


184,979 


1.56% 


Fire Fund 


2,830,210 


2,841,632 


11,422 


0.40% 


Total Appropriations 


14,717,605 


14,914,006 


196,401 


1.33% 












Property Taxes to be 
Raised 










General Fund - Muni Tax 
Levy 


7,673,278 


7,794,321 


121,043 


1.58% 


Fire Tax Levy 


2,500,142 


2,513,711 


13,569 


0.54% 




10,173,420 


10,308,032 


134,612 


1.32% 



46 



The Net Assessed Valuation is projected to increase by $25 million, substantially absorbing the 
projected increase in property taxes to be raised. The budget approved by the Selectboard at its 
March 8 meeting has this implication for tax rates: 



Year Four of Five-Year Phase-in of IN 


ew Fire Districts 




FY2010 


FY2011 


% Chg 


Muni Rate 


3.96 


3.97 


0.25% 


FD #1 Rate 


1.45 


1.41 


-2.76% 


Total 


5.41 


5.38 


-0.55% 


On $490K Property 


$2,650.90 


$2,636.20 


-0.55% 










Muni Rate 


3.96 


3.97 


0.25% 


FD #2 Rate 


0.92 


0.96 


4.35% 


Total 


4.88 


4.93 


1.02% 


On $490K Property 


$2,391.20 


$2,415.70 


1.02% 










Muni Rate 


3.96 


3.97 


0.25% 


FD #3 Rate 


0.46 


0.48 


4.35% 


Total 


4.42 


4.45 


0.68% 


On $490K Property 


$2,165.80 


$2,180.50 


0.68% 










Combined "Blended" Rate - A composite average property tax 
rate as if fire protection costs were recovered the same as general 
fund costs. 




5.25 


5.25 


0.03% 










Note: $490,000 is the median value of a single-family residence 
in the Town of Hanover. 



That is, the blended tax rate increase if the total general fund and fire fund tax levies were 
allocated to all properties at the same rate is 0.03%. This blended increase will impact property 
owners differently, depending upon the fire district designation of their property. The increase is 
negative <0.55%> for Fire District #1 (which includes approximately 70% of the town's 
households), a 1.02% increase for Fire District #2, and a 0.68% increase for Fire District #3. 
These variable percentage changes are driven by a five-year phase-in of a transition to a more 
equitable allocation of the cost of fire department personnel and equipment costs among all town 
properties. After a careful study of the issues, the Board of Selectmen adopted the current fire 
districts in 2007 and stipulated that the tax impact to Fire Districts #2 and #3 be phased-in over a 
five year period to gradually introduce the increased tax burden to residents. 



47 



Notes... 



48 



Chapter 3 



Town 

Department 

Reports 



49 



Town of Hanover Employees 2009 



ADMINISTRATION 

Darlene Cook 
Patricia Coutermarsh 
Sue Girouard 
Julia Griffin 
Penelope Hoisington 
Myra Johnson 
Gloria LaCasse 
Gerald Macy 
Elizabeth McClain 
Karen McCusker 
Elizabeth Meade 
Michael Ryan 
Gail Schaal 
Donna Stender 
Corey Stevens 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Larry Ackerman 
Roger Bradley 
Michael Clark* 
Jared Cook 
Robert Diehm 
Christopher Doolan 
Wayne Dunham 
Jeryl Frankenfield 
Brian Ellstein 
John Emerson 
Michael Gilbert 
Michael Hanchett 
Bertram Hennessy 
Michael Hinsley 
Benjamin LeFebvre 
Scott Letson 
Jeremiah Linehan 
Richard Low 
Joshuah Lounsbury 
Joshua Merriam 
Robert Mousley 
Judith Stevens 
Jeremy Thibeault 
Jay Whitehair 



Job Title Date of Hire 

Receptionist/Assistant Town Clerk 3/1 1/2004 

Accounting Coordinator/Treasurer 9/30/2003 

Financial & Information Analyst 5/23/1994 

Town Manager 8/01/1996 

Executive Assistant 11/25/1996 

Human Resources Director 2/13/2006 

Human Resources Assistant 1 1/26/2007 

Computer Technician 1 0/0 1 /2004 

Director of Administrative Services 4/23/2001 

Accounting Assistant 6/13/2005 

Tax Collector/Director of Town Clerk's Division 5/29/2000 

Director of Assessing 9/0 1 / 1 998 

Senior Center Coordinator 1 0/29/1 990 

Deputy Tax Collector/Assistant Town Clerk 5/2 1 /2007 

MIS and Technology Director 8/16/1999 

Job Title Date of Hire 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 10/08/1996 

Fire Chief 10/09/1969 

Captain 1/06/1975 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 9/13/2005 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 9/27/2007 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 3/14/2004 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 8/15/2006 

Fire Inspector 9/27/2004 

Firefighter/Paramedic 8/13/2006 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 2/07/2007 

Captain 9/10/1998 

Firefighter/Paramedic 5/08/1992 

Captain 3/13/1994 

Captain 8/13/1987 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 7/24/2006 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 9/07/2008 

Firefighter/Paramedic 1/02/2005 

Firefighter/Paramedic 2/26/1998 

Firefighter/EMT 6/30/2009 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 10/03/2008 

Firefighter/Paramedic 2/25/2003 

Administrative Assistant 1 /02/ 1 994 

Captain 3/16/2003 

Firefighter/EMT Intermediate 7/22/2006 



50 



Town of Hanover Employees 

Cont'd... 



LIBRARIES 

Gary Barton 
Charlotte Bernini 
Helen Bircher 
Joanne Blais 
Marilyn Blight 
Jessica Buckey 
Kristina Burnett 
Janice Chapman 
Jayne Costello 
Christine Eickelman 
Mary Gould 
Janice Grady 
Mary Hardy 
Sylvia Jaccaud 
Caroline Ketcham 
Esra Kuehlert 
Mary King 
Susan Leveret 
Mary Lockhart 
Ellen Lynch 
Jere Nelson 
Geraldine North 
Barbara Prince 
Aimee Pritchard* 
Denise Reitsma 
Joan Ridgeway 
Mary Ryan 
Ann Schofield 
Joanne Scobie 
Susan Shadford 
Pamela Smith 
Stephanie Snelling 
Amelia Talbert 
Cynthia Taylor 
Eric Ticehurst 
Caroline Tischbein 
Mary White 
Doreen Williams* 



Job Title Date of Hire 

Youth Services Library Assistant - Part Time 7/05/2005 

Library Assistant I - Part Time 1/01/1 984 

Library Page I - Part Time 4/19/1 999 

Public Services Librarian 4/ 1 0/2000 

Substitute/Circulation Assistant I - Part Time 7/05/2005 

Library Page I - Part Time 6/08/2009 

Circulation Supervisor - Part Time 1/05/1998 

Substitute/Circulation Assistant I- Part Time 1/14/1 998 

Substitute/Circulation Asst. - Etna Library PT 1 1 /03/2008 

Substitute/Circulation Assistant II - Part Time 6/05/2000 

Substitute/Reference Assistant - Part Time 1 /05/2009 

Office and Facility Manager 6/27/1 988 

Senior Public Services Librarian 1/08/1987 

Library Page I - Part Time 3/04/1997 

Library Page I - Part Time 1 0/ 1 0/2007 

Library Page I - Part Time 9/26/2009 

Circulation Assistant II - Etna Library - PT 1 0/04/2004 

Substitute/Circulation Assistant I - Part Time 8/14/2007 

Teen Services Specialist - Part Time 8/1 3/2009 

Assistant Director 9/ 1 4/ 1 992 

Library Page I - Part Time 8/16/2009 

Substitute/Circulation Assistant I - Part Time 1 1/1 7/2000 

Librarian, Etna Library - Part Time 3/03/2000 

Substitute/Circulations Assistant I - Part Time 6/1 6/2008 

Youth Services Librarian 9/08/1 998 

Substitute/Circulation Assistant II - Part Time 8/25/1 993 

Technical Services Assistant 7/22/1996 

Library Assistant II - Part Time 4/06/1984 

Substitute/Circulation Assistant II - Part Time 8/ 1 8/2006 

Public Services Librarian - Part Time 8/05/2008 

Head of Technical Services/Systems Manager 1 / 1 0/ 1 994 

Substitute/Circulation Asst. - Etna Library PT 1 1 /03/2008 

Circulation Assistant I - Part Time 9/21/1 994 

Youth Services Library Assistant - Part Time 6/30/2003 

Library Page II - Part Time 4/0 1 /2000 

Substitute/Circulation Asst. - Etna Library PT 6/20/2007 

Director Howe Library 7/23/2007 

Library Page - Part Time 8/1 8/1 989 



51 



Town of Hanover Employees 

Cont'd... 



PARKS & RECREATION Job Title 



Sherry Colfer 
Elizabeth Burdette 
Nicole Leonard 
Henry Tenney 
Jeanne Vieten 
John Wilmot 



RWB Community Center Facility Manager 

Assistant Director of Parks & Recreation 

After School Program Director 

Director of Parks and Recreation 

Parks & Recreation Center Program Assistant 

Maintenance Worker 



Date of Hire 

8/16/2005 
3/21/2008 
8/18/2008 
7/08/1974 
8/18/2003 
5/02/2007 



PLANNING & ZONING 

Jeffrey Andrews 
Ryan Borkowski 
Judith Brotman 
Jonathan Edwards 
Beth Rivard 
Victoria Smith 



Job Title 

Assistant Building Inspector 
Building Inspector 
Zoning Administrator 
Director of Planning and Zoning 
Administrative Assistant 
Senior Planner 



Date of Hire 

2/14/2006 
2/22/1999 
10/01/1998 
8/31/1998 
4/07/1999 
4/05/1999 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Jeffrey Ballard 
Eric Bates 
Mark Butler 
Lisa Camarra 
Mark Caruso 
Adriane Coutermarsh 
Bernard Cummings 
Dianne Dufresne 
Michael Evans 
Jeffrey Fleury 
Terry Lynn Follensbee 
Daniel Fowler, III 
Nicholas Giaccone 
Daniel Gillis 
Timothy Goodwin 
E. Douglas Hackett 
Ryan Kennett 
Shannon Kuehlwein 
Kevin LaHaye 
Joshua Lee 
David Luther 
Christopher McEwen 
Francis Moran 
Christopher O'Connor 
Patrick O'Neill 



Job Title 

Police Officer 

Detective 

Police Officer 

Communications Officer 

Parking Control Officer 

Administrative Clerk 

Communications Officer 

Communications Officer 

Lieutenant 

Police Officer 

Parking Facility Cashier 

Police Officer 

Police Chief 

Sergeant 

Communications Officer 

Communication Services Coordinator 

Police Officer 

Police Officer 

Communications Officer 

Police Officer 

Sergeant 

Parking Control Officer 

Captain 

Prosecutor 

Lieutenant 



Date of Hire 

6/18/2001 

2/23/1998 

10/16/2006 

11/18/1991 

10/26/1987 

9/10/2007 

8/02/2005 

7/31/2007 

4/15/1991 

10/13/1994 

11/03/2008 

8/21/2008 

8/20/1973 

8/28/1995 

2/17/2000 

7/22/1999 

5/28/2008 

4/07/1998 

10/23/2006 

5/28/2008 

8/20/1990 

12/08/1992 

5/30/1988 

10/04/2004 

1/04/1988 



52 



Town of Hanover Employees 

Cont'd... 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Alan Patterson 
Richard Paulsen 
Marisela Piatt 
Elizabeth Rathburn 
Steven Read 
Bradford Sargent 
David Saturley 
Rolf Schemmel 
Sheryl Tallman 
Matthew Ufford 
Randy Wagoner 



Job Title 

Police Officer 

Police Officer 

Parking Control/Facility Supervisor 

Administrative Secretary 

Police Officer 

Sergeant 

Communications Officer 

Police Officer 

Records Coordinator 

Police Officer 

Communications Officer 



Date of Hire 

3/19/2001 
4/29/2002 
10/05/2000 
9/04/2002 
6/13/1990 
5/08/2000 
2/15/1998 
7/08/2002 
4/28/1997 
3/13/2006 
6/24/1994 



PUBLIC WORKS 

Neal Augustyn 

Francis Austin 

Seth Bean 

Mark Bean 

Christopher Berry 

Leonard Bolduc 

Todd Bragg 

Larry Brown 

James Cadwell 

Michael Chase 

Brandon Corey 

Mark Curulla 

Roger Darisse 

Moses Delphia 

Kimberly Depelteau-Tracey* 

William Desch 

Steven Driscoll 

John Dumas 

David Field 

Donald Foster 

Michael Grady* 

Bernard Hazlett 

Robert Henry, Jr. 

Robert Henry, Sr. 

Terry Jillson 

Peter Kulbacki 

John LaHaye 



Job Title 

Custodian 

Facilities and Fleet Manager 

Wastewater Treatment Assistant 

Stockroom Clerk/Mechanic Assistant 

Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 

Sewer Maint. & Const. Crew Supervisor 

Senior Mechanic 

Light Equipment Operator 

Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 

Operations Manager 

Wastewater Treatment Technician Asst. 

Custodian 

Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 

Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 

Water Quality Technician 

Urban Forester/Grounds Superintendent 

Building Maintenance Technician 

Water Superintendent 

Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 

Fleet Foreman 

Water Distribution Worker 

Water Distribution Worker 

Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 

Grounds Crew Leader 

Administrative Assistant 

Director of Public Works 

Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 



Date of Hire 

1/09/2006 
5/04/1992 
8/13/2001 
2/13/2006 
3/17/2003 
7/11/1986 
7/04/1988 

12/01/2008 
4/21/2008 
5/02/1983 
2/04/2008 
7/31/2006 
8/13/2003 
1/26/2004 
2/09/2009 
1/01/1990 
3/07/2005 
9/21/1998 
4/21/2008 
5/11/1998 
1/05/2005 
9/16/1982 
1/26/2004 
1/01/2007 
7/01/2000 

12/22/1997 
1/27/1997 



53 



Town of Hanover Employees 

Cont'd... 



PUBLIC WORKS 

Susan Love 
John Lusona 
Randall MacDonald 
Kevin MacLean 
James Messier 
Steven Perry 
Wayne Piekarski 
Mark Roper 
Bruce Sanborn 
Richard Scheuer 
Dennis Smith 
Betsy Smith 
Brian Smith 
Raymond Swift 
Matthew Walker 
Donald Ware 



Job Title 

Inventory Control/Data Entry Clerk 
Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 
Highway Operations Supervisor 
Wastewater Treatment Superintendent 
Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 
Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 
Head Custodian 
Wastewater Chief Operator 
Equipment Operator/Highway Maint. Worker 
Wastewater Treatment Technician 
Wastewater Treatment Technician 
Administrative Assistant 
Arborist 

Sewer Maintenance & Construction Worker 
Water Distribution Assistant Supervisor 
Utility Engineer 



Date of Hire 

7/17/2000 
12/27/2006 
3/03/1997 
8/18/2003 
8/14/2003 
5/29/2002 
1/17/2006 
8/28/2006 
4/19/2008 
6/18/2008 
5/09/2000 
5/02/1988 
12/01/2003 
6/15/1987 
7/17/2000 
11/13/2000 



*Employees that left the Town's employment in 2009 



54 



TOWN OF HANOVER 

2010 "MILESTONES" LIST - 20+ YEARS 

***************************************************************** 



# DEPT EMPLOYEE 
YRS HEAD 



DEPARTMENT 



HIRE DATE 



*********************************************************************************************** 



41 1986 ROGER BRADLEY 

37 1994 NICK GIACCONE 

36 1974 HANK TENNEY 

28 BERNARD HAZLETT 

27 MICHAEL CHASE 

26 CHARLOTTE BERNINI 

26 ANN SCHOFIELD 

24 LEONARD BOLDUC 

23 MARY HARDY 

23 RAYMOND SWIFT 

23 MICHAEL HINSLEY 

23 MARK CARUSO 

22 PATRICK O'NEIL 

22 BETSY SMITH 

22 FRANCIS MORAN 

22 JANICE GRADY 

22 TODD BRAGG 

20 WILLIAM DESCH 

20 STEVEN READ 

20 DAVID LUTHER 

20 GAIL SCHAAL 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 10/09/1969 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 8/20/1973 

RECREATION 7/08/1974 

PUBLIC WORKS 9/16/1982 

PUBLIC WORKS 5/02/1983 

HOWE LIBRARY 1/01/1984 

HOWE LIBRARY 4/06/1984 

PUBLIC WORKS 7/1 1/1986 

HOWE LIBRARY 1/08/1987 

PUBLIC WORKS 6/05/1987 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 8/13/1987 
POLICE-PARKING DIVISION 1 0/26/1 987 
POLICE-PARKING DIVISION 1/04/1988 

PUBLIC WORKS 5/02/1988 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 5/30/1988 

HOWE LIBRARY 6/27/1988 

PUBLIC WORKS 7/01/1988 

PUBLIC WORKS 1/01/1990 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 6/13/1990 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 8/20/1990 
RECREATION/SENIOR CTR 1 0/29/1 990 



Number of Employees per Department with Twenty (20) or more years of employment 
with the Town of Hanover: Seven (7) Public Works, Two (2) Fire, Four (4) Howe Library, 
Six (6) Police, and Two (2) Recreation. 



55 



Administrative Services Department 

The Administrative Services Department handles much of the 'back room' financial 
transaction processing in support of the wide range of Town services provided to our 
citizens. The three-person accounting team handles the Accounts Payable, Payroll, 
Accounts Receivable, Cash Receipts, Budget Development, and other general accounting 
and financial reporting duties for the Town. In addition, the Department provides staff 
support to the Trustees of Trust Funds and coordinates the Town's risk management 
program. 

Significant highlights of the past year include: 



• 



With the completion of the MIS wiring project to connect Town facilities via a fiber 
network, departments now have decentralized access to timely financial data. Each 
department has read-only privileges in the Town's accounting system to access real- 
time accounting, payables and purchasing information for their departmental accounts. 

• The Accounting Coordinator was appointed by the Selectmen to serve as Town 
Treasurer and is actively engaged in maximizing short term interest earnings and 
monitoring Town expenditures and receipts. 

• The Accounting Assistant instituted a new series of position numbers in the Payroll 
system to ultimately utilize position budgeting and to improve FTE reporting. 

• Selected Financial Transactions Processed during fiscal year 2009 - 

Payroll Payments to Employees 7,585 direct deposit transfers 

2,120 payroll checks issued 

Accounts Payable Payments 3,809 checks processed to 796 

different vendors 

Staff: Betsy McClain, Director of Administrative Services; Pat Coutermarsh, Accounting 
Coordinator and Treasurer; Karen McCusker, Accounting Assistant. 



Assessing Department Report 

The Assessing Department is responsible for maintaining the Town's property assessment 
records and providing the taxpayers of Hanover with a cost effective property tax system 
that is both fair and equitable. Information on the assessment of property, the abatement 
process, and exemptions is available on the Town's website at www.hanovernh.org or at 
the Assessing Office on the first floor of Town Hall. 

Local Real Estate Market: The local real estate market has softened over the past twelve 
months and depreciation, although slight, has become a factor. This trend followed a 
relatively stable market over the previous two years. Demand for residential homes and 
condominiums remains flat and is not expected to improve in the short term. In fact, 
looking forward, depending on many factors including the direction of the national 
economy, the local real estate market may worsen and depreciation could become a 



56 



significant factor. This would affect all segments of the market: residential, commercial, 
industrial and institutional. 

Average Assessment: The Town's equalization rate for tax year 2009 is 97.2%, which 
means the average assessment in Hanover is at 97.2% of market value as of April 1 , 2009. 
The equalization rate for tax year 2008 was 94.4%; the increase in the ratio between the two 
years is the direct result of a softening of the real estate market over the past 12 months. We 
will continue to monitor this trend very closely over the next twelve months. 

Property Revaluation Program: By state law, providing that the Selectboard does not 
choose to do it sooner, the next revaluation program is scheduled for Tax Year 2013. It will 
be completed, as were the last two programs, primarily by the Assessing staff with help 
from a contract employee/data collector, and it will cost approximately one quarter of what 
it would be if the town contracted with a private company. The first phase of the program, 
property inspections, will begin in the spring of 201 1 and will continue through 2013. It is 
extremely important that the Town continue to take the steps required to maintain and 
improve the accuracy of the current property data. Fair and equitable assessments are the 
goal of any revaluation program and cannot be accomplished without accurate and timely 
properly inspection data. 

Tax Year 2009 
Summary of Assessments 

Land 

Current Use (19,453 Acres) $ 1,769,500 

Conservation Restriction 8,300 

Residential 537,034,300 

Commercial/Industrial 90,929,200 

Total Taxable Land $ 629,741,300 

Buildings 

Residential $ 935,036,100 

Commercial/Industrial 346,207,300 

Total Taxable Buildings $ 1,281,243,400 



Public Utilities 

Water $ 16,499,400 

Electric 11,581,500 

Total Taxable Public Utilities $ 28.080.900 

Total $ 1.939.065.600 

Staff: Michael J. Ryan, Director of Assessing; Sue Girouard, Financial & Information Analyst. 



57 



Etna Library 

The Hanover Town Library, commonly referred to as the Etna Library, has had a busy year 
with preschool story times, holiday programs for children, book groups, author visits and 
summer picnic programs. The historic library building has been carefully tended to with 
repairs to the outer walls and slate roof. 

All of the Etna Library's materials are included on KnowHowe, the online catalog of the 
Howe Library. The library holds a permanent collection of approximately 8,000 books and 
recorded books. In addition, a rotating collection of videos and recorded books is provided 
through the library's participation in the Librarians of the Upper Valley Cooperative. 

The library features current books as well as classic titles for adults. Two window shelves 
hold appealing displays of the new adult fiction and non-fiction titles. For children, the 
picture book and fiction collections include many new titles as well as childhood favorites 
remembered by our adult visitors. The children's nonfiction section contains timely 
information on topics including science, history, crafts, sports and biographies. Shelving 
for the young adult section has recently been increased to allow an enhanced collection of 
teen books. 

Recorded books are popular for both adults and children. These are available both through 
books on cassette/CD and through New Hampshire Downloadable Audio Books. Audios 
can be downloaded either on a home computer or at the library. A circulating MP3 player 
can be borrowed for listening to the recorded books. We welcome you to try this relatively 
new service and are happy to answer questions about the procedure. 

The library has become a popular meeting place for book groups. The Etna Library book 
group, which selects a list of classic and contemporary titles, meets monthly. Reading 
selections and meeting times are announced on the library's webpage 
( www.hanovernh.org/etnalibrary ). In addition, several other book groups use the space for 
their meetings. 

An increasing number of people are discovering that the library is a beautiful, quiet place to 
do internet research or to stop to look at their e-mail. High-speed internet access is offered 
to the public through the public terminal and also through wireless internet connection. 

The library staff welcomes requests for books not in the library's collection. A courier 
service allows patrons to place a reserve on an item at either Howe or Etna Library and to 
choose where they would like to pick it up. Books, audios and videos can also be borrowed 
from other libraries in New Hampshire or elsewhere in the United States. 

Directions, library hours and programs at the Etna Library are publicized on its webpage. 
Children's programs included story times for preschoolers, seasonal events for school-age 
children and the summer reading program. Stories and Art for young children is held twice 
a week at the Etna Library - Tuesday and Friday mornings at 1 0. Additional programs for 
children of all ages included Halloween, Winter Holiday, Valentines and Lunar New Year 
craft parties. 

During the summer of 2009, Etna Library presented a full day program celebrating the 
birthday of Henry David Thoreau. D.B. Johnson and Linda Michelin presented their new 
book Henry 's Night; Folk singer Terry Kitchen played and sang; Kurt Feuer read from 
Walden, accompanied by musicians Daniel Lynch and Bernard Waugh. In two additional 
programs at the Etna Library, artists guided children creating artwork. Karel Hayes, NH 

58 



Slimmer Reading Program Artist, demonstrated her writing and illustration of the book The 
Adventures of Lucky the Lobster Buoy. Artist/librarian Nilda Gomez led children in using 
watercolors. Stories and Art for the Whole Family, a program of books and crafts for 
children of all ages, was presented weekly throughout the summer. 

In Spring 2009, Dr. Robyn Jacobs talked to adults on the topic of "Taking Control of Your 
Health". In the Fall, Geraldine North presented "Making Animals with Wool", a rug 
hooking program for children and adults. 

This year, the Etna Library Board of Trustees combined the annual Mud Season Reading 
Program with a "Community Read" of the title The Surrogate Thief by Archer Mayor. 
Throughout March and into mid-April, readers were invited to review a book they had 
recently read. Review slips were posted on the library bulletin board and used as raffle 
tickets. In the finale to the program, Archer Mayor discussed his experience and writing. 

The Etna Library extends grateful thanks to all of the dedicated volunteers who have shared 
their time with the library this year. On Saturday mornings, volunteers staff the library. 
Every week-day, volunteer couriers deliver books between Howe and Etna Libraries. 
Volunteers run two annual activities - the June Book Sale and the Thanksgiving Pie Sale. 
The Pie Sale is a delightful product of the generosity of the Etna Ladies Aid and the Etna 
Library volunteers. 



Barbara Prince, Librarian 



Hanover Town Library 
Performance Indicators 





FY 2004 


FY 2005 


FY 2006 


FY 2007 


FY2008 


FY2009 


Total Circulation 


8,920 


10,124 


9,922 


9,745 


8,696 


9,168 


Adult Circulation 


3,987 


4,745 


4,780 


4,505 


4,197 


4,421 


Juvenile Circulation 


4,658 


5,379 


5,142 


5,240 


4,499 


4,747 


Patron Visits 


4,729 


4,574 


4,568 


4,344 


4,386 


4,938 


Adults 


2,838 


2,907 


2,901 


2,730 


2,771 


3,281 


Children 


1,891 


1,667 


1,667 


1,615 


1,615 


1,657 


Library Programs 


114 


118 


107 


126 


122 


121 


Program Attendance 


1,985 


1,487 


1,393 


1,433 


1,466 


1,452 


Volunteer Hours 


187 


128 


138 


165 


134 


131 


Registered Patrons 


234 


256 


256 


228 


242 


249 


Hours Open Weekly 


20 


20 


24 


24 


24 


24 



Library Hours: 28 per week 

Monday - 2:00 to 7:00; Tuesday - 9:00 to 2:00; Wednesday - 2:00 to 6:00; Thursday - 2:00 
to 7:00; Friday - 9:00 to 4:00; Saturday - 10:00 to noon. Closed Sunday. For more 
information, please call the library at 643-31 16 or e-mail etna.library@hanovernh.org . 

Staff: Barbara Prince, Librarian; Mary King, Library Assistant. 



59 



Fire Department 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Hanover Fire Department is to protect life, property and the environment 
and to reduce pain and suffering encountered through fire, medical and environmental 
emergencies by providing education, prevention, suppression and medical services to the 
citizens and visitors of our community in a professional and fiscally responsible manner. 

The Hanover Fire Department is a combination department, meaning that we have full-time 
paid members and we have paid call members, more commonly called volunteers. We are 
short staffed with volunteers and encourage anyone with an interest in serving the 
community to get in touch with us to explore opportunities with the department. 

Firefighter/Paramedic Jeremy Thibeault was promoted to the rank of Captain to fill the 
vacancy left by Captain Michael Clark's retirement in March 2009. 

During the past year, Robert Mousley and Jeremiah Linehan became nationally registered 
Paramedics and are now licensed to practice at the advanced level. 

After nearly twelve years of service to the Town, Firefighter/Paramedic Richard Low II 
resigned to pursue an employment opportunity in the private sector in Florida. 

This past Fall, our EMT's were trained in the administration of the H1N1 flu vaccinations 
and have been working at several regional flu clinics. 

We take this opportunity to thank the citizens of Hanover for your support so that we can 
continue to serve you in your time of need. 




Fire at 5 Webster Avenue 



Firefighters: 
Scott Letson, Capt. Jeremy Thibeault, 
Joshua Merriam and Jared Cook 



60 



Fire Services 

FY'08 FY'09 7/09-01/10 



Structure Fires 
Vehicle Fires 
Brush Fires 
Trash/Dumpster 
Spills or Leaks 
Electrical Problems 
Water Evacuations 
Smoke Removal 
Smoke Odor 
Malicious False Alarms 
Mutual Aid Provided 
Alarm Malfunctions 
Unintentional Alarms 
Other* 

Total 



14 


21 


11 


7 


2 


] 


2 


6 


2 


3 


9 


3 


39 


20 


5 


49 


52 


15 


13 


13 


8 


4 


1 


1 


22 


13 


8 


9 


9 


7 


17 


25 


9 


93 


102 


96 


289 


288 


157 


91 


155 


95 


652 


716 


418 



Includes: Salvage, Police Assistance, Steam Leaks, Elevator Malfunctions, Service Calls, Rescue Calls and 
Extrication 



Emergency Medical Services 



FY'08 


FY'09 


7/09-01/10 


778 


763 


408 


98 


91 


57 


128 


149 


81 


51 


68 


44 


1.055 


1.071 


590 



Hanover 
Lyme 
Norwich 
Mutual Aid 

Total 



Full-time Staff: Roger Bradley, Fire Chief; Michael Gilbert, Bertram Hermessy, Michael 
Hinsley and Jeremy Thibeault, Fire Captains; Judy Stevens, Administrative Assistant; Larry 
Ackerman, Jared Cook, Robert Diehm, Christopher Doolan, Wayne Dunham, John 
Emerson, Benjamin Lefebvre, Scott Letson, Joshuah Lounsbury, Joshua Merriam, Jay 
Whitehair, Firefighter/EMTs; Brian Ellstein, Michael Hanchett, Jeremiah Linehan, Robert 
Mousley, Firefighter/Paramedics. 

Part-time Staff: Jeryl Frankenfield, Fire Prevention Inspector 

Call Firefighters: Richard Baughman, Julie Bean, Timothy Bent, Glenn Elder, John 
Hochreiter, Shannon Kuehlwein, Troy Leatherman, David Pelton, Kenneth Pelton. 



61 




Mission: 

T~Ff~\\A/~F \ Howe Library brings together people, resources and information 

library/ to en S a S e our minds and to strengthen connections 

to our community and the world. 




2009 began with Mary Ryan, Technical Services Assistant, moving to full-time 
employment after working part-time since 1994. Howe Library now has eight full-time 
staff and 16 part-time staff, equaling 14.2 full-time equivalents (FTEs). While the number 
of staff has remained relatively stable over the years, with only a 2.2 FTE increase in 21 
years, library use continues to climb. Since 2001 our circulation has increased 20%, the 
number of programs and program attendance have both increased by 37%, and reference 
questions have increased 27%. Detailed performance indicators are listed on the next page. 

Last year a new museum pass lending program was created thanks to a generous donation 
to The Howe Library Corporation. This donor contributed additional funds in 2009 so that 
we could add two more museums to our offerings. We now provide free or reduced cost 
passes to ten New England museums: Boston Children's Museum, Christa McAuliffe 
Planetarium, Currier Museum of Art, ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Eric 
Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, Isabella Stewart 
Gardner Museum, Mass MOCA, Museum of Fine Arts, and Vermont Institute of Natural 
Science. 

For the third consecutive year Howe Library received a $10,000 donation from the Sunup 
Foundation in memory of Joy Lange Boardman, a long-time library volunteer. The 2009 
gift has been designated for books and a welcome board for Appalachian Trail hikers. You 
might recall that some funds from the 2008 donation were used to purchase four Amazon 
Kindles and this service continues to be extremely popular. 

Collaboration with area libraries continues to be a high priority and Howe Library partnered 
with Dartmouth's Baker-Berry Library, Norwich Public Library and Lebanon Public 
Libraries in May 2009 to host a presentation by award-winning author and illustrator David 
Macaulay. Mr. Macaulay's books, including The Way Things Work, Castle, Pyramid, and 
Cathedral, have sold more than three million copies in the U.S. and have been translated 
into dozens of languages. More than 190 attendees enjoyed hearing our Upper Valley 
neighbor talk about "Building Books: The Art of David Macaulay". Efforts are underway 
for our second lecture, to be held October 24, 2010, with Gregory Maguire, author of 
Wicked and Son of a Witch. 

In 2008 the Howe was awarded a $10,000 grant from The Donley Foundation for teen 
services and in August 2009 Mary Lockhart joined our staff as our first-ever Teen Services 
Specialist. Mary works 1 7 hours each week and offers a variety of programs for teens 
including using digital cameras, gaming, spooky stories, and art programs in collaboration 
with the Hood Museum. Our teen patrons are thriving with Mary's extra attention and 
welcoming personality. Circulation of teen materials has doubled since the completion of 
the 2005 library addition and renovation - from 4,813 in fiscal year 2005 to 9,436 in fiscal 
year 2009. Mary has also created a special High School Corner in the loft that offers books 
of interest to this age group. 

62 



Our first community-wide reading series — "Everyone is Reading" — was held in September 
and October, using the Pulitzer Prize-winning book March by Geraldine Brooks. 
Community members worked for more than one year to create programs for all ages such as 
a "Songs of the Underground Railroad" concert, lectures on New Hampshire and New 
England during the Civil War, a visit to the Alcott homestead, and book discussions. A 
total of 552 people participated in 15 programs. This series was so well received that it will 
become an annual event. The fall 2010 title is Tracy Kidder's newest book, Strength in 
What Remains. 

Mary H. White, Library Director 

Howe Library - a partnership of The Howe Library Corporation and the Town of Hanover 
13 South Street Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 603.643.4120 www.howelibrarv.org 




HOWE 



8 Y, 



Exymtd your world. 



Howe Library 

Performance Statistics 

FY04 - FY09 





2003 - 04 


2004 - 05* 


2005 - 06* 


2006-07 


2007-08 


2008-09 


Items owned 


70,768 


71,321 


73,239 


74,200 


75,439 


77,246 


Circulation, total 


246,396 


233,260 


251,601 


274,817 


282,214 


298,837 


Holds/reserves placed 


9,214 


9,288 


9,536 


11,518 


11,890 


13,390 


Registered patrons 


6,424 


6,857 


6,254 


6,363 


7,471 


7,081 


Resident patrons 


4,936 


5,460 


4,664 


4,614 


4,567 


4,105 


Days open 


337 


332 


329 


329 


336 


335 


Hours open, weekly average 


56 


56 


58 


58 


58 


58 


Visitors, estimated 


202,200 


149,400 


165,300 


197,400 


228,608 


235,200 


Reference questions 


8,924 


8,412 


10,901 


10,681 


10,612 


11,112 


Interlibrary loan transactions 


3,243 


3,103 


2,968 


2,931 


3,270 


3,208 


Library sponsored programs 


275 


350 


492 


499 


518 


573 


Attendance/library programs 


7,263 


6,326 


8,378 


8,195 


7,978 


9,175 


Public meeting room usage 


369 





285 


557 


561 


692 


Total meeting room usage 


676 





469 


899 


826 


997 


Volunteer hours 


2,134 


1,717 


2,175 


2,095 


2,215 


2,599 


Electronic database usage 


12,462 


13,840 


9,767** 


7,397 


6,609 


6,959 


Howe website-pages accessed 


138,870 


146,361 


208,882 


239,168 


237,802 


226,000 


Public computer use, in-house 


36,660 


34,630 


37,492 


56,183 


58,740 


59,070 



*Library under construction April 2004 through October 2005 - no meeting rooms and limited access 
"Sessions, not searches 



63 



Human Resources Department 



Recruitment and Staffing: The Town of Hanover received and processed 207 
employment applications for 1 3 vacant positions. 

Labor Relations: The Town has three collective bargaining units. Employees of the Public 
Works Department are represented by the American Federation of State, County, and 
Municipal Employees (AFSCME), the Fire Department by the International Association of 
Fire Fighters (IAFF) and the Police Department is represented by the NEPBA Local 27, 
IUPA, AFL-CIO Hanover Police Union. AFSCME is under contract to 6/30/201 1. NEPBA 
and IAFF contracts are to be approved by the voters at Town Meeting and will extend to 
6/30/2010. 

Benefits: All Town employees, union and non-union, participate in precisely the same 
broad-menu flexible benefits package, including health insurance, dental insurance, short 
and long term disability, life insurance, medical and dependent care reimbursement 
accounts and voluntary supplemental insurances. Other benefits such as vacation, sick, and 
personal leave are uniform for all employees throughout the Town. Town employees 
participate in the New Hampshire Retirement System and have the option to also participate 
in several supplemental retirement programs. 

Health and Safety: The Joint Loss Management Committee meets to review Workers' 
Compensation claims and promotes safety, health and wellness programs for Town 
employees. The Committee is committed to initiating and sponsoring safety and wellness 
activities throughout the year. This year all benefits eligible employees were able to 
participate in a screening program for Blood Pressure, Glucose and Cholesterol at no cost. It 
was decided at the December meeting to restructure the Committee in 2010 and develop a 
new agenda with stronger focus on safety. The JLMC members are: 

Employer Representatives & Employee Representatives 

Myra Johnson, Human Resources, Administration 

Bert Hennessy, Captain, Fire Department, 

Frank Austin, Facilities and Fleet Manager, Public Works Department 

Sherry Colfer, Facilities Manager, Parks and Recreation 

John Dumas, Superintendent Water Department 

Robert Henry Sr., Grounds Crew Leader, Public Works Department 

Richard Scheuer, Wastewater Treatment Technician, Public Works Department 

Darlene Cook, Assistant Town Clerk/Receptionist, Administration 

Anne Schofield, Library Assistant II, Howe Library 

David Saturley, Communications Officer, Police Department; 

Training Programs: On-going training programs ensure that our employees maintain 
basic skills with educational updates to help them perform efficiently. Besides programs 
sponsored by the Joint Loss Management Committee, workshops were provided by the 
Local Government Center. A 3 day Leadership Training Workshop was offered to all 
supervisors from the Department of Public Works that was very successful. 



64 



Administrative Assistants Group: This group, with representatives from all departments, 
meets on an ad hoc basis to discuss various issues such as payroll procedures, educational 
opportunities, computer service, and ways to make the processes more efficient with fewer 
problems. This networking serves to forge stronger mutual support for all while solving 
many problems. The Town Administrative Assistants Group representatives are: 

Janice Grady - Howe Library 

Terry Jillson - Water Works Company 

Elizabeth Rathburn - Police Department 

Beth Rivard - Planning and Zoning 

Betsy Smith - Public Works 

Judy Stevens - Fire Department 

Ad Hoc Members: Karen McCusker - Accounting Assistant 

Jeanne Vieten - Community Center Program Assistant 

Charitable Activities: 1 8 employees support the Upper Valley United Way 

At Christmastime, 12 of our employees supported a gift program through LISTEN by 
adopting a senior citizen and a family in need by filling their wish lists. 

Staff: Myra Johnson, Director and Gloria LaCasse, HR Assistant. 



Management Information Systems 

The Management Information Systems (MIS) Department assists departments in selecting, 
implementing, and utilizing software solutions to improve government services. The MIS 
Department oversees the Town's wide area network and a standardized hardware 
replacement schedule, managing standard desktop components over a 4-year useful life. 
The Department is also responsible for negotiating and managing various networked copier 
contracts. 

Staff: Corey Stevens, Director of MIS; Gerry Macy, Information Technology Assistant 
(part-time) 



65 



Parks and Recreation 




2010 Winter Olympic Gold Medalist Hannah Kearney and Hank Tenney, Parks & Recreation Director 

Hannah Kearney played soccer for Hank at Hanover High School from 2000-2003 
accumulating 97 point {52 Goals 45 Assist} to rank 4 l in school history. She was Captain 
of the 2003 team and helped the team win two state titles {2001 & 2002}. She was All State 
4 straight years; one of only 5 players that have accomplished this at Hanover. During her 
four years her teams went 70-6-2. Her 2001 team was ranked 18 th in the USA and her 2002 
team was ranked 24 th in the USA. A true champion and leader. She is one that Hanover 
and Norwich can be very proud of. 

Facilities: The Parks and Recreation Department is located in the Richard W. Black 
Recreation and Senior Center (RWBC), which is located at 48 Lebanon Street. The 
RWBC, which is fully handicapped accessible, is open to the public Monday through 
Friday, 9 am through 6 pm, and Saturdays, 10 am - 6 pm. At other times the building may 
be accessed by reservation which may be made through the Facility Manager by calling 
643-5315. 

The RWBC is a 22,000 square foot, two story building, with a full basement. The first floor 
houses the Facility Manager's office, the Reception desk, the "Teen Lounge", the Director's 
Office and the Multi-Purpose Room & Kitchen. The Multi-Purpose Room offers an 
athletic-style gym with half court basketball and when combined with the Dining Room can 
be used for large functions. The Multi-Purpose Room also has a drop down theater 
projection screen and sound system. The rear portion of the first floor is designated as the 
Senior Center which offers an attractively designed living room/kitchen facility, a health 
screening area and crafts center. The Senior Center Coordinator's office is also in the 
Senior Center. 

The second floor of the RWBC offers five Conference and Activity Rooms which can 
accommodate between 12 and 50. The Assistant Director and the After School Adventures 
Director have offices on the second floor. The Center is well equipped with tables, chairs, 
craft equipment, electronic equipment, presentation materials and a wide variety of 
athletic/recreation gear, including the birthday party favorite: the blow-up Bouncy House. 



66 



Programs: The RWBC offers a variety of age specific programming for tots through 
adults. They include Super Playhouse, Kinder Play, Clay & Kids, French, Start Up Kids 
computer classes, a variety of drawing and hands-on art classes, Line Dancing, drop-in 
volleyball, yoga, Tai Chi, teen & adult dance classes, Babysitter Training, SAT Prep 
classes, watercolor and still life painting. This holiday season the Center sponsored a 
canned food drive which was a great success, the food collected was delivered to the Haven. 
There are several successful camps run by the Recreation Department which include 
Vacation Mini-Camps, 'Tween Camp, Camp Dragonfly, Camp Circle H, and Camp Quest. 

After School Childcare Program: In 2007, due to low enrollment and the departure of the 
Director, the HOST program was put on hold. At the beginning of the 2007-2008 school 
year, representatives from the Town of Hanover, Howe Library, Richmond Middle School 
and the Hanover Recreation Department all met to work on a collaborative afterschool 
program for middle school students. From this committee's work the After School 
Adventures program was created for the 2008 - 2009 school year. This new program is 
open to 4 th , 5 l , and 6 th graders and meets at the Richmond Middle School. Activities 
include weekly field trips and special events, arts & crafts, sports & games, ooey gooey 
activities, science experiments, and student choice. The program meets Monday, Tuesday, 
Thursday, & Friday 3 pm to 5:30 pm and Wednesdays from 2 pm to 5:30 pm. The program 
has averaged 16 kids per day this year with Wednesday's field trips being our largest day. 

Special Activities: The Hanover Parks and Recreation Department once again offered a 
large number of varied special events throughout 2009. These events included: Pre-School 
Halloween Carnival, Halloween Movie Night, Halloween Haunted House, Annual Hanover 
Old Fashioned Fourth of July Celebration, Occom Pond Party, Muster Day, Family Nights, 
Easter Egg Hunt, Pajama Parties, 6 th Grade Barbeque, Mini-Vacation Camps, Dragonfly 
Summer Camp, Circle-H Camp, 'Tween Camp, Camp Quest 16 th Annual 10K Turkey Trot, 
Make & Take Gift Night, 35 th Annual Hanover Basketball Invitational Tournament, and 
five additional themed dances for middle school aged students. 





Participation Statistics: 






Season 


Athletic 


Non-Athletic 




Spring '09 


Youth - 379 


Adult - 200 


Youth- 123 


Adult 


-75 


Summer '09 


Youth - 39 


Adult - n/a 


Youth- 155 


Adult 


-17 


Fall '09 


Youth - 449 


Adult - n/a 


Youth - 57 


Adult 


-67 


Winter '09-' 10 


Youth -211 


Adult - n/a 


Youth - 58 


Adult 


-54 


Season 


Activity 


Rav K-5 


Activity 


RMS 6-8 


Spring '09 


Gr. K-l Farm Baseball 


54 


Gr. 7-8 Boys Baseball 




28 




Gr. 2-3 C Minor Baseball 39 


Gr. 6-8 Girls Softball 




22 




Gr. 3-5 Girls Softball 


23 


Gr. 6-8 Girls Lacrosse 




44 




Gr. 4-5 Lacrosse 


34 


Gr. 6-8 Boys Lacrosse 
Gr. 6-8 Co-Ed Track 




72 
63 


Summer '09 


Soccer Camp - 95 










Fall '09 


K Soccer 


52 










Gr. 1-5 Soccer 


191 


Gr. 7-8 Soccer 




57 




Gr. 4-5 Football 


32 


Gr.7-8 Football 




22 




Gr. 5-6 Field Hockey 


18 


Gr. 7-8 Field Hockey 




35 




Gr. 2-4 Flag Football 


31 


Gr. 6-8 Volleyball 




11 


Winter '09-' 10 


Gr. K-6 Basketball 


133 


Gr. 7-8 Basketball 
TSI Basketball 




78 
10 



67 



Website: The Town of Hanover Recreation Department has a very in-depth website which 
continuously keeps the community in the loop regarding special events and programs 
offered. Directions to games, schedules, brochures, and specifics on various events can be 
found at http://www.hanovernh.org/parksifcrecreation. 

Usage of the RWBC continues to grow. During the period July 1 , 2008 through June 30, 
2009, 3,207 clients reserved space in the Center for a total of 8,193 reserved hours. From 
July 1, 2009 until the end of the year, December 31, 2009, 1,550 groups reserved space in 
the Center. These figures included a variety of users. One of the biggest draws to the 
Center is families renting the Multi-Purpose Room and our Bouncy House for birthday 
parties. Other renters include the Hanover Boy Scouts, Hanover Cub Scouts, Hanover Girl 
Scouts, Ford Sayre Ski Club, Hanover Lion's Club, Institute for Lifelong Education at 
Dartmouth, Hanover Blue Wave Tae Kwon Do, Norwich Bridge Club, Upper Valley Dance 
Club, Youth In Action, Outreach House, Middle Eastern Dance Classes, Pilates, The 
Princeton Review, Christ Redeemer Church and Hanover Church of God, as well as a 
variety of Hanover High School clubs and teams. 

Staff: Henry "Hank" Tenney, Director; Liz Burdette, Assistant Director; Gail Schaal, 
Senior Center Coordinator; Jeanne Vieten, Receptionist; Jessica Eakin, Youth-In-Action; 
Sherry Colfer, Facility Manager; John Wilmot, Building Maintenance, Nicole Leonard, 
After School Adventure's Program Director. 



Planning and Zoning Department 

The Planning and Zoning Department serves the Planning Board, the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment, the Conservation Commission, the Building Code Advisory Committee, and 
the Affordable Housing Commission. It is responsible for planning for the Town's future in 
such areas as land-use, economic development, housing policy, transportation, natural 
resource protection, and maintenance and enhancement of Hanover's special character and 
quality of life as identified in the Town's 2003 Master Plan. It is also responsible for 
zoning administration and enforcement, conservation administration, and building 
inspections and code enforcement. 

Staff: Planning and Zoning Director Jonathan Edwards, Senior Planner Vicki Smith, 
Zoning Administrator Judith Brotman, Building Inspector Ryan Borkowski, Assistant 
Building Inspector Jeffrey Andrews, Administrative Assistant Beth Rivard, Planning and 
Zoning Clerk Debbi Franklin, and Recording Secretary Denise Shibles. 

In addition, since June the Department has benefitted from having an in-house attorney, 
Erika Alders, on legal fellowship from the Boston law firm of Ropes & Gray; she has 
assisted staff and other departments in a wide variety of legal and regulatory topics. 



68 



Police Department 




HPD Photo: Police Officers, Dispatchers, Parking Enforcement Officers, Administration and support 
personnel volunteered their time and participated in an effort to take a department photo last summer. The 
participants were dressed in their respective uniforms where applicable. Photographer Christine Wagoner of 
Lebanon, NH donated her time and talent to the project. It proved to be a successful, team building 
experience. The final product - a large department portrait is on display at police headquarters. 

The men and women of the Hanover Police Department's mission is to "provide 
professional and compassionate police service through partnerships that build trust, reduce 
crime, create a safe environment and enhance the quality of life in our community. To 
fulfill this mission we will have an uncompromising insistence on quality people who 
believe in the following core values: Integrity, Respect, Fairness, and Excellence." The 
Police Department includes the following divisions: Administration, Patrol, Investigation, 
Communications, and Parking. 



Patrol Division : In the 2008 Report we remarked that the police department patrol 
division was finally up to full staff and we are happy to report that we still were through 
2009. Consequently, this enabled us to continue with the dedicated Traffic Enforcement 
officer (TEO) and the assignment of a patrol officer to the detective division. As a 
reminder, the TEO allows an officer to dedicate his or her time strictly on motor vehicle 
violations where different neighborhoods could be selected for directed patrols to address 
such problems as speeding and cut-through truck traffic. The assignment to detectives 
allows an officer to expand their knowledge in criminal investigations and to become more 
adept at interviews and interrogations, the preparation of arrest and search warrants, and the 
collection of forensic evidence. Officer Ufford has had this assignment throughout 2009. 

69 



A couple of important equipment purchases were made in 2009 that were made possible 
through federally sponsored grant programs. The patrol division now has a speed trailer at 
their disposal to be deployed in areas such as school zones to remind motorists to slow 
down. Also, solar powered flashing lights for the elementary school zone on Reservoir 
Road were added. These lights are activated via a computer to the times of the day that 
correspond with the beginning and end of the school day, even taking into consideration the 
early release on Wednesdays. Therefore, any enforcement specific to lower speed limits 
during those hours can be successfully prosecuted in the local district court. 

Complementing our rolling stock, a Honda Ridgeline was purchased to replace the aging 
Ford Expedition. This vehicle provides added utility value for hauling signs and equipment, 
yet still offers seating for four and is used frequently in bad weather. The Ridgeline is 
equipped with most of the same equipment of our other patrol cars yet is a smaller vehicle 
with better fuel mileage than the full-size Sport Utility it replaced. For substantially less, the 
Ridgeline afforded the department a comparable vehicle with seating for four, and a load 
capacity equal to that of the Expedition. 

We have been able to continue our participation in the Central New Hampshire Special 
Operations Unit. Sgt. Brad Sargent is an assistant Team Commander; Officer Paulsen 
remains in the tactical unit; and Dispatcher Goodwin handles communications at an event. 
By participating we are able to bring in a whole range of resources that we wouldn't be able 
to provide on our own should the need arise to cover anything from a hostage situation to 
the search for a missing child. 

HPD Special Projects: 

Water Filtration System: The Hanover Police Department was the first in the Town to 
reduce costs by switching from delivered bottled water to a filtration system that purifies 
water from the tap. 

HPD Evidence Room Overhaul: An extensive project to review and consolidate 
evidence/property held at the Hanover Police Department was completed in the summer of 
2009. 

HPD/CNSOU Dartmouth College Active Shooter Drill: The Hanover Police Department 
and the Central NH Special Operations Team participated in a full day active shooter 
response exercise on the campus of Dartmouth College. College administrators and 
members of the Dartmouth College Department of Safety & Security contributed to the 
success of the drill. 

Detective Division : The Detectives assisted the Patrol Division and solely handled a 
multitude of investigations. Their cases spanned the spectrum of the NH Criminal Code, to 
include theft/shoplifting, burglary, sexual assault, computer fraud/ID Theft, drug offenses, 
liquor law violations, and juvenile offenses. There were several large scale investigations 
which required the attention of this division, to include: 

The case of two men that were observed by an undercover detective conducting illicit drug 
activity in the Hanover Municipal Parking Lot #1 (behind Town Hall). The two were 

70 



arrested at the scene. A subsequent search resulted in the seizure of over $11,000 in 
currency and other evidence connected to illicit drug sales. 

The case of a Dartmouth College student who had engaged an attempt to steal a laptop 
computer and a quantity of money. The investigation resulted in the recovery of all 
property and pending prosecution of the suspect. 

The investigation and prosecution of a high school student who was linked to numerous past 
thefts of bikes, electronics and cash in the Hanover area. 

The investigation of an apparent embezzlement matter at a local business. In an effort to 
identify the perpetrator and preserve evidence, extensive review of business records was 
completed. There was insufficient evidence to sustain a prosecution. 

The investigation of a Dartmouth College student for a reported sexual assault of another 
student. The case required that detectives to travel to NYC to conduct follow-up with the 
suspect. Ultimately, it was determined that the matter did not involve an act prohibited by 
the NH Criminal Code. No charges were filed. 

The investigation and prosecution of a Dartmouth College student for credit card fraud 
involving unauthorized withdrawals from an associate's bank account. 

The investigation and prosecution of a woman in connection with the embezzlement of 
funds from a local business. The follow-up involved an interview with the suspect in 
which a confession was received. 

The investigation and prosecution of two young women in connection to vandalism of a 
residence that was under construction in the Town of Hanover, and property at the Hanover 
High School. 

The investigation and prosecution of a male who participated in a Nigerian check scam 
which resulted in a local bank being defraud over $ 1 7,000. 

The investigation into a suspicious fire at Titcomb Cabin on Gilman Island, (CT River). As 
a result, a number of young persons were connected to the offense and believed responsible 
for the fire. Although no prosecution commenced in 2009, the case remains open pending 
any future new information. 

The investigation of thefts/burglaries at multiple offices throughout the campus of 
Dartmouth College. A transient male from Missouri was ultimately identified as the 
perpetrator. The male was later arrested in California and is pending prosecution in New 
Hampshire. 

The investigation and pending prosecution of a male who passed several bad checks at the 
Coop on two closed accounts. The suspect alleged that he was the victim of an extortion 
matter, occurring in another community. 

The investigation and prosecution of a teenage male who while attending a camp at 
Dartmouth harassed and assaulted a female camp attendee. This case required the 
completion of many interviews with camp representatives and attendees before a 
prosecution decision was made. 

71 



The investigation and pending prosecution of a male driver who hit a female jogger with his 
vehicle in Etna. The suspect driver proceeded to take steps to try and hide what he had done 
and flee the scene. 

The investigation and prosecution of a Dartmouth College student who broke into the 
Dartmouth College Thayer Dining Hall and stole food and damaged computer equipment in 
an office during his entry into the building. Evidence of the crime included a recording 
from the building's surveillance video system. 

The investigation and pending prosecution of a male originally from Connecticut who 
committed a night-time burglary of a local computer business. The suspect broke into the 
business and stole several laptop computers. The investigation included the issuance of 
multiple search warrants and tracking the suspect's movements via cellular phone usage. 
Ultimately, the suspect was arrested as he attempted to sell one of the stolen laptops to an 
undercover detective from the Hanover Police Department in the City of Lebanon. 

The investigation and arrest of two young men from Hanover in connection to the attempted 
burglary of the Ray School. The intent of the burglary was the theft of laptop computer 
equipment. The suspects were also tied to thefts of other laptop computers at locations in 
Hanover. 



Criminal Activity: 
















2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


08-09 
% 
Change 


Patrol Division Statistics 












Murder 





1 











0% 


Sexual Assault 


11 


2 


11 


7 


4 


-43% 


Robbery 











1 


1 


00% 


Burglary 


6 


18 


14 


11 


19 


73% 


Theft 


197 


215 


168 


199 


181 


-9% 


Motor Vehicle Theft 


2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


00% 


Arson 














2 


200% 


UCR Stolen 


$98,565 


$191,611 


$161,482 


$201,448 


$202,638 


1% 


UCR Recovered 


$19,259 


$57,647 


$47,048 


$28,339 


$20,685 


-27% 


Recovery Ratio 


18% 


20% 


30% 


29% 


9.8% 




Assault 


32 


33 


40 


30 


53 


77% 


Forgery 


13 


4 


3 


6 


2 


-67% 


Fraud 


32 


31 


41 


40 


32 


-20% 


Vandalism 


59 


67 


74 


54 


90 


67% 


Possession of Stolen Property 


4 


2 





1 


1 


00% 


Indecent Exposure 


1 





6 


1 





-100% 


Drug Violations 


47 


49 


41 


55 


31 


-44% 


DUI 


27 


25 


37 


17 


40 


135% 


Liquor Violations 


124 


169 


107 


149 


181 


21% 


Intoxication (PC) 


74 


59 


30 


27 


50 


85% 


Disorderly Conduct 


12 


18 


26 


17 


26 


53% 


Harassment 


6 


5 


4 


7 


13 


86% 


Domestics 


22 


8 


9 


5 


6 


-20% 


Facilitate an Underage Drinking 














Party 


5 


4 


2 


3 


2 


-33% 


Open Container-Public 


3 





1 


1 


3 


200% 


Tobacco Violations 


4 


8 


3 


7 


4 


-43% 



72 



6 


5 








33 


3300% 


563 


731 


460 


673 


374 


-44% 


227 


180 


no 


145 


191 


32% 


459 


459 


347 


396 


498 


26% 


258 


211 


262 


244 


250 


2% 


2 














0% 


44 


20 


22 


28 


25 


-11% 


4 


3 


4 


3 


4 


33% 


61 


50 


90 


78 


80 


3% 


2 


3 


2 


5 


1 


-80% 


192 


142 


170 


162 


175 


8% 


4,011 


4,298 


3,292 


4,035 


4,617 


14% 


490 


478 


358 


365 


523 


43% 


264 


238 


184 


169 


224 


33% 


97 


213 


139 


79 


95 


% 


169,969 


170,957 


174,370 


178,896 


185,394 


4% 


14,320 


14,149 


13,434 


14,296 


15,748 


10% 



Land Violations (Zoning) 

MV Unlocks 

Detentions-Adult 

Total Arrests All Categories 

Accidents-Total 

Accidents-Fatalities 

Accidents-Injury 

Accidents-Pedestrian 

Accidents-Hit and Run 

Accidents-Bicycle 

Accidents-Reportable 

Total MV Stops 

MV Citations 

Speeding 

Towed Vehicles 

Patrol Mileage 

Patrol Fuel (gallons) 

Communications Division : The Dispatch Center consists of the division's supervisor and 
seven (7) full time dispatchers. Three part-time employees also supplement the Center. The 
current staffing level was deemed necessary to adequately provide around-the-clock 
coverage to the other ten New Hampshire and seven Vermont towns that contract with the 
Town of Hanover for this service. 

The Dispatch Center continues to seek grant funding opportunities to continue to update its 
aging radio infrastructure. Motorola estimates it will cost almost $2.1 million dollars to 
replace the radio system with a modern system providing adequate coverage to our area. 
At the time of this writing, we have been unsuccessful in three attempts to seek funding. 

The Communications Division's telephone system installation was completed early this 
fiscal year. We have now connected all municipal buildings into one phone system, and 
connected our telephone system to the City of Lebanon's phone system to allow for 
redundancy in our emergency communications center. We continue to work closely with 
the City of Lebanon Dispatch Center and are in the process of connecting their Computer 
Aided Dispatch System to our network for redundancy. 

We have completed the complete installation of all new video surveillance systems within 
the Public Safety complex. This system replaces one whose parts were between 9 and 20 
years old. It is an expandable system. It is our hope to integrate the video system at the 
parking garage and Lot #1 (behind the Town Hall) into this system in the near future. 

We underwent a seamless upgrade to our Motorola Gold Elite Radio Console system. This 
upgrade replaced 8 year old PC Computers that had been running 24 hrs a day, 365 days a 
year. 

In the upcoming fiscal year, the Communications Division will be gearing up for the 
federally mandated Narrow banding of our 1 1 radio channels. This includes replacing our 
Fire Radio Voter system, and several highway radios, and some Fire pagers. We will work 
on a replacement schedule and any possible grant funding for this purpose. This transition 
must be completed by January 1, 2013. 

73 



Dispatch Division Statistics 

Total Incidents 
Hanover Incidents 
All Incoming Calls 
Handled by Dispatcher 
Calls Transferred 
911 Calls 
7 am-3 pm Calls 
3 pm-11 pm Calls 
1 1 pm-7 am Calls 
SPOTS-Dispatch 
SPOTS-Mobile Data 
Police Calls- All Depts. 
Fire Calls-All Departments 
Ambulance Calls-All Depts. 
Fast Squad- All Depts. 
Public Works- All Depts. 
Bank Alarms 
All Other Alarms 













%Change 


2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


08-09 


22,140 


37,232 


40,471 


42,674 


45,518 


6.2% 


13,345 


16,616 


20,365 


22,641 


21,598 


-4.8% 


74,587 


98,224 


87,032 




126,947 


% 


56,631 


77,114 


70,239 




66,864 


% 


17,956 


21,110 


16,792 




60,083 


% 


2,111 


3,487 


3,267 


3,124 


3,005 


-4.0% 


29,916 


36,857 


39,577 




77,104 


% 


21,728 


30,003 


27,896 




41,295 


% 


5,356 


8,906 


8,419 




7,592 


% 


128,248 


307,059 


300,573 


293,582 


331,769 


11.5% 


97,156 


134,073 


153,490 


180,874 


391,710 


63.5% 


20,523 


35,286 


38,004 


40,180 


44,101 


8.9% 


3,778 


3,533 


3,254 


3,114 


3,264 


4.6% 


1,204 


3,262 


3,144 


3,023 


3,217 


6.0% 


579 


915 


727 


772 


694 


-11.2% 


495 


765 


715 


788 


648 


-21.6% 


57 


88 


83 


138 


65 


-112% 


623 


847 


831 


778 


792 


1.8% 



Parking Operations : Staff of the Police Department and Parking Enforcement Division 
writes improper parking notices for violations of the Hanover Parking Ordinance, to include 
expired meters, parking in handicap zones without a permit, parking in prohibited areas and 
for parking on streets and lots after midnight during the winter. 

Parking enforcement offices are located in Town Hall on the second floor, where staff 
accepts payments, answers questions and processes ticket payments through the use of their 
computer based violation tracking system. Parking accepts payments in several forms, to 
include cash, check and credit card. Credit card acceptance was instituted in 2007. Since 
that time, credit card transactions to pay for parking violations have reached 1 5% of total 
revenue in that area. 

Revenue generated through parking related activities flows into a separate Parking Fund 
that is overseen by the Parking & Transportation Board and the Board of Selectmen. Funds 
are used to support on-street and parking facility operations, maintenance of parking areas, 
the Advance Transit shuttle service for commuters and future improvements to the parking 
system. 

There are over 500 parking meters in Hanover, mostly offering two or three hour parking to 
customers and visitors of the Central Business District. Downtown employees can park in a 
large long-term metered lot (Marshall Lot) conveniently located on Maple Street, in one of 
eighty long-term non-metered public permit spaces situated on the periphery of the 
Business District or for free in Thompson Arena. Related permits are available at the 
parking office in Town Hall. 

Parking operations also manages parking in the 289 space facility at 7 Lebanon Street, 
where both short-term and long-term parking is available for customers. The facility is 
open 24/7, with cashiers on duty between 7:00am and 9:00pm every day, but Sunday. A 



74 



validation program is in effect where merchants may purchase 1-hour free stickers at the 
parking office to then distribute to their customers that park in the facility. The covered 
sections of the facility are a good option for overnight parking during the winter parking 
ban. The parking ban is in effect November 15 through April 30 each year, between the 
hours of 12:01am - 7:00am. 

During the year our first major expenditures on new equipment and maintenance for the 
parking garage since year 2000 were made. The equipment replacement included ticket 
dispensers, parking gates and computers. Preventive maintenance included repair of the 
membrane and sealing of walls and capstones to keep water from infiltrating into and 
damaging concrete slabs and brick. 



Parking Division Statistics 

Total Tickets 

Handicap 

Loading - Bus 

Left Wheels to Curb 

Expired Meter 

Winter/Summer Parking Ban 

2-Hour Zone 

Improper Parking 

Meter Feeding 

2&3 Expired Meter Violation 

Prohibited Zone 

Towing Charge 

No Town Permit 

Sidewalk 

Other 

Court Actions 

Tickets Issued by Parking 

Tickets Issued by Police 

Ticket Voids 

Meter Revenue 

Fine Revenue 

Immobilization Warnings 

Vehicles Booted 













2008-09 


2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 


2009 


%Change 


26,416 


28,307 


26,498 


27,053 


25,858 


2.1 


42 


47 


64 


35 


72 


-45.3 


13 


11 


17 


7 


22 


-58.8 


98 


119 


88 


104 


150 


18.2 


22,700 


24,243 


22,665 


23,957 


23,095 


5.7 




1,381 


1,383 


1,651 


882 


-43.2 


43 


50 


38 


7 


2 


-81.6 


100 


100 


153 


151 


156 


-1.3 


180 


241 


219 


261 


94 


19.2 




442 


508 


314 


436 


47.5 


675 


665 


535 


515 


491 


-3.7 


29 


6 


19 


17 


15 


-10.5 


677 


862 


685 


569 


422 

18 

3 


-16.9 

N/A 
N/A 


17 


11 


13 


5 


10 


-61.5 




26,416 


26,479 


24,219 


24,306 


6.4 




1,800 


1,828 


1,946 


1,552 


-33.9 


1,709 


2,441 


2,573 


2,702 


2,793 


5 


408,807 


402,161 


393,962 


367,957 


408,048 


-6.6 


361,940 


388,221 


377,251 


412,934 


363,632 


9.5 




171 


64 


36 


221 


1025 


29 


24 


14 


57 


22 


307.1 



Hanover Juvenile Diversion : Hanover Juvenile Diversion has been administered by the 
Hanover Police Department since 1977. The current committee has 10 volunteer members 
from the communities of Etna, Hanover, Lyme and Norwich. In addition, there are 8 
medical student volunteers (SET mentors). Diversion is the alternative to a court 
proceeding for first time juvenile offenders who qualify and are referred to the diversion 
committee by Hanover police officers or from the Lebanon District Court. The Hanover 
Juvenile Diversion Committee meets twice a month as needed. 

In February 2009, at the recommendation of the Community Substance Abuse Advisory 
Committee, the police department began sending all juvenile cases directly to court and 
letting Judge McLeod make the determination of their disposition. Upon arrest, teenagers 
now go to court where their case can be handled by one of three options: Upper Valley 
Youth Court, Hanover Juvenile Diversion or be heard by the judge. This change was 
implemented to change the "entitlement" attitude that had become prevalent in the 

75 



community. The hope is that this new route of standing before the court will make an 
impact on teenagers to see that an arrest is a serious consequence and that the opportunity of 
diversion or youth court is an appropriate and meaningful resolution of an arrest and not a 
right. The only exception to this new procedure is that juveniles (15 and under) arrested 
for possession of alcohol will continue to go directly through the diversion process. 

In 2009, one case went before the diversion committee. The judge chose to send all of the 
remaining juvenile cases to Upper Valley Youth Court. 

Diversion Statistics for 2009 : 

Diversion In-takes for Alcohol and/or Marijuana Offenses 
Diversion In-takes for Other Offenses 1 
Total Diversion In-takes for 2009 1_ 

Youth Court In-takes for Alcohol and/or Marijuana Offenses 

Youth Court In-takes for Other Offenses 3 

Total Youth Court In-takes for 2009 3 

Failure to Complete Diversion or Upper Valley Youth Court 

In 2008 and 2009, a combined total of 19 teenagers went through the Diversion and Youth 
Court process in Hanover. To date, there have been repeat offenders arrested for a second 
offense giving a recidivism rate of 0% for the past two years. 

Adult Diversion : The Adult Diversion program is for individuals in the 18, 19 and 20 
year-old range who are first time offenders of the State of New Hampshire's underage 
liquor law violations. A person's participation in the program is dependent on the officer's 
recommendation for the individual to attend the program. 

In 2009, 102 people attended Diversion, out of which 2 were not Dartmouth students. 

When a young adult is charged with an alcohol related violation and if they are 
recommended for attendance in the Adult Diversion program versus appearing in court, 
they contact the Diversion Program Coordinator at the Hanover Police Department to fill 
out the required paperwork. They are then scheduled to meet on a Saturday with a group of 
their peers and a Licensed Alcohol Drug Abuse Counselor to discuss issues surrounding 
alcohol use, abuse and other risky behavior. The person will then have a one-on-one follow 
up session with the counselor a few days later to get an individual assessment as to their 
risk level with alcohol and other behaviors that may be concerning. There have been an 
increasing number of students that have attended the program after requiring transport to 
the hospital due to their alcohol abuse. 

The fee for the program is set at $400 per person which covers the cost of the Counselor 
and other materials required for the program. For FY 09-10 we are anticipating that we will 
have close to the same number of attendees as last year. The expenditure of $18,000 (level- 
funded) is to cover the psychologist who runs approximately two sessions per month at $75 
per hour. The first session is 7 hours and the follow-up one-on-one session is approximately 
half an hour per student. 



76 



The benefit for violators to take Diversion versus going to Court is that they will not have a 
record and they will receive enhanced education on the effects of alcohol and other risk 
behaviors in order for them to make safer choices in the future. 

Full Time Staff at Year End: Chief Nicholas J. Giaccone, Jr.; Captain Frank Moran; 
Lieutenant Michael Evans; Lieutenant Patrick O'Neill; Detective Eric Bates; Sergeants: 
Daniel Gillis, Bradford Sargent and David Luther; Patrol Officers: Steven Read, Jeffrey 
Fleury, Shannon Kuehlwein, Alan Patterson, Jeffrey Ballard, Richard Paulsen, Rolf 
Schemmel; Matthew Ufford, Mark Butler, Ryan Kennett, Josh Lee, and Daniel Fowler, III; 
Administrative Assistant Elizabeth Rathburn; Records Coordinator Sheryl Tallman; 
Communications Coordinator E. Douglas Hackett; Dispatchers: Lisa Camarra, Randy 
Wagoner, David Saturley, Tim Goodwin, Fred Cummings, Kevin Lahaye, and Dianne 
Dufresne; Parking Enforcement Technicians: Mark Caruso, Christopher McEwen; Parking 
Secretary Adriane Coutermarsh; and Parking Control/Facility Supervisor Marisela Piatt. 



Public Works Department 

The Public Works Department is comprised of eight (8) operating divisions: 

• Administration 

• Buildings 

• Grounds 

• Highway 

• Fleet Maintenance 

• Sewer Line Maintenance 

• Water Distribution and Treatment 

• Water Reclamation 

The Department continues to provide staff and operate the Hanover Water Works Company 
through a contract. 

Administration Division : The Administration Division provides long range planning, 
engineering, inspections, issuing of permits, and the overseeing of the daily operations. 
During 2009, the Administrative Division continued to oversee all Public Works Divisions 
and the Hanover Water Works Company, providing reviews and site utility inspections for 
Planning & Zoning, as well as overseeing the improvements to the Wastewater Treatment 
Facility. 

• The staff spent considerable time and effort in the lead up to the Special Town Meeting on 
the Municipalization of the Hanover Water Works infrastructure. This included a 
comprehensive review of all infrastructure of the Water Works Company, assessment of 
condition, estimation of future costs of recommended improvements, and a preliminary 
priority plan. 

• Work began in late spring on the upgrading and improvements to Allen Street. 
Improvements were completed by late summer 2009. After a three year delay, funding 
was received from FEMA for the replacement of the retaining wall on Ruddsboro Road (at 
the Falls corner). 



77 



• Improvements in the waste water system continue. Planning also continued for the third 
phase of facility work, which is targeted at the replacement of existing equipment, 
improving reliability, increasing emergency efficiency and reducing the community's 
carbon footprint. 

Administrative Staff: Peter Kulbacki, P.E., Director; Michael Chase, Operations Manager; 
Don Ware, P.E., Utility Engineer; Betsy Smith, Administrative Assistant; Susan Love, Data 
Specialist; Terry Jillson, Water Company dedicated Administrative Assistant. 

Buildings Division : The Buildings Division is responsible for the maintenance, custodial 
services and facilities management for all Town owned buildings. These buildings include: 
the Municipal Building located at 41 South Main Street; the RW Black Recreation and 
Senior Center located at 48 Lebanon Street; the Public Safety Building (which houses both 
the Police and Fire Department) located at 46 and 48 Lyme Road respectively; the Howe 
Library located at 13 South Street; the Etna Library and the Etna Fire House located in 
Etna, the Water Reclamation Facility (formerly known as the Wastewater Treatment 
Facility) located at Pine Knolls Drive; the Summer Park Subsidized Housing Units (3 
buidling units) located at 42 Lebanon Street, the Parking Garage located off from Lebanon 
Street; and the Public Works Facility located on Route 120. 

Significant accomplishments during 2009 included: 

• Completed the installation of the standby generator at the Public Works Facility. 

• Installed programmable thermostats throughout the Public Works Facility to automatically 
set back the heat after hours. Also installed a boiler control system to operate and shut 
down the boiler based on outside temperature. 

• New insulated garage doors were installed at both the Public Works Facility and the Fire 
Department buildings. 

• New flooring was installed in the training room at the Police Department. 

• Installation of timers on the electric hot water heaters at the Public Works Facility and the 
Municipal Building to cut back energy usage after hours. 

• Replaced all outdated smoke detectors at the Municipal Building. 

• Upgraded smoke detectors and alarm system at the Summer Park Elderly Housing units to a 
Point ID System. 

• Changed out the thirty-seven (37) year old boiler at the Fire Station to a high efficient full 
condensation boiler system. 

• Re-stained the exterior on the old section of the Howe Library. 

• Painted the outside window trim at the Municipal Building. 

Buildings Division Staff: Frank Austin, Facilities and Fleet Manager; Steve Driscoll, 
Building Maintenance Technician; Wayne Piekarski, Head Custodian; Neal Augustyn, 
Custodian; Mark Curulla, Custodian. 

Grounds Division : This year thirty-two (32) Valley Forge elms that were planted as 
seedlings in 1998 were planted in various city tree locations throughout the town. These 
neighborhoods included Woodmore, North Park, Dunster, East Wheelock, Valley/Conant 
and on town properties throughout. The seedlings were fifteen inch (15") tall saplings in 
the nursery back then and are now fifteen to eighteen foot (15-18') trees. The Valley Forge 
elm is the most Dutch elm disease resistant elm available. Other species were also planted 
including oaks and urban resistant maples. 

78 



Many mature trees were pruned and the ongoing elm treatment program of large elms is 
continuing. The largest elms are treated every two to three years for the prevention of 
Dutch elm disease. 

The city gardens have been composted and tended by the town gardener, and 4,500 fall 
flower bulbs were planted for spring flowers. 

Recreation field turf maintenance is an annual duty. It was a wet summer so the mowing 
process was a challenge. Over seeding and aeration in the early fall has restored the heavily 
used fields. 

Several new tree species have been added to the cemetery arboretum. A tree labeling 
system is being worked on to provide those interested with identifying characteristics of the 
various cultivars. 

Grounds Division Staff: William E. Desch, Urban Forester, Brian Smith, Arborist, Bob 
Henry Sr., Grounds Crew Leader, and Mike Eigenbrode, Arborist's Assistant. 

Highway Division : The Highway Division is responsible for the infrastructure of the Town 
of Hanover. It is our mission to not only maintain the roads, sidewalks, parking lots and 
drainage systems, but to improve them as well. During the winter season the highway 
personnel accept the challenge of getting everybody to his or her destination safely and 
back again. Summertime is a very busy season making improvements to the infrastructure 
such as, but not limited to, pavement overlays (67 miles), upgrading of our gravel roads (33 
miles), culvert & drainage upgrades, sidewalk reconstruction, special projects as assigned 
and ongoing right-of-way maintenance. 

Accomplishments for 2008-2009 

• The approach from Goose Pond Road leading to Wolfeboro Road was reconstructed and 
paved. This made it safer for traffic and also took care of drainage concerns from storm 
runoff into Goose Pond. 

• Shoulder stone (crushed ledge and fines) was added to parts of King Hill Road along with a 
section of Pinneo Hill Road. Due to the high volumes of traffic on these roads, they are 
prone to potholes and wash boarding. By adding the shoulder stone we were able to make 
the roads safer plus extend our grading intervals on these roads. 

• The Highway Department along with Fleet Services started a pilot program to lower our 
carbon footprint and save fuel. Todd Bragg from Fleet Services was able to program one 
third of our fleet dump trucks to a maximum of five (5) minutes of idle time. This resulted 
in the savings of 466.8 gallons of diesel fuel. During the coming year, Fleet Services will 
take steps to program more of the fleet vehicles. The benefits will be enormous. It will 
lower our carbon footprint, save fuel and extend service intervals. 

• The road surface reclaiming program was in full swing in 2009. A section of Hanover 
Center Road was done in an area that was prone to extreme heaving in the wintertime. The 
reclaiming process consists of grinding the old asphalt surface to a depth of twelve inches 
(12") and adding six inches (6") of new gravel. This will give the road a new sub-base of 
eighteen inches (18"). Chloride is then applied and Town crews start grading/compacting 
the new sub-base. Because our grader is equipped with a computer system that controls the 
slope of the road, many man-hours were saved in engineering layout. A new asphalt surface 



79 



consisting of a two inch (2") base and a one inch (1") wear course is then put down, 
increasing the asphalt life of the road from five (5) years to ten (10) years. 

• Our culvert location and replacement program saw the replacement of approximately four 
hundred feet (400') of failed culvert. 

• The shim/overlay program placed 6,777 tons of asphalt on our development roads and 
neighborhood streets. This should keep these streets and roads in good shape until the next 
cycle in 12 years. 

• Town crews rebuilt the business section of Allen Street. This included new sidewalks, new 
granite curbing, new drainage structures and new paving. Also new LED lighting was 
installed. The LED lighting will see an energy cost savings of 50% or more from the old 
style lighting. 

• Four (4) Main Street light poles and fixtures were replaced this summer, starting our 
streetlight replacement program. 

• Town crews painted all road markings, consisting of 39.5 miles of double yellow line, 75 
miles of fog lines, 3,984 feet of crosswalk, 79 yield symbols, 81 pedestrian symbols, 2,400 
feet of stop bars as well as all parking areas in town. 

• Blacktop aprons were paved at the entrances to Three Mile Road, King Road and Hayfield 
Lane. This will stop the development of potholes at the stop signs that are caused by 
vehicles stopping and starting. This will also make it safer for the town grader. We will no 
longer need to pull or back out of the intersections into oncoming traffic while grading. 

• Shed Two on Greensboro Road was reorganized. Earth mounds were constructed along 
with fencing and an entrance gate. This made room for an access road along with a parking 
area for Farr Field. 

Breakdown of Highway Labor Hours: 



Highway Labor Codes BY 2008-09 



Labor Description 


Reg Time 


Percent of Reg 
Time 


Total OT 


Percent of 
Total OT 


Administration 


514.25 


2.09% 


81.50 


1.98% 


Consulting 


24.50 


0.10% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Education 


597.75 


2.43% 


0.50 


0.01% 


Vacation/Personal 


1513.00 


6.16% 


0.50 


0.01% 


Sick 


582.50 


2.37% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Project Inspection 


93.50 


0.38% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Research 


119.00 


0.48% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Safety Improvements 


1.00 


0.00% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Servicing Dept Equipment 


870.50 


3.55% 


12.50 


0.30% 


Departmental Improvements 


140.00 


0.57% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Not Working 


66.00 


0.27% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Holiday 


1048.00 


4.27% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Workers Comp Time 


1460.00 


5.95% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Bereavement Leave 


8.00 


0.03% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Comp Time 


4.00 


0.02% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Meeting 


109.50 


0.45% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Cutting/Chipping 


669.00 


2.72% 


0.00 


0.00% 



80 



General Cleanup 


607.25 


2.47% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Grading Roads 


1321.00 


5.38% 


21.50 


0.52% 


Guard Rail Work 


15.00 


0.06% 


24.00 


0.58% 


Hauling Gravel 


257.00 


1.05% 


5.00 


0.12% 


Hauling Misc Material 


61.00 


0.25% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Mowing/Trimming 


231.75 


0.94% 


4.75 


0.12% 


Paved Road Repair 


207.50 


0.85% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Gravel Road Repair 


62.00 


0.25% 


1.00 


0.02% 


ROW Shoulder Work 


354.50 


1.44% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Install Repair Replace Signs 


520.50 


2.12",, 


0.00 


0.00% 


Storm Cleanup 


417.50 


1.70% 


15.25 


0.37% 


Traffic Control 


38.00 


0.15% 


5.00 


0.12% 


Prep for Paving 


0.00 


0.00% 


3.00 


0.07% 


Sidewalk Work 


283.50 


1.15% 


35.00 


0.85% 


Sweeping Street/Sidewalks 


344.00 


1.40% 


45.00 


1.09% 


Emergency Call 


3.00 


0.01% 


84.00 


2.04% 


Miscellaneous 


62.50 


0.25% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Pavement Markings 


466.50 


1.90% 


64.00 


1.55% 


Parking Lots (Summer Maint.) 


14.00 


0.06% 


35.00 


0.85% 


Sweep Parking Garage 


1.00 


0.00% 


20.00 


0.49% 


Pressure Washing Sidewalks 


52.50 


0.21% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Leaf Blowing 


79.50 


0.32% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Roadside Garbage 


2.00 


0.01% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Long Line Painting 


159.00 


0.65% 


68.00 


1.65% 


Pushing Snow Back 


242.00 


0.99% 


8.00 


0.19% 


Cutting Ice 


48.00 


0.20% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Hauling Winter Sand 


669.25 


2.73% 


4.00 


0.10% 


Hauling Gravel/Mud Season 


262.00 


1.07% 


2.00 


0.05% 


Plowing Operations 


555.25 


2.26% 


996.00 


24.18% 


Sanding/Salting 


892.75 


3.64% 


740.75 


17.98% 


Snow Removal Operations 


734.50 


2.99% 


878.25 


21.32% 


Parking Lots (Winter Maint.) 


176.50 


0.72% 


264.25 


6.42% 


Sidewalk Winter Operations 


244.50 


1.00% 


177.25 


4.30% 


Culvert Installation 


248.50 


1.01% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Check/Clean Drainage 


497.00 


2.02% 


19.50 


0.47% 


Clean Catch Basins 


97.00 


0.40% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Storm Damage 


477.50 


1.94% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Thawing Culverts 


4.00 


0.02% 


3.00 


0.07% 


Ditching 


620.50 


2.53% 


1.00 


0.02% 


Catch Basin Rehab 


278.50 


1.13% 


4.00 


0.10% 


Howe Library Misc. 


2.00 


0.01% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Street Festival 


2.00 


0.01% 


15.00 


0.36% 


Shrine Game/Parade 


8.00 


0.03% 


15.00 


0.36% 



81 



Green Up Day 


25.00 


0.10% 


10.00 


0.24% 


Chamber of Commerce/Misc. 


4.00 


0.02% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Asphalt Recycling 


260.50 


1.06% 


27.00 


0.66% 


Municipal Office Remodel 


4.00 


0.02% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Wyeth Hunter Reclaim 


4.00 


0.02% 


4.00 


0.10% 


Lyme Rd. Streetscape 


176.00 


0.72% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Traffic Calming 


7.00 


0.03% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Conservation Commission Misc. 


10.00 


0.04% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Street Light Maintenance 


31.50 


0.13% 


0.50 


0.01% 


Boat Landing 


12.00 


0.05% 


0.00 


0.00% 


South Roundabout 


2.00 


0.01% 


32.00 


0.78% 


Special Events 


9.00 


0.04% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Lebanon St./S. Main Traffic Lights 


2.00 


0.01% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Reservoir Road Rebuild 


2268.50 


9.24% 


43.25 


1.05% 


Main and Wheelock Traffic Lights 


31.00 


0.13% 


8.50 


0.21% 


Allen St. Rebuild 


107.70 


0.44% 


264.00 


6.41% 


Grounds 


8.00 


0.03% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Fleet 


874.00 


3.56% 


10.00 


0.24% 


Fire Department 


10.00 


0.04% 


0.00 


0.00% 


School 


14.00 


0.06% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Parking Enforcement 


111.50 


0.45% 


34.00 


0.83% 


Police Department 


3.00 


0.01% 


17.00 


0.41% 


Recreation 


13.50 


0.05% 


0.00 


0.00% 


Sewer Line Maintenance 


310.50 


1.26% 


10.50 


0.25% 


Water Company 


9.00 


0.04% 


2.50 


0.06% 


Buildings Department 


804.00 


3.27% 


2.50 


0.06% 




24552.45 




4119.25 





Highway Division Staff: Randy MacDonald, Operations Supervisor; John Lahaye, Steve 
Perry, Chris Berry, Roger Darisse, James Messier, Robert Henry, Jr., Moses Delphia, Jack 
Lusona, Bruce Sanborn, James Cadwell, David Field, Larry Brown — Equipment 
Operators/Highway Maintenance Workers 



Fleet Service Division : The Fleet Service Division is responsible for maintenance of all 
Town vehicles, standby generators, and operational equipment and fuel systems. The 
Division provides regularly scheduled preventative maintenance on over 100 pieces of 
registered equipment and an additional 60 pieces of small equipment. In addition, our 
mechanics help out the Highway Division with snow removal and plowing when necessary. 
Significant accomplishments during this last year include: 

• With the input from the Public Works Departments, the Line Maintenance Division and the 
Fire Department we prepared specifications for, and took delivery of, the following 
equipment: 

Stainless V-Box Sander 

Chipper 

82 



Bull -Dozer 
Sewer Line Flusher 
Ambulance and Rescue Truck 

Fleet Service Division Staff: Frank Austin, Facilities & Fleet Manager; Donald Foster, Jr., 
Shop Foreman; Todd Bragg, Senior Mechanic; Mark Bean, Stock Room Clerk/Mechanic's 
Assistant. 

Sanitary Line Maintenance & Construction Division : The Line Maintenance crew is 
responsible for the safe and uninterrupted flow of wastewater from the source to the 
treatment facility. The crew maintained and improved forty-four (44) miles of the gravity 
sewer lines and over twelve-hundred (1,200) sewer manhole structures. 

The Line Maintenance crew is also responsible for providing inspection of all new and 
replacement lines connecting to the existing sewer line system. This not only protects the 
Town of Hanover, but also ensures that the customer receives a high quality service. 

The Line Maintenance crew is responsible for the preventive maintenance of over forty- 
four (44) miles of collection system using a high-pressure flushing unit. Approximately 

sixty-five hundred (6,500) feet of sewer line are flushed on a monthly basis. 

The Line Maintenance crew continued with their annual root-cutting program this year, 

servicing more than three-thousand (3,000) feet of line in the past year with their Root 

Cutting Equipment. 

The Sewer Line Division replaced its eleven (11) year old Sreco sewer flusher with a 

higher pressure flusher made by US JETTING. 
The Sewer Line Division has started using some of the new trenchless technology referred 

to as "Slip Lining." Slip lining involves lining an old clay tile pipe with new PVC pipe, 

without digging up the road. 

This year, two-hundred and fifty feet (250') of old eight-inch (8") clay tile sewer line was 

slip lined with new pipe on Currier Street. Also slip lined was two-hundred forty-five feet 

(245') of six-inch (6") clay tile pipe on Sargent Street. 

Over four-hundred feet (400') of eight-inch (8") clay tile pipe was slip lined on Hovey 

Lane. 

Several sewer manholes and three-hundred feet (300') of sewer line have been replaced in 

and around Dartmouth College's new Visual Arts Center. 

With this year's paving program, twenty-five (25) sewer manholes frames and covers were 

upgraded for overlays and several others needed repairs. 

The crew provided the mowing and maintenance of approximately five to six (5-6) miles 

of sewer line rights-of-way, which also doubles as nature walk paths. The crew also mows 

two pocket parks. 

The crew is working on re-conditioning the sidewalk benches on Main Street. Two to three 

benches are done each year. 

The crew is also responsible for the winter maintenance of all sidewalks. This is done with 

the Town's three sidewalk tractors. The sidewalk tractor used for Main Street was replaced 

this year, providing better service in the Downtown area. 

Chris Berry and Steve Perry, from the Highway Division, received on the job training and 

are now qualified to be on the emergency call list for sewer line related issues. 
Sanitary Collection System Staff: Lenny Bolduc, Sewer Line Maintenance Crew 
Supervisor; Raymond Swift, Line Maintenance Worker. In addition, during peak 
construction time and winter operations of sidewalks, the crew is assisted by other 
cross-trained DPW workers. 

83 



Breakdown of Line Maintenance Labor Hours: 



Labor Description 



Reg Time 



Percent of Reg 
Time 



Over Time 



Percent of 
OT 



Administration 



79.00 



2.19% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Consulting 



10.00 



0.28% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Education 



8.50 



0.24% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Vacation/Personal 



445.50 



12.37% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Sick 



48.00 



1.33% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Research 



52.00 



1.44% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Safety Improvements 



83.00 



2.30% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Servicing Dept Equipment 



50.25 



1.39% 



2.00 



0.52% 



Departmental Improvements 



122.00 



3.39% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Not Working 



2.00 



0.06% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Holiday 



153.00 



4.25% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Sidewalk Work 



16.00 



0.44% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Sweeping Street/Sidewalks 



61.00 



7.69% 



.00 



2.08% 



Sanding/Salting 



0.00 



0.00% 



8.25 



2.15% 



Snow Removal Operations 



55.25 



1.53% 



120.75 



31.47% 



Parking Lots (Winter Maint.) 



4.00 



0.77% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Sidewalk Winter Operations 



401.00 



11.13% 



220.75 



57.52% 



Manhole Locating 



27.00 



0.75% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Manhole Raising 



446.00 



12.38% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Manhole Installation 



12.00 



0.33% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Mapping Sewer Line 



18.00 



0.50% 



0.00 



0.00% 



ROW Maintenance 



111.00 



3.08% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Sewer Line Flushing 



530.25 



14. 72% 



6.00 



7.56% 



Sewer Line Inspection 



72.00 



2.00% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Sewer Line Locating 



116.00 



3.22% 



3.00 



0.78% 



Sewer Line Maintenance 



28.00 



0.78% 



0.00 



0.00% 



SL Rehab 



12.00 



0.33% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Sewer Line Rodding 



11.00 



0.57% 



0.00 



0.00% 



General Cleanup 



1.00 



0.03% 



0.00% 



Sewer Line Call 



27.00 



0.75% 



6.00 



7.56% 



Sewer Line Repair 



104.00 



2.89% 



5.00 



7.50% 



Root Cutting 



113.00 



3.14% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Bacterial Application 



3.00 



0.08% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Bacteria Program 



.00 



0.22% 



0.00 



0.00% 



TV Lines 



70.50 



7.96% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Meter Reading LMC 



44.00 



7.22% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Barrel and Bench Refurbishment 



88.00 



2.44% 



4.00 



1.04% 



Grounds 



5.00 



0.74% 



0.00 



0.00% 



84 



Fleet 

Police Department 



56.00 
19.00 



1.55% 
0.53% 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00% 
0.00% 



Recreation 



4.00 



0.11%, 



00 



0.00%, 



WWTF 



2.00 



0.06% 



0.00 



0.00% 



Highway 



53.00 



1.47% 



0.00 



0.00%, 



Meter Reading 



31.00 



0.86% 



0.00 



0.00%, 



Water Reclamation Facility 




Water Reclamation Facility Employees: 
Front Row: Dennis Smith, Brandon Corey, Wastewater Superintendent Kevin MacLean, and Mark Roper, 

Back Row: Seth Bean and Richard Scheuer 



Water Reclamation Facility : This past year was relatively quiet in regards to construction 
projects, however much time and effort has been directed to upcoming projects which 
consist of Aeration system replacement and Pump Station #5 {Girl Brook} improvements. 
These two projects met the criteria to be included in the American Reinvestment and 
Recovery Act {ARRA}. This allowed 50% of each project cost to be offset with Federal 
Government funds, significantly reducing costs. 

The larger "Facility Upgrade" project is approximately at the 40% design phase, with the 
project anticipated to go out for bid in mid fall of 2010. This project will entail anaerobic 
digester rehabilitation, influent screen installation, solids handling equipment replacement, 
pump replacement, partial electrical service upgrades, Supervisory Control and Data 
Acquisition {SCADA} improvements and partial HVAC improvements. 

General statistics for 2009 include: 

• Treatment of approximately 517 million gallons of raw wastewater to secondary treatment 
levels. This is a decrease of approximately 35 million gallons or 6% from 2008 levels. The 
decrease is attributed to water conservation measures within the system and economical 
uncertainties hindering construction projects. 

• In perspective: The Water Reclamation Facility was sent 316,099 pounds of Total Settleable 
Solids {TSS} and 319,959 pounds of Biochemical Oxygen Demand {BOD}-?/zese are 
measureable parameters established in our permit. Of these loading measurements, we 



85 



removed 97% of the TSS and 98% of the BOD from the wastewater last year. Our permit 
mandates that we achieve a minimum of 85%. These loadings reveal {18,000 pounds}, 6% 
and {12,000 pounds}, 3.8% reduction in those areas respectively in 2009 

• Production of approximately 1,646 wet tons {2,507 y 3 } of bio-solids, all of which were 
composted in Unity, Maine for beneficial reuse. This represents an increase of approximately 
12% {200 wet tons} from 2008. The rise is attributed to increased dewatering for process 
control and reflects the concentration of TSS and BOD coupled with the reduction of flow. 

• Continued Sludge Quality Certification renewal with NHDES. 

• This past year resulted in over 30 tours conducted for private, academic, and public groups. 

• The Industrial Pretreatment Program {IPP} is in place and has issued permits in the following 
categories: Class 1 users - 4 of 5 sites have been permitted, Class 2 users - 10 of 10 sites 
have been permitted and Class 3 users - 16 of 18 sites have been permitted. This shows a 
permitted status of 91% for identified user categories. IPP Coordinator - Mark Roper has 
been diligently pursuing this task as well as conducting sampling events to determine the 
characteristics of the wastewater that enters this facility to be treated. 

• Treatment of approximately 144,850 gallons of septage from private septic systems. A 
decrease of approximately {30%} 61,000 gallons from 2008. The reduction in this area can 
be directly associated with the uncertainty of the economy and further demonstrating that 
onsite septic maintenance is easily deferred during "normal" times and even more so when 
money gets tight. It should be noted that this is not the most environmentally prudent course 
of action. 

• Most notably, 2009 culminated with the notification of two prestigious awards being given to 
Hanover. The first was the United States Environmental Protection Agency's {EPA} 
Operation and Maintenance excellence award. The second being the issuance of the New 
Hampshire chapter of the New England Water Environment Association's {NEWEA}' 
Operator of the Year award going to Kevin MacLean. 

It is with great pride and honor that all staff working at the Water Reclamation Facility 
acknowledges being recognized by fellow peers, State and Federal agencies as well as the 
respected organizations which assist and provide guidance to the operation of wastewater 
utilities in New England. 

Treatment Division Staff: Kevin MacLean - Superintendent; Mark Roper -IPP 
Coordinator; Dennis Smith - Maintenance Technician, Seth Bean and Richard Scheuer, 
Treatment Technicians, Brandon Corey - Treatment Technician Assistant. 

Thanks to all for their dedication, support and hard work. 



Sincerely, 

Kevin MacLean - Superintendent 



86 



Supervisors of the Checklist 

Duties of the Supervisors: The Supervisors of the Checklist are elected and given the 
responsibility of registering the voters of Hanover and maintaining the checklist that is used 
at all elections. They serve in that capacity for the Town of Hanover, the Hanover School 
District, and the Hanover voters in the Dresden School District. 

Elections: In 2009 there were three elections during which the Supervisors were present as 
directed by New Hampshire law. The number of registered voters on the checklist on May 
12 for the Hanover Town Meeting was 10,220 with 551 voting. 

Registered Voters: The number of registered voters was similar for the Dresden/Hanover 
school budget in March and for the Special Town Meeting that was held in October. 



Town Clerk and Tax Collector 

In the fall of 2008 the Town of Hanover began motor vehicle registration through M.A.A.P. 
(the State's Municipal Agent Automation Project). Vehicle registrations are entered directly 
into the state's DMV system and are processed instantaneously. The implementation of this 
service has been very successful; in several cases, customers no longer need to go to a State 
substation to complete most of their transaction. In addition, we are now able to process and 
provide vanity plates, conservation plates, and survivorship transfers. In the near future, the 
weight limit (which governs which vehicles can be registered through the Town Clerk's 
Office vs. those which must be registered at a State substation) will be increased. Our 
customers will welcome our office's ability to complete more of their transactions, as the 
closest State substation is now located in Claremont. 

This office is also tasked with providing customers with vital record certificates. The Town 
is a part of the New Hampshire Vital Records Information Network (NHVRTN), a statewide 
database developed and maintained by the Secretary of State's Division of Vital Records 
Administration. This system allows us to produce copies of birth, marriage, divorce, and 
death certificates for activities occurring in any New Hampshire municipality. The 
following records are available through our office: 

• Birth Records: 1987 -present 

• Death Records: 1990 -present 

• Marriage Records: 1989 - present 

• Divorce Records: 1990 to within 6 months from the present date 

• In addition to the State -wide data base, we have records that go back to the 1800's 
for events that occurred in Hanover. 

New Hampshire vital records are considered to be private, and access to them is restricted 
by statute to those individuals who have a "direct and tangible interest" in the record. 
Certain older records are exempt from these access restrictions. Birth records older than 



87 



100 years, and deaths, marriages and divorce records older than 50 years are available to the 
general public. 

Managing and maintaining the Town's data is a major responsibility of the Town Clerks' 
Office. In addition to existing databases to facilitate motor vehicle registrations, dog 
licensing, landfill tickets, and vital records, in 2009 a database to manage information 
pertaining to all the Town's cemeteries was implemented. Donna Stender, Assistant Town 
Clerk/Deputy Tax Collector, spearheaded the process of uploading all the existing data and 
entering countless records from the old handwritten books. This database is an extremely 
useful tool for the office staff to access as they answer questions regarding burial records. 




Right Photo: Marilyn "Willy" Black, Town Moderator; Center Photo: Town Clerk Charlie Garipay, Deputy 
Town Clerk/Director of Administrative Services Betsy McClain, Tax Collector/Director of Town Clerk Office 
Liz Meade, Asst. Tax Collector Donna Stender; Right Photo: Selectman Bill Baschnagel. 



The only election held in the 2009 fiscal year was Town Meeting Day, on May 12 th 2009. 
We continue to update our voter records on a regular basis through the tireless efforts of our 
elected Supervisors of the Checklist. 

Our office is open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. We're here to help with 
a wide variety of services, including processing motor vehicle registrations, issuing certified 
copies of vital records, dog licenses, vendor permits and collecting property/yield/land use 
change taxes and sewer payments, to name a few. Our staff is dedicated to provide helpful, 
efficient and friendly customer service — our citizens deserve nothing less! 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Elizabeth A. Meade 

Director of Town Clerk's Office and Tax Collector 



88 



Town of Hanover 

Tax Collector's Report 

Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2009 

2009 Tax Year 2008 Tax Year 
Uncollected Taxes, July 1, 2008 

Property Taxes $ 

Yield Taxes 

Sewer Charges 

Utility Credit Bal 

Property Tax Credit Bal 
Taxes Committed, Fiscal Year 2009 

Property Taxes 

Land Use Change Taxes 

Yield Taxes 

Sewer Charges 
Overpayments 

Interest on Delinquent Taxes - 32,244 
Interest on Delinquent Sewer 227 1,358 



$ 


11,698,210 


- 


877 


- 


40,903 


(2,246) 


- 


- 


(9,209) 


16,108,787 


15,881,074 


13,300 


- 


7,296 


2,107 


1,977,769 


- 


2,210 


48,847 



TOTALS 


$ 18,107,343 $ 


27,696,412 


Collections During Fiscal Year 2009 






Property Taxes 


$ 10,405,386 $ 


27,506,867 


Land Use Change Taxes 


13,300 


- 


Yield Taxes 


7,296 


2,930 


Sewer Charges 


1,921,683 


39,050 


Liens Executed (Principal Only) 


- 


106,107 


Property Tax Abatements 


498 


7,801 


Other Tax Abatements 


51 


54 


Sewer Charge Abatements 


562 


- 


Interest 


228 


33,602 


Uncollected Taxes, June 30, 2009 






Property Taxes 


5,748,952 


- 


Yield Taxes 


- 


- 


Sewer Charges 


37,778 


- 


Utility Credit Bal 


(102) 


- 


Property Tax Credit Bal 


(28,289) 


- 



TOTALS $ 18,107,343 $ 27,696,412 



89 



Town of Hanover 

Tax Collector's Report 
Summary of Tax Lien Accounts 
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2009 

2008 Tax Year 2007 Tax Year Prior Years 



Unredeemed Liens July 1 , 2008 

Liens Executed in Fiscal Year 2009 (includes 
interest and fees) 



113,663 



58,662 $ 



17,111 



Abatements of Unredeemed Liens 



(434) 



(4,562) 



Property Deeded to Town During FY2009 



(1,106) 



(1,358) 



(1,277) 



Collections During Fiscal Year 2009 



(41,632) 



(44,259) 



(11,273) 



Unredeemed Liens June 30, 2009 



70,925 $ 



12,611 $ 



2009 - Ten Largest Taxpayers 



Trustees of Dartmouth College 

Kendal at Hanover 

South Street Downtown Holdings, Inc. 

Hanover Water Works Company 

Hypertherm Inc. 

Bayne Stevenson 

Seven Lebanon Street Inc 

Dorothy M. Byrne 

The Sheridan Group, Inc. 

Granite State Electric Company 



$5,260,941 
1,019,111 
342,524 
260,907 
211,812 
205,978 
191,226 
187,060 
166,735 
148,331 



90 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 

for Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2009 



ISSUE OF DOG LICENSES: 

851 Dog Licenses $ 3,468 

Payments due State on Dog Licenses 452 

Payments due State on Pet Overpopulation Fund 1,574 

PAYMENTS TO TREASURER $ 5,494 

AUTO REGISTRATIONS: 

7,568 Auto Permits Issued $ 1,1 50,946 

Title Fees 2,454 

Municipal Agent Fees 18,906 

Municipal Transportation Improvement Fund 34,661 

Mail-In Fees 2,915 



PAYMENTS TO TREASURER $ 1,209,882 



ALL OTHER FEES: 






Vendor Permits 


$ 


1,275 


Town Clerk Fees 




7,792 


Dog Fines 




750 


Landfill Tickets 




23,415 


Extra Recycling Bins 




1,166 


Miscellaneous Fees 




4,502 


Notary Fees 




605 


Payments to State on Certified Copies & Marriage Licenses 




15,236 


PAYMENTS TO TREASURER 


$ 


54,741 


TOTAL RECEIPTS REMITTED TO TREASURER 


$ 


1,270,117 



91 



Vehicle Registration Information 

Vehicle owners must begin the registration of their vehicles at the Town Clerk's office. To re- 
register, owners may use the mail-in procedure or come into the Municipal Office. Renewals, 
decals, transfers and plates are available. You save $1 .00 mail-in fee per vehicle by coming into 
Town Hall rather than mailing in your renewal, $3.00 more if you choose to complete the final 
state portion of your registration at the sub-station in Claremont. 

You can now renew your vehicles online by going to www.HanoverNH.org and click on the E- 
REG icon, have your bank routing and account number, and follow the instructions. 
There is a $1 .50 per vehicle fee and a one-time transaction fee of 35 cents. 



Dog License Information 

You must provide proof of current rabies and proof of neutering or spaying. License your dog(s) 
by May 3 1 to avoid $ 1 .00 per month late charges. 

License Fees: Male or Female $ 9.00 

Altered Male or Female; Puppies 6.50 

Senior Citizen Owner 2.00 (for 1 st dog only) 

If you are a dog owner, you will receive a reminder in the mail that your dog(s) need(s) to be 
licensed. 



Dredge and Fill Applications 

Those operating in or near wetlands or waterways shall file a Dredge and Fill application at the 
Town Clerk's office before beginning work (RSA 483-A). Fines may be assessed for non- 
compliance. 



Other Services 

Vendor permits are available at the Town Clerk's office. We provide notary services at no 
charge for Hanover residents; there is a $5.00 fee per signature for nonresidents. Certified copies 
of vital records are available for a $12.00 fee for the first copy, with an $8.00 fee for additional 
copies requested at the same time (must request in person or in writing with adequate 
information and authorization). Trail maps and Hanover town maps are available as well. 
Landfill tickets are also purchased through our office; they are sold in a punch card of 10 
punches for 15.00. Each punch is equal to approximately 25 lbs. Recycling bins are available at 
$7.00 each. 



92 



Voter Registration 

Every resident of Hanover who has a fixed and permanent domicile in the town, who is a citizen 
of the United States, and who is 1 8 years of age may register to vote in the town. A resident is 
someone who has a domicile in the town on a continuing basis for a significant portion of each 
year. A person can have only one domicile for the purpose of voting. 

Voter Registration Form: Information that must be provided includes name, address (mailing 
and legal residence), place and date of birth and proof of citizenship. Filling out the voter 
registration form and signing it involves a solemn oath that the information is true. 

Party Affiliation: No one is required to list a party affiliation, but in New Hampshire one may 
register as a Democrat or Republican. Listing oneself as undeclared means that one has no party 
preference; there is no "independent" party. In primary elections an undeclared voter may 
request any party's ballot at the polls and will be listed on the checklist in the future as affiliated 
with that party. A voter who wishes to return to undeclared status after voting may do so at the 
place of polling by filling out a card and giving it to a Supervisor of the Checklist, however, 
change of party affiliation from one party to another may be done no sooner than the day after 
election. 

Rights and Responsibilities: If the qualifications to vote are met, the Supervisors of the 
Checklist will add the applicant to the voter checklist. As a registered voter of Hanover, New 
Hampshire, one has the right to vote at any meeting or election held within the town. One also 
shares in all the responsibilities of being a citizen of the Town and State. 

Where to Register: Individuals may register to vote at the Town Office on Main Street with 
office hours Monday - Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Applications may be made at any time 
of the year (except 1 days prior to any election). There are also special registration sessions 
conducted by the Supervisors of the Checklist on Saturday mornings and evening hours on 
certain dates just prior to an election. These dates are published in the Valley News and posted 
on the bulletin board at the door of the Town Office. You may also register at the Polls on 
Election Days with proper proof of ID and proof of residence. Notes... 



93 



Notes... 



94 



Chapter 4 



Board 

and 

Committee 

Reports 



95 



Town of Hanover 
Boards and Committees 

Advanced Transit Board - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

William R. Baschnagel, 65 Trescott Road, Etna H-643-2972 

Judith Rocchio, 38 College Hill, Hanover H-643-6902 

Advisory Board of Assessors - 3 year Term - Nominated at Town Meeting by Majority Vote 

Richard W. Birnie, PO Box 14, Etna W-646-2666 5/2012 

Joe Roberto, PO Box 155, Etna H-643-2634 5/201 1 

Paul F. Young, 2 Barrett Road, Hanover H-643-4488 5/2010 

Katherine S. Connolly, 2 Pleasant Street, Hanover H-643-3822 Selectboard Rep. 

Brian F. Walsh, 52 Berrill Farms Lane, Hanover H-643-8296 Selectboard Rep. Alt. 

Affordable Housing Commission -3 year term - Appointed by the Board of Selectmen 

Bruce Altobelli, 123 Trescott Road, Etna H-643-5006 9/2012 

Len Cadwallader, 23 Rip Road, Hanover H-643-1343 9/2010 

Donald Derrick, 4 Carter Street, Hanover H-643-3256 9/2012 

Paul Olsen, Dartmouth College W-646-2446 9/2011 

James Reynolds, 12 Storrs Road, Hanover H-643-1238 9/2010 

chr. Robert Strauss, 7 Read Road, Hanover H-643-9085 9/2010 

Andrew Winter, 1 1 Buell St., Hanover H-643-29 1 1 9/20 1 1 

Joan Collison, 7 Pleasant St., Hanover H-643-5748 9/2012 Alt. 

Vacancy H-643- — 9/2007 

Vacancy H-643- — 9/2008 

Vacancy W-643 9/2009 

Judith A. Doherty, 97 Greensboro Road, Hanover H-643-4071 Selectboard Liaison 

Bike/Pedestrian Committee - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

Tim Cox, 106 South Main Street, Hanover 643-0012 tpac(a),dartmouth. edu 
Doug Deaett, 1 Bridgman Road, Hanover 643-6524 DougDeaett(g),gmail.com 
Scot Drysdale, 8 Mink Drive, Hanover 643-3989 Scot(q)cs.dartmouth.edu 
Tom Linell, 46 Rip Road, Hanover 643-3397 TomLinell(£>yahoo.com 
Roger Lohr, 1 1 Mulherrin Farm Road, Hanover 643-0920 Lohr2 1 (o> verizon.net 
Matthew Marshall, P.O. Box 4, Etna 

chr Hugh Mellert, 1 1 Old Lyme Road, Hanover 643-7778 
Bob Norman, 12 Berrill Farms Lane, Hanover 

Charlie Sullivan, Ex Officio, 13 Gilson Road, West Lebanon 643-3477 Chrs(a>dartmouth. edu 
Carol Perera Weingeist, 38 Valley Road Ext., Hanover 643-6850 cpereraw(a>verizon.net 
Joanna Whitcomb, 1 6 Reservoir Road, Hanover 

Bill Young, 22 Rope Ferry Road, Hanover 643-2224 William. Young(a),dartmouth.edu 
Athos J. Rassias, 14 Carriage Lane, Hanover H-643 -4602 Selectboard Liaison 

Board of Selectmen - 3 year Term - Ballot Vote 

Peter L. Christie, PO Box 2, Etna H-448-1737 5/201 1 

sec. Judith A. Doherty, 97 Greensboro Road, Hanover H-643-4071 5/2012 

vchr.Katherine S. Connolly, 2 Pleasant Street, Hanover H-643-3822 5/2012 

Athos J. Rassias, 14 Carriage Lane, Hanover H-643-4602 5/2010 

chr Brian F. Walsh, 52 Berrill Farms Lane, Hanover H-643-8296 5/2011 

Building Code Advisory Board - 3 year Term - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

Randy T. Mudge, 1 3 Dartmouth College Hwy. , Lyme W-795-483 1 9/20 1 

Bruce R. Williamson, Box 193, Etna H-643-4648 9/2010 

Jack Wilson, 2 Chase Road, Hanover H-643-4046 9/2010 



96 



Chamber of Commerce 

Brian F. Walsh, 52 Berrill Farms Lane, Hanover H-643-8296 

Conservation Commission - 3 year term - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

H-643-6430 

H-643-4150 

H-643-5844 

H-643-0172 

H-643-3996 

W-646-3462 

H-643-8990 

H-643— - 

H-643— - 

H-643-4602 

H-643-3421 



Chr. 



Robin Carpenter, 28 Thompson Road, Hanover 

Ed Chamberlain, 20 Wolfeboro Road, Etna 

Douglas Mcllroy, 1 Hay field Road, Etna 

Anne Morris, PO Box 296, Etna 

Judith Reeve, 14 N. Balch Street, Hanover 

Sandra White, 44 Greensboro Road, Hanover 

Ray Hogue, 1 Wardrobe Road, Hanover 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 

Athos J. Rassias, 14 Carriage Lane, Hanover 

Michael Mayor, 147 Three Mile Road, Etna 
Etna Library Board of Trustees - 3 year term - Ballot Vote 

Chris Bentivoglio, 4 Lakeview Drive, Hanover 

Jean Keene, 1 Woods End Rd., Etna 

Rhonda N. S. Siegel, 113 Blueberry Hill, Hanover 
Friendship/Sister Cities Advisory Committee 

Katherine S. Connolly, 2 Pleasant Street, Hanover 



H-448-9558 
H-643-2899 
H-448-6988 



Sclcctboard Rep. 

9/2009 

9/2010 

9/2012 

9/201 1 

9/2011 

9/2010 

9/2011 Alt. 

9/2006 Alt. 

9/2008 Alt. 

Selectboard Rep. 

9/2011 Plan. Bd. Rep. 

5/2010 
5/2011 
5/2012 



H-643-3822 Selectboard Rep. 



Hanover Finance Committee - 3 year term - Appointed by Town Moderator & Hanover School District Moderator 



9/2011 
9/2012 
5/2012 
9/2012 
9/2010 
School Rep. 
Selectboard Rep. 
Selectboard Rep. Alt. 



Tom Blinkhorn, 6 Meadow Lane, Hanover H-643-9863 

Kristi Fenner, 8 Carriage Lane, Hanover H-643- 1251 

Chr. William F. Garrity, 1 12 King Rd., Etna H-643- 1 784 

Michael Gerling, 16 Chandler Road, Etna H-643-4339 

John Hochreiter, 12 Ruddsboro Rd., Etna H-643-6658 

Steve Woods, 16 Dresden Road, Hanover H-643-0276 

Peter L. Christie, PO Box 2, Etna H-448-1737 

Athos J. Rassias, 14 Carriage Lane, Hanover H-643-4602 

Hanover Improvement Society 

Brian F. Walsh, 52 Berrill Farms Lane, Hanover H-643-8296 Selectboard Rep. 

Howe Library Board of Trustees - 3 year term 

chr. Ann Bradley, 5 Fox Field Lane, Hanover H-643-4369 

Joan Collison, 7 Pleasant St., Hanover H-643-5748 

Linda Dacey, 12 Mulherrin Road, Hanover H-643 -4524 

William Dietrich, PO Box 9, Etna H-643-3776 

Arthur Gardiner, 8 Sargent St., Hanover H-643-8342 

William Ghezzi, 67 Lebanon St., Hanover H-643-0447 

Jane Kitchel McLaughlin, 12 Downing Rd, Hanover H-643-2948 

vchrToni LaMonica, 14 Mitchell Lane, Hanover H-643-3628 

Steven Lubrano, 30 Goodfellow Rd., Etna H-643-1213 

Treas Mado MacDonald, 19 Rip Road, Hanover H-643-3 129 

sec. Philip McCaull, 62 Union Village Rd., Norwich H-649-1972 

Jay Pierson, 3 1 Partridge Road, Etna H-643-3279 

Mary Proom, 13 Rip Rd., Hanover H-643-5343 

Devinder S. Sodhi, 6 Dunster Drive, Hanover H-643-6862 

Judith A. Doherty, 97 Greensboro Road, Hanover H-643-4071 

Kate Connolly, 2 Pleasant Street, Hanover H-643-3822 

Mary White, Director of Howe Library W-640-325 1 

Parking and Transportation Board - 3 year term - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

cochr Bill Barr, 1 Rope Ferry Road, Hanover W-646-3396 9/201 1 (College Rep.) 



Elected by Howe Corporation at Annual Meeting 

2009 

2011 

2010 

2010 

2010 

2011 

2010 

2011 

2011 

2009 

2009 

2009 

2010 

2010 

Selectboard Rep. 

Selectboard Rep. Alt. 

Ex-Officio 



97 



Richard Brannen, 3 Quail Drive, Etna 
Matt Marshall, Two Mile Road, Etna 
Janet Rebman, Box 5105, Hanover 
Vacancy 
Vacancy 
Vacancy 

William R. Baschnagel, 65 Trescott Road, Etna 
Jonathan Edwards, Planning/Zoning Director 
Julia N. Griffin, Town Manager 
Patrick O'Neill, Parking Division 
UVLSRPC 

Nick Giaccone, Police Chief 
Peter Kulbacki, Public Works Director 
Parks and Recreation Board - 3 year term - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

Kathy Boghosian, 9 Pine Drive, Hanover 
vchr., Hanover 

Jeff Graham, 594 Hanover Center Road, Hanover 

Jack Lee, 10 Spencer Rd., Hanover 

David Parsons, 1 00 Three Mile Road, Hanover 
chr. Jill Polli, 8 Granger Circle, Hanover 

Jay Rozzi, 33 Carriage Lane, Hanover 

Brian F. Walsh, 52 Berrill Farms Lane, Hanover 
Planning Board - 3 year term - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

vchr.William Dietrich, PO Box 9, Etna 
chr. Judith Esmay, 7 Read Road, Hanover 

Charles Faulkner, 9 Buell Street, Hanover 

Joan Garipay, 4 Ledge Rd., Hanover 

James Hornig, 80 Lyme Road, #159, Hanover 

Michael Mayor, 147 Three Mile Road, Hanover 

Vacancy., Hanover 

Michael Hingston, PO Box 344, Etna 

Peter Owens, 7 Sargent Street, Hanover 

Iain Sim, 10 Dairy Lane, Hanover 

Kate Connolly, 2 Pleasant Street, Hanover 

Peter L. Christie, PO Box 2, Etna 
Senior Citizen Advisory Committee - 3 year term - Appointed 
chr. Chrysanthi Bien, 80 Lyme Road, #171, Hanover 

Marilyn "Willy" Black, 2 Dayton Drive, Hanover 

Joan Blandin, 42 Lebanon St. B-8, Hanover 

Marilyn Blodgett, A-2 Summer Park, Hanover 

Constance Carr, 39 Gibson Road, Hanover 

Barbara Doyle, 6 Tyler Road, Hanover 

Maureen Hall, 80 Lyme Road, #412, Hanover 

Sue Matless, 1 7 Rayton Road, Hanover 

Lee Monaco, A-8 Summer Park, Hanover 

Shirley Montgomery, 46 River Road, Hanover 

Nancy C. Pierce, 259 Dogford Rd., Etna 

Anah Pytte, PO Box 569, Etna 

Helene Rothermund, 4 1 Berrill Farms, Hanover 

Evelyn Spiegel, 80 Lyme Rd., Hanover 

Vacancy 



H-643-3187 


9/2011 


H-643-9321 


9/2010 


W-643-3115 


9/2010 (Chamber Rep.) 


H-643- — 


9/2009 


H-643- — 


9/2006 




Planning Board Rep. 


W-643-2972 


Community Rep. 


W-640-3212 




W-640-3211 




W-640-3219 




448-1680 




W-640-3323 




W-643-3327 




•d of Selectmen 




H-643-4344 


9/2009 


H-643 - 


9/2010 


H-643-3386 


9/2010 


H-643-4168 


9/2009 


H-653-0080 


9/2011 


H-643- 1991 


9/2010 


H-643-3601 


9/2011 


H-643-8296 


Selectboard Rep. 


H-643-3776 


9/2010 


H-643 -9085 


9/2010 


H-643-3132 


9/2011 


H-643-4617 


9/2012 


H-643 -3 766 


9/2011 


H-643-3421 


9/2011 


H-643- 


9/2010 


H-643-2843 


9/20 10 Alt 


H-643-9053 


9/2009 Alt. 


H-643-8711 


9/20 12 Alt. 


H-643-3822 


Selectboard Rep. 


H-448-1737 


Selectboard Rep. 1 st Alt. 


. by Board of Selectmen 


H-643-5524 


9/2012 


H-643-8622 


9/2010 


H-643-???? 


9/2012 


H-643 -1245 


9/2011 


H-643-3518 


9/2012 


H-643 -3 197 


9/2010 


H-643 -42 15 


9/2011 


H-643-5391 


9/2010 


H-643 -0089 


9/2010 


H-643 -293 7 


9/2011 


H-643-9311 


9/2011 


H-643-3044 


9/2012 


H-643-5351 


9/2009 


H-643-4353 


9/2010 


H-643- — 


9/2008 



98 



Myra Johnson, HR Director, Town of Hanover W-640-320X 

Katherine S. Connolly, 2 Pleasant Street, Hanover H-643-3822 

Gail Schaal, 42 Lebanon St., Hanover W-643-553 1 

Jessica Eakin, Youth-in-Action, PO Box 445, Hanover 
Sustainable Hanover Committee - 3 year term - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 



Staff Rep. 

Sclcctboard Rep. 

Senior Center Coordinator 



Marilyn "Willy" Black, 2 Dayton Drive, Hanover H-643-8622 

Mary Ann Cadwallader, 23 Rip Road, Hanover H-643-1343 
Chris Hoskin, 1 OB Parade Ground Road, Etna H-643-294 1 9/20 1 

Antoinette K. Jeffery, PO Box 305, Etna H-643-2336 

Chris Kennedy, 9 Kingsford Road, Hanover H-643-6252 

CoChr. Larry Litten, 40 School Street, Hanover H-643-1859 

CoChr. Lyn Swett Miller, 22 Rip Road, Hanover H-643-8764 

Chris Soderquist, 1 1 Sargent Street, Hanover H-653-0228 
Marissa Knodel, Dartmouth Representative 
Emily Newmann, Sustainable Hanover Steering Committee Rep. 

Brian F. Walsh, 52 Berrill Farms Lane, Hanover H-643-8296 

Peter Kulbacki, PO Box 483, Hanover W-643-3327 

Betsy Smith, PO Box 483, Hanover W-643-3327 

Supervisors of the Checklist - 6 year term - Ballot Vote 

Elaine Hawthorne, PO Box 483, Hanover H-643-2988 

Arlene Mahler, PO Box 483 , Hanover H-643-3 252 

Linda McWilliams, PO Box 483, Hanover H-643-6565 

Trustees of Trust Funds - 3 year term - Ballot Vote 

Brian Doyle, 16 Downing Road, Hanover H-643-7147 

Chr. Paul Gardent, 8 Woodcock Lane, Etna H-643-2790 

Judson (Jay) Pierson, 3 1 Partridge Road, Etna H-643-3279 

Upper Valley - Lake Sunapee Council Representatives 

Vacancy W-643 

William Dietrich, PO Box 9, Etna H-643-3776 

Katherine S. Connolly, 2 Pleasant Street, Hanover H-643-3822 
Zoning Board of Adjustment - 3 year term - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

Gert Assmus, 2 Conant Road, Hanover H-643-3 644 

vchrWilliam Dietrich, PO Box 9, Etna H-643-3776 

Chr. Arthur Gardiner, 8 Sargent Street, Hanover H-643-1990 

Stephen R. Marion, 15 Low Road, Hanover H-643-4230 

Carolyn Radisch, 7 Sargent Street, Hanover H-643-9053 

Maureen Bolton, 1 1 Storrs Road, Hanover H-277-9003 

Sheila Buckley, 8 Weatherby Road, Hanover H-643-5359 

Ruth J. Lappin, 80 Lyme Road, #329, Hanover H-643-1334 

H. Bernard Waugh, 16 Pinneo Hill, Hanover H-643-2479 



9/2011 
9/20 1 1 

9/2009 

9/2012 

9/2012 

9/2010 

9/2010 

9/2012 

9/2012 

Selectboard Rep. 

Director of Public Works 

Public Works Rep. 

5/2014 
5/2012 
5/2010 

5/2010 
5/2011 
5/2012 

9/2009 
Selectboard Rep. 

9/2010 
9/2010 
9/2011 
9/2012 
9/2011 
9/2012AK. 
9/2011 Alt. 
9/2012 Alt. 
9/2010 Alt. 



99 



Other Information 



Director of Administrative Services and Deputy Town Clerk (Finance Director) 

Betsy McClain, PO Box 483, Hanover W-640-3203 

Director of Assessing 

Michael Ryan, PO Box 483, Hanover W-640-3206 

Fence Viewers - 1 year term - Nominated at Town Meeting by Majority Vote 

William F. Garrity, 1 12 King Rd., Etna 

Vacancy 

Robert Morris, PO Box 296, Etna 
Fire Chief 

Roger Bradley, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Health Officer 

William E. Boyle, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Deputy Health Officer 

Carolyn Murray, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Human Resources Director 

Myra Johnson, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Library Director 

Mary White - Howe Library 

PO Box 483, Hanover 

Barbara Price - Etna Library 

PO Box 483, Hanover 
Moderator - 2 year term - Ballot Vote 

Daniel M. Nelson 
Parks and Recreation Director 

Hank Tenney, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Pine Park Commissioner - 3 year term - Nominated at Town Meeting by Majority Vote 

Linda Fowler, 5 Webster Terrace, Hanover H-643-1321 5/2010 

Director of Planning and Zoning 

Jonathan Edwards, PO Box 483, Hanover W-640-3212 

Police Chief 

Nicholas Giaccone, Jr., PO Box 483, Hanover W-640-3323 

Director of Public Works 

Peter Kulbacki, PO Box 483, Hanover W-640-3371 

Surveyors of Wood and Timber -1 year term - Nominated at Town Meeting by Majority Vote 

Ed Chamberlain, 20 Wolfeboro Road, Etna 

John Richardson, 97 Dogford Road, Etna 
Town Clerk - 3 year term - Ballot Vote 

Charlie Garipay, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Tax Collector 

Elizabeth "Liz" Meade, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Town Manager 

Julia N. Griffin, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Treasurer - Appointed by Board of Selectmen 

Patricia Coutermarsh, PO Box 483, Hanover 
Wastewater Treatment Superintendent 

Kevin Mac Lean, PO Box 483, Hanover 



H-643-1784 


5/2010 


H-643-???? 


5/2010 


H-643-0712 


5/2010 


W-640-3340 




643-0701 




643-0701 




W-640-3208 




W-640-3251 




W-643-3116 




H-643-0399 


5/2010 


W-640-3302 





H-643-4150 


5/2010 


H-643-5381 


5/2010 


W-640-3201 


5/2010 


W-640-3201 




W-643-0701 




H-640-3204 




W-643-2362 





100 



Advisory Board of Assessors Report 

The Advisory Board of Assessors hears property tax abatement requests and makes abatement 
recommendations to the Board of Selectmen. Three members are elected and each serves a three- 
year term. The Board of Selectmen appoints one Selectmen's representative and one alternate to 
serve on the Advisory Board. 

Activities: In calendar year 2009, the Advisory Board of Assessors met six times and heard thirty- 
five Tax Year 2008 abatement requests. Twenty abatement recommendations were forwarded to the 
Selectmen. Two applicants filed an appeal beyond the local level to the Board of Tax and Land 
Appeals and both have been withdrawn prior to this report. Deadline for filing an abatement 
application for Tax Year 2008 was March 1 , 2009. 

Meeting Times: The Board schedules its meetings as the yearly abatement caseload demands. 

Advisory Board Members: Paul Young, Richard Birnie and Joe Roberto. 
Select Board Representatives: Katherine Connolly, and Brian Walsh, Alternate. 



Affordable Housing Commission 

The Hanover Affordable Housing Commission (HAHC) was established by action of the 
Selectboard in September 2001 as a commission under its jurisdiction. In 2009 Town Meeting voted 
to establish a Housing Commission, as a restructuring of the Affordable Housing Commission, 
pursuant to RSA 673:1, and other pertinent New Hampshire Statutes which govern municipal 
commissions, their conduct, and their receipt of appropriated funds to carry out their charge, 
according to terms and conditions to be determined by the Selectboard. The name of the 
Commission remains the same. 

The purpose of the Commission is to develop and recommend to appropriate boards of the Town of 
Hanover permanently affordable housing policies and regulations; promote affordable housing; 
identify Town resources that could assist in the effort to provide affordable housing; study suitable 
sites in the Town for affordable housing; explore and recommend partnerships with existing 
organizations such as Twin Pines Housing Trust and Habitat for Humanity; evaluate and report the 
effectuation of Town policies on affordable housing; represent the Town at regional meetings; and 
serve as an educational resource for the community. 

Members are Bruce Altobelli; Len Cadwallader; Don Derrick; Paul Olsen; James Reynolds; Robert 
Strauss, Chair; and Andrew Winter. Joan Collison serves as Alternate Member, and Judy Doherty is 
the Selectboard's representative to the Commission. The Commission appreciates the long and 
thoughtful service given by Roy Banwell and Charlotte Faulkner, both of whom retired from the 
Commission in 2009, and by Peter Christie, who had served as the Selectboard's representative to 
the Commission. 

Gile Hill: The development known as Gile Hill, which started in 2001, was shepherded by the 
HAHC through concept, preliminary design, and into project management by Twin Pines Housing 
Trust and the Hartland Group. The development was dedicated by Governor Lynch in October 2007. 

101 



Eight buildings are now open and fully occupied. They contain 61 rentals, and 16 ownership units. 
Two additional buildings containing 20 condo units are under construction and will be opened in the 
Spring of 2010. The remaining 23 condo units in the final two buildings are planned for occupancy 
in the Spring of 2012. 

In-Town Housing: The HAHC has been studying the possibilities of various In-Town sites for 
affordable housing. The Commission is also working cooperatively with Dartmouth College on the 
planning of off-campus housing for its employees. 



Hanover Bicycle/Pedestrian Committee (HBPC) 

Report for 2010 

The HBPC is an advisory committee to the Hanover Select Board. The committee works to improve 
biking and pedestrian opportunities in Hanover. It meets the first Thursday of the month at 4 pm at 
the Howe Library. The public is encouraged to attend. Activities in 2010: 

• "Sharrow" demonstration project on Lebanon Street near the Hanover High was painted on the road, 
promoted and is under observation. "Sharrow" education completed included a poster that was 
displayed at town meeting and other locations and a flyer was distributed. Also, an info booth and 
lifesize sharrow example at the Prouty Dinner Event. 

• Upper Valley Cycling and Walking Tour 10/15 was coordinated by Doug Deaett of the HBPC. 
Participants from the NHDOT, Upper Valley Trails Alliance, Hanover DPW and others joined to 
pedal, study, and plan. The route included Centerra, DHMC, Hypertherm, Gile Tract, Conservation 
Council, Green, King Arthur Flour, Wilder Dam, Mascoma Greenway, Advance Transit and others. 
The Route 120 Bike/PedVConservation masterplan was the central focus. 

• Bike Map of Hanover on Google Earth was completed. 

• South and North Park Street bicycle and pedestrian planning was initiated with ORW Consultants and 
continues with Peter Kulbacki, Director of Public Works. A thoughtful analysis and photo 
documentation of pedestrian challenges was completed by the HBPC. Implementation of final 
recommendations is anticipated in 201 1. 

• Pedestrian planning was expanded including a merging of bicycle and pedestrian visions and goals, a 
request for town wide pedestrian policies and guidelines, and the Park Street study. 

• The Capital Improvement Committee CIP was encouraged to always consider bicycle and pedestrian 
issues in their planning. 

• Bicycle Pedestrian Committee blog was launched. 

• ORW Landscape Architects and Planners/Smart Mobility were selected from two submitted proposals 
as the primary consultant to the town for HBPC consulting. 

• "Sweep Spot" project was approved to place a broom and shovel at commonly dirty bike lane 
locations. Bikers are volunteering to own and clean the sweep spots as needed. 

• "Safe Routes to School" application was submitted to New Hampshire Department of Transportation 
to fund a planning study. Decision is pending. 

Committee Members: Hugh Mellert (Chair), Tim Cox, Doug Deaett, Scot Drysdale, Matthew 
Marshall, Bob Norman, Carol Perera Weingeist, Joanna Whitcomb, Bill Young, Charles R. Sullivan, 
Barbara Mcllroy, John Leigh, Athos Rassias, Selectboard Representative. 

102 



Building Code Advisory Committee 

The Building Code Advisory Committee advises the Building Inspector and the Planning and 
Zoning Department on matters pertaining to building construction, safety, codes, and technological 
changes. The committee also acts in the capacity of a building codes appeals committee. Their 
combined expertise in construction is a valuable asset to the Zoning Board of Adjustment in matters 
of appeals regarding the Building Inspectors' decisions, interpretations of code requirements, or 
allowing the use of new technologies. 

No appeals were brought forward to the committee in 2009. 

In 2009 the Chair of The Building Code Advisory Committee, Bruce Williamson, along with 
Planning and Zoning Staff and Planning Board members undertook an extensive review of the 
Building Permit application process for one- and two-family residential projects. The primary 
purpose of the review was to find opportunities for streamlining the process in order to create greater 
efficiency for applicants as well as staff in the review and permitting process. The numerous hours 
given by this group to the process has resulted in a detailed and thorough revision of the one- and 
two-family permit application. The next step will be to update and revise the permit application 
checklist. This step has already begun and will continue to undergo revision during 2010. 

It has been an active year for the New Hampshire State Building Code Board as they have been 
engaged in the public hearings and adoption process for the 2009 edition of the International 
Building Codes. As a community that actively enforces the state-adopted building codes, Hanover 
has a keen interest to understand the changes and potential impacts to the construction industry. 

One aspect of construction that we will see impacted by changes will be in energy conservation. The 
2009 edition of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains significant changes 
that, by Department of Energy (DOE) estimates, has the potential for increase in energy savings of at 
least 15% over current minimum code standards. Quoting from the DOE website: 

"When incorporated into the 2009 IECC, approved proposals will result in energy savings 
totaling at least 15 percent, and perhaps as much as 18 to 20 percent, as compared to the 2006 
IECC. The 2009 IECC represents an increase in energy efficiency that is unprecedented in 
IECC history." 

"DOE's 30% Residential Codes Initiative is focused on reducing the energy consumption of 
International Energy Conservation Code® (IECC) compliant homes by 30%, relative to the 
2006 IECC, by the year 2012." 

For a complete listing of Building code adopted in NH along with amendments see the New 
Hampshire State Building Code web site at: 

http://www.nh.gov/safetv/boardsandcommissions/bldgcode/index.html 

The 2009 Edition of the Building Codes is anticipated to be effective in New Hampshire on April 1 , 
2010. As always, please check with us for any local amendments or assistance with the various 
building codes applicable to your project. 



103 



The construction and permitting process can, at times, be complicated. Be assured that we want to 
assist you to have a successful, safe and compliant project and are available to assist you with any 
aspect of the permitting and inspection process. 

The Building Code Advisory Committee consists of the following members: Bruce Williamson, 
Chair; Randy Mudge, Secretary; and Jack Wilson. 

The Building Code Advisory Committee continues to function with two vacancies and is always 
seeking individuals that would be interested in serving. If you are interested in serving on this 
committee please send a written request to the Town Manager's office. 

Building Inspections 
Activity in 2009 

New One- and Two-Family Residences: 

Number of Permits Issued 8 

Total Value of All Permits $ 3,816,360 

Average Permit Value $ 477,045 

Additions, Alterations, & Maintenance to One- & Two-Family Residences: 

Number of Permits Issued 149 

Total Value of All Permits $ 7,634,213 

Average Permit Value $ 51,236 

New Multi-Family and Additions & Alterations: 

Number of Permits Issued 24 

Total Value of All Permits $ 9,573,123 

Average Permit Value $ 398,880 

New Institutional Buildings: 

Number of Permits Issued 3 

Total Value of All Permits $ 14,8 1 0,945 

Average Permit Value $ 4,936,982 

Additions & Alterations to Existing Institutional Buildings: 

Number of Permits Issued 28 

Total Value of All Permits $101,650,635 

Average Permit Value $ 3,630,380 

New Commercial Buildings and Additions & Alterations: 

Number of Permits Issued 33 

Total Value of All Permits $ 13,726,671 

Average Permit Value $ 4 1 5 ,960 

Demolition Permits: 

Number of Permits Issued 1 3 

Blanket Permits: 

Number of Permits Issued 1 

Total Permits: 

Number of Permits Issued 259 

Total Value of All Permits $151,211,947 

Average Permit Value $ 583,830 

Total Fees Collected $ 468,566 

104 



Conservation Commission 

The Conservation Commission was established by the 1966 Hanover Town Meeting "for the proper 
utilization and protection of the natural resources and for the protection of watershed resources of 
Hanover." (NH RSA Chapter 36-A). Important natural resources include wetlands, water bodies and 
groundwater, all critical for our water supply, the Town Forest and other conserved lands, trails and 
other open space, scenic views, and wildlife habitat. The Commission is responsible for educating 
the public about natural resource topics, monitoring conservation easements, and coordinating with 
other public and private conservation agencies. The Commission supports and advises the Board of 
Selectmen, the Planning Board, and the Zoning Board of Adjustment regarding policies and projects 
involving conservation issues. 

Members of the Commission at year-end 2009 are Judith Reeve, Chair; Edwin Chamberlain, Vice- 
Chair; Douglas Mcllroy; Anne Morris; Michael Mayor; and Sandra White. Ray Hogue is an 
alternate member. With the retirement of William Baschnagel from the Selectboard, we lost our 
long-time liaison with that Board. Our new representative from the Board of Selectmen is Athos 
Rassias. 

This year, long-time vice-chair, Robin Carpenter, retired. Robin has been an effective and efficient 
vice-chairperson and dedicated easement monitor. We thank both Robin and Bill for their service 
and interesting perspectives on conservation matters. 

For their tireless work keeping our trails safe and open to the public, we thank Ledyard Bank Lend a 
Hand Day volunteers, Youth in Action, Dartmouth Outing Club, Tuck School, Tom Linell, Larry 
Litten, Peter Shumway, Bill Mlacek, Steve Lubrano, and "retired" Ron Bailey. Special thanks to 
Elisha Huggins for maintaining trails on Moose Mountain. 

Thanks also to Open Space Committee members, Jim Hornig and Carolyn Tenney, for their time and 
creative conservation ideas, and to Barbara Mcllroy, for organizing and energizing many work days 
on Town conservation land to control invasive plants in order to conserve to our native flora. 

The Commission would also like to acknowledge the generosity of Ann and Harte Crow in donating 
a conservation easement on 239 acres on Goose Pond Road to the Upper Valley Land Trust. This 
conservation easement will protect the property from future development or activities that might be 
harmful to habitat and resources on the property. Pressey Brook and Tunis Brook flow through the 
property and create a large wetland complex with valuable wildlife habitat. Sustainable forestry, low 
impact recreation and wildlife habitat improvements are among the activities that will take continue 
to take place on the land. The Crow property is located in the Moose Mountain East conservation 
and recreation area identified in our Open Space Priorities Plan as one of ten areas in Town where 
conservation efforts should be focused. 

Conservation Commission Activities in 2009: In order to better understand the natural resources 
south of Mink Brook and to better support wildlife in the Route 120 corridor, the Commission hired 
Rick Van de Poll, a principal with Ecosystem Management Consultants, to inventory the natural 
features. He regaled the Commission, landowners in the study area and members of the public who 
attended his presentations in April and November with a wealth of information about our flora and 
fauna in that section of Town. His work was funded using $15,000 from our Conservation Fund and 
will be used to make conservation and land use plans in that area of Town. It is significant that this 

105 



inventory was conducted in conjunction with a city-wide natural resources inventory in Lebanon, 
concurrently undertaken by Mr. Van de Poll. 

The Commission upgraded the annual conservation easement monitoring program by hiring Vicki 
Smith to monitor the 2 1 properties protected by conservation easements or restrictions. In addition 
to visiting each property, Vicki took additional time to document the condition of the properties and 
to contact the 48 owners to clarify easement provisions and observations from the monitoring visits. 

Through the Open Space Committee, the Commission worked with several landowners to educate 
and support them in conservation opportunities on their property including appraising the value of 
conservation easements and negotiating easement terms. The Commission also discussed 
conservation opportunities south of Mink Brook and in the Moose Mountain East area with a 
developer/landowner, The Nature Conservancy and the Hanover Conservation Council. 

Through its Trails Committee, the Commission: 

Updated the Town Trail Map available in paper copy at the Town Offices and on-line at the town 

website; 

With the assistance of volunteers from Ledyard Bank, removed invasive plants and improved 

the footpath between Hovey Lane and Currier Place; 

Realigned and benched a trail at Rinker Tract and naturalized the steep erodible bank it formerly 

climbed; 

Completed a 1-mile re-routing of an unsightly section of the Ridge Trail on Moose Mountain; 

Scouted a trail easement near Etna Highlands Road and a connection between Pasture Road and 

the Baum Conservation Area; 

Following invasive removal, re-vegetated areas along Old Highway 38 with native species; 

Performed routine trail maintenance, including drainage and the cleanup of downed trees, 

overhanging snags and trash. 

The Commission spent over $2,500 from its operating account for contracted assistance in 
maintaining trails. 

Other Activities: In cooperation with the Hanover Garden Club, volunteers worked to remove 
invasive plants at the entrance to Old Highway 38. Some of the abutting neighbors also removed 
invasive plants from their yards in order to support the effort to keep a healthy balance of native 
species on our conservation lands and in their yards. 

The Commission continued to work with the Hanover Conservation Council to remove burning bush 
and bitter sweet from Balch Hill conservation lands, spending $100 from the operations budget for 
this work. 

The Commission partnered with Ledyard Bank for trail work on Lend a Hand Day and now receives 
a dollar for street trees and native plant restoration for every Ledyard account that goes paperless. 

Survey work was completed on the Town's Mink Brook conservation lands, including the posting of 
signs about dumping and cutting on town land. This multi-year project cost $18,000, some of which 
came from the operating fund and the rest from the Conservation Fund. 

The Commission paid $600 from the Conservation Fund for a survey of some of the boundaries of 
the Tanzi Tract along Mink Brook. 

106 



Two warrant articles were sponsored by the Conservation Commission and approved by Town 
Meeting 2009 to enable the Commission to support conservation projects undertaken by other 
conservation organizations and for land in other communities. 

The Commission worked with landowners to address cutting trees on town owned land to improve 
views, and to allow tree cutting, a new trail and a privy on land restricted by conservation easements 
monitored by the Commission. 

The Commission developed policies concerning hunting on the Town-owned Dana property, 
vegetation management on Town-owned lands, and expenditures from the Conservation Fund for 
open space protection. 

The Commission conducted 14 site visits to review proposals and commented on 10 proposed 
projects within wetland or waterbody setbacks for the property owners, Zoning Administrator, 
Zoning Board of Adjustment, Planning Board, and State of NH Wetlands Bureau. 

The Commission suggested open space and trail projects to be considered for inclusion in the Capital 
Improvements Plan, currently being drafted by town staff. 

Collaboration continued with the Hanover Conservation Council, Hanover Garden Club, Boy Scout 
Troop 45, Pine Park Association, Youth- in- Action, Upper Valley Mountain Bike Association, Upper 
Valley Land Trust, Upper Valley Trails Alliance, the Mascoma Watershed Conservation Council, 
the Goose Pond Lake Association with $900 support for the Lake Host Program, the Appalachian 
Trail Conservancy, the Lebanon Conservation Commission and the NH Association of Conservation 
Commissions with $500 support for dues. 

The Conservation Commission's regularly scheduled monthly meetings are held on the second 
Wednesday of each month at 5:00 PM, in Town Hall. The Open Space and Trails Committees meet 
regularly once a month while the other committees of the Commission meet as necessary for project 
needs. The Commission and its committees are always eager for wider participation. Please contact 
the Planning and Zoning Office for these meeting schedules. 



Conservation Fund Balances 





Balance @ 






Balance @ 




7/1/2008 


Deposits 


Withdrawals 


6/30/2009 


Conservation Commission General 










Purpose Funds 


$508,534 


$15,329 


$(112,200) 


$411,663 


Conservation Easement 










Stewardship Fund 


$-0- 


$100,606 


$-0- 


$100,606 



107 



Conservation Commission 
Activity in 2009 

Meetings 1 3 
Presentations on Mink Brook 

Highlands Natural Resource Inventory 2 

Site Visits 14 

Cases: 

Docks 
Additions, Structures, or Fill in 

Wetland or Wetland Buffer 1 

Open Space Subdivision 

Other _0 

Total Number of Cases 1 



Etna Library Board of Trustees 

The Hanover Town Library, or Etna Library, has been an architectural and cultural landmark in the 
Village of Etna for over 100 years. 

The mission of the Hanover Town Library is to be an active presence in the village, providing its 
services to the community in a personal manner while preserving its historic building. Head 
Librarian Barbara Prince and Assistant Librarian Mary King have fulfilled this mission with warmth 
and enthusiasm. 

The Etna Library maintains a circulating collection of approximately 8,000, and hosts a full schedule 
of programs targeted towards toddlers, school children and adults. The library is a popular venue for 
book groups and this year has become the village hub for wireless Internet service. 

The librarians are assisted in their efforts by substitute librarians Caroline Tischbein, Stephanie 
Snelling and Jayne Costello, and a host of volunteers who staff the library on Saturday mornings, 
shuttle books to and from the Howe Library, and help with the annual pie and book sales. 

The Trustees of the Hanover Town Library are elected by Hanover voters, serve three-year terms, 
and meet monthly to oversee the operations of the library. The Trustees wish to thank the librarians 
and volunteers for their superb service to the library this year. 

Members of the Board of Trustees: Christine Bentivoglio, Jean M. Keene, and Rhonda N. S. Siegel 



108 



l-TOW/P ) ^ ne Howe Library Corporation 

Board of Trustees Annual Report 

Expand your world. ' 



The Board meets on the second Thursday of each month at 3:30 p.m, except during July and August. 
The Corporation's Annual Meeting is the second Thursday in October. 

Development Program 2009: The primary purpose of the Corporation's Development Program is 
to increase the funding for the library facility and collections enhancements beyond what can be 
expected from tax revenues. 

In September, with advice from current and former trustees, the Board of Trustees adopted a 
Development Program Plan which will operate under and advise the Board with respect to: 

• Status of and goals of the Development Program; 

• Candidates for possible leadership positions in the Development Program; 

• Possible changes in policies, procedures and other aspects of the Development Program; 

• Other matters as the Board may request of the Committee. 

Membership on this Committee will be composed of the chairs of the Annual Fund Drive, Planned 
Giving, Special Campaigns, Events Committee, and the Development Coordinator. Also included in 
membership as ex officio members are the Board Chair and the Library Director. The remaining 
membership of the Committee shall be annually appointed by the Chair of the Board of Trustees 
from among the Trustees and members of the general public. 

We are working very hard to tie development and programming together so that donors clearly 
understand the benefits of a successful development program. Howe remains an outstanding facility 
in large part because of the working relationship between Howe Library and The Howe Library 
Corporation. 

Committee Highlights: 

Annual Fund Drive : Jane Kitchel McLaughlin, Chair 

Proceeds from the Annual Appeal help pay for approximately 27% of the library's operating costs. 
They are used to enhance collections and computers as well as funding adult and children's special 
programs. Earnings from the Corporation's unrestricted endowment funds are needed to repay the 
$1.8 million USDA loan for the library renovation and expansion project, which was completed in 
2005. The goal for the 2009-10 Annual Fund is $100,000. As of this writing, in the 5 th month of the 
campaign, giving has reached 71% of this goal. 

Events Committee : Ann Malenka, Chair 

This committee is responsible for raising funds through special events. A wine tasting held at Howe 
on March 27, 2009 raised $12,864 after expenses, an increase in net revenue of $3,287 over the 2007 
wine tasting. The event included a silent auction of photographs from the 33 rd Annual Elden Murray 
Photographic Exhibition and a variety of wines and local foods. This year we plan another wine 



109 



tasting at Howe on March 26, which will be similar to last year's event in format and content, 
including the silent auction from the Murray Photographic Exhibition. 

Finance Committee : Arthur Gardiner, Chair 

Ledyard Financial Advisers manage the library's investment funds with oversight from the Board's 
Finance Committee. The Finance Committee meets periodically to review the management 
arrangements and the investment performance of the funds. 

Nonresident Fee Committee : The Nonresident Fee Committee has met since 1995 to advise the 
Howe Board on annual fees for non-residents to borrow from the library. The recommendation from 
the Howe Board then has gone to the Selectmen who have the ultimate authority to determine fees. 
The Howe Board voted this past fall, with the knowledge of the Board of Selectmen, to disband this 
advisory committee and rely on the Board of Selectmen representative to the Howe Board to relay 
any recommendations on this matter from Board and library staff to the Board of Selectmen. 

Facilities Committee : Devinder Sodhi, Chair 

This committee meets annually with Frank Austin, Facilities and Fleet Manager for the Town of 
Hanover. Issues currently being addressed include ensuring that the HVAC system is up and 
running before the next cooling season, installing brighter lights in the front lobby, and replacing 
carpeting around the Circulation desk, and correcting a leak at the front entry. 

Ann Bradley, Chair, The Howe Library Corporation Board of Trustees 

Howe Library - a partnership of The Howe Library Corporation and the Town of Hanover 
13 South Street Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 603.643.4120 www.howelibrary.org 



Parking & Transportation Board 

The Parking & Transportation Board advises the Board of Selectmen on matters relating to parking, 
traffic, public transportation, parking facility and other related activities in Hanover. They also 
review and advise on the use of parking generated funds and expenditures. Membership includes 
representatives from town businesses, Dartmouth College, the Chamber of Commerce and 
volunteers from the community. The Board meets at 4:00 PM on the second Tuesday of each month 
in Town Hall. 

In 2009 the Parking & Transportation Board provided input on Central Business District initiatives 
to improve communication with customers. These initiatives included the "Parking Car-ma" project, 
which offered seven ways communicated through print and radio ads to make finding a parking 
space in downtown Hanover easier and more convenient. The PTB also helped design new holiday 
bags used to cover downtown meters during approved free parking periods in December. The dark 
green fabric bags prominently display the Hanover logo. 

The PTB provided on-going advice to Town staff during the year as they worked with Dartmouth 
officials in creating a Memorandum of Understanding between the Town and Dartmouth. This 
agreement will lead to Dartmouth providing additional spaces in the downtown for use by the public 
and managed by the Town. 



110 



The PTB seeks new members and citizen input. Interested parties can contact Lt. Patrick O'Neill at 
Town Hall at 640-3219 or by e-mail at partick.oneill(ajhanovernh.orK for more information or to be 
put on the agenda of an upcoming meeting. 



Planning Board 




As part of its study of residential zoning, the Planning Board conducted a series of 
neighborhood tours throughout the summer and fall of 2009. This picture shows 
Planning Board members, Planning and Zoning Department Staff, and citizens in the 
neighborhood west of downtown. 

The year 2009 brought one large and complex project and many small projects for non-residential 
development to the Planning Board for review. Interestingly, perhaps in reflection of the national 
economic downturn, there were no major subdivisions in Hanover in 2009 that created vacant lots. 
One project created four lots on land already developed, and three condominium projects created one 
new commercial unit and allowed the conversion of six residential apartments into six condominium 
units. One new lot was created on Austin Avenue. 

Residents across town are attentive to changes in their neighborhoods and look to the Master Plan, 
local regulations, and the Planning Board to maintain the attractive character of their neighborhoods 
and preserve what they like best about Hanover. In response, the Planning Board has been working 
to develop amendments to the Zoning Ordinance, Subdivision Regulations, and Site Plan Review 
Regulations to implement the Master Plan, by protecting qualities of Hanover that are threatened, 
and while accommodating appropriate types and degrees of development. 

Our major planning emphasis this year has been to understand Hanover's residential neighborhoods 
and what makes them such great places to live. The Board began its work by inviting landowners 
and residents to three public forums held at the Ray School in January. Each public forum focused 
on different parts of Hanover: in-town neighborhoods; rural neighborhoods; and the neighborhoods 
along Route 10, River Road, and Greensboro Road and around Goose Pond. Attendees were asked to 
tell the Planning Board what they appreciate about their neighborhoods and what things concern 
them. 



Ill 



In the spring, summer, and fall, the Planning Board visited in-town neighborhoods on foot and more 
rural and remote neighborhoods in a bus generously provided by Kendal at Hanover. With 
impressions from the public forums and their own observations from their four field trips, the Board 
has begun to work on policies as a basis for re-zoning the area around Goose Pond. This fresh look 
at redefining land use controls in that specific neighborhood will equip the Board with a process of 
looking at other residential neighborhoods and will lead to conversations with residents about the 
changes they would like to see. This neighborhood-by-neighborhood approach will take a few years, 
and the Planning Board looks forward to working with residents and inviting their consideration of 
possible zoning changes at future Town Meetings. 

In addition, the Planning Board significantly revised its Site Plan Regulations. Most of the changes 
are procedural, including the provision for a Minor Project Review (MPR) Committee, a committee 
permitted by statute and authorized by Town Meeting. The MPR Committee, comprising Town 
employees, is empowered to review and permit smaller projects. It will meet to review these 
proposals in public sessions during the day, expediting the approval of applications for minor 
projects. Decisions of the MPR Committee may be appealed to the Planning Board. Small projects 
that formerly came to the Board for waiver of site plan review will now be heard by the MPR 
Committee. 

The Planning Board work in 2009 included: 

Reviewing and approving site plans: Dartmouth College's Visual Arts Center, loading docks at 

the Hood Museum and Spalding Auditorium, replacement of an oil bunker with a chilled water 

facility, and conversion of an apartment house to a sorority. 

Reviewing and approving modifications to the approved site plan for a 69-bed hotel now under 

construction on South Street. 

Reviewing and approving the creation of one new residential lot on Austin Avenue, four lots 

with existing residences, six residential condominiums and one commercial condominium. 

Reviewing the conceptual design for the Friends of Hanover Crew's conversion of a Lyme Road 

residence and barn to a rowing club facility and installation of a crew dock at Wilson's Landing. 

Reviewing and approving 14 minor lot line adjustments and 14 requests for site plan waiver for 

projects as diverse as a new garage behind the Police Station, handicapped accessible entrances, 

new fences, and the addition of panel antennae to an existing telecommunications tower. 

Making visits to the site proposed for Dartmouth's new Visual Arts Center and to four different 

neighborhoods. 

Holding four working sessions on amendments to the Site Plan and Subdivision Regulations as 

well as nine sessions and three public workshops on Hanover's neighborhoods. 

Conducting educational workshops on innovative land use planning techniques, variance, non 

conforming uses, and traffic engineering. 

Holding one scenic road hearing. 

Preparing zoning amendments that were considered and adopted at the Annual Town Meeting in 

May 2009, holding two hearings on these amendments, and preparing another set of amendments 

to be considered at the Annual Town Meeting in 2010. Over the year, three evenings were spent 

discussing potential zoning changes. 

All of this work was done as the Board has continued to meet regularly to implement the 2003 
Master Plan. The Master Plan and land use regulations may be viewed on the Town's website, 
HanoverNH.org, and copies may be purchased at the Planning and Zoning Office. The Planning 
Board's agendas are also posted at the same website. 



112 



The current members of the Planning Board, as of December 3 1 , 2009, arc Judith Esmay, Chair; Bill 
Dietrich, Vice-Chair; Charles Faulkner; Michael Mayor; James Hornig; and Joan Garipay. Alternate 
members are Michael Hingston and Peter Owens, and Iain Sim, newly appointed. Kate Connolly 
and Peter Christie serve as Board of Selectmen Representative and Alternate Representative, 
respectively. Planning Board members are appointed by the Board of Selectmen. One member 
serves on the Conservation Commission to provide coordination between the Commission and 
Planning Board. Two other Board members are active representatives to the Upper Valley Lake 
Sunapee Regional Planning Commission. 

It was with deep gratitude that Planning Board members and staff bid Nancy Collier and Bill 
Baschnagel goodbye in 2009. Nancy served on the Planning Board since 1 997 and assumed its chair 
in 1999. An accomplished leader, Nancy guided the Board through its adoption of the Master Plan in 
2003 and served on a number of Planning Board committees. Bill was a strong advocate for ends- 
based regulation and deliberate decision-making especially when transportation and parking were 
concerned. Nancy and Bill's contributions to the Planning Board will long outlast their tenure and 
are much appreciated. 

Generally, the Planning Board hears applications for subdivision and site plan review at 7:30 PM on 
the first and third Tuesdays of each month in the Boardroom at Town Hall. The Board holds 
planning workshop sessions to focus on Master Plan implementation and policy development at 7:30 
PM on the second Tuesday of each month. The public is cordially invited to attend and participate in 
all meetings of the Planning Board. The Planning Board welcomes your comments in writing or by 
email at Planning.Board@HanoverNH.org . 

Planning Board 
Activity in 2009 

Planning Board Cases: 

Site Plans 5 

Site Plan Waivers 14 
Planned Residential Developments and 

Continuing Care Retirement Communities 

Major Subdivisions 3 

Minor Subdivisions 2 

Modifications 1 

Lot Line Adjustments/Lot Mergers 14 

Preliminary Plans, Revocations, Extensions, Scenic Roads, other _5 

Subtotal 44 
Other Business: 

Master Plan 18 

Zoning Amendments, Informal Reviews, Site Visits, etc. 23 

Total: 85 



113 



Senior Citizen Advisory Committee 
(Hanover Senior Center) 

The Senior Citizen Advisory Committee meets at 4:00 on the first Monday of each month. The 
meetings are open and all are welcome. 

The members of the board are: Chrysanthi Bien (Chair), Constance Carr, Barbara Doyle, Maureen 
Hall, Evelyn Spiegel, Marilyn "Willy" Black, Anah Pytte, Shirley Montgomery, Peter Christie 
(Select Board Rep.) Lee Monaco, Sue Matless, Nancy Pierce, Marilyn Blodgett, Nora Wijn and Gail 
Schaal (Senior Center Coordinator) 

Our regular schedule is very busy with three very well attended exercise classes a week, and 
bimonthly ceramics classes with volunteer Linda Couture, monthly basket weaving with volunteer 
Ann Collins, a monthly potluck lunch with volunteer musician Roger Tatro, and a Birthday 
celebration with music by Esther Balch. We also have crafts, a toy projects with the toys being 
donated to the Shiner's Hospitals, monthly lunches sponsored and served by the area churches. The 
Dartmouth students are back this year to volunteer their time with computer help. The VNA brings 
two health clinics a month to the center for Blood Pressure and Foot Care. Line dancing has become 
a very popular form of exercise at the Senior Center with instructor Jamie Orr. 

A group also meets at the senior center once a month for an interfaith coffee. We also offer bridge 
on Tuesdays and Thursday afternoon movies. 

Our annual Yard Sale was held on March 27 th 2010 with the proceeds being donated to "WISE". 

All programs at the Richard W. Black Community/Senior Center are open for all seniors at all 
times. Please join us. 



Sustainable Hanover - Celebration 2010 

Report of The Sustainable Hanover Committee 

During the past decade, citizens in Hanover, NH have been working to ensure sustainable prosperity 
and well-being for the community. The 2003 Master Plan provides the Town with a framework for 
preserving the core elements of our Town. As stated in the "Vision for Hanover" section (p.2) of the 
Master Plan, these elements include "a vital urban and campus core surrounded by a traditional rural 
New England Countryside" in which residents enjoy "varied quality of life experiences all over 
Town." 

In this context, residents will have: 

• Convenient and accessible access to open space and year-round recreational opportunities; 

• A variety of neighborhoods with a strong sense of community; 

• An exciting, livable town. 

To achieve this, the following will occur: 

• Automobiles will play less of a role, and residents and the community will be healthier for it; 

114 



• Critical and fragile natural resources will be preserved for the health, enjoyment and 
education of future generations; 

• Less distancing associated with scattered development. 

Since 2003, a growing body of evidence suggests that communities like Hanover, NH must pay 
increasingly close attention to issues associated with climate change, peak oil and sustainability. To 
help manage these pressing issues in the context of the Master Plan, the Sustainable Hanover 
Committee (SHC) is charged with serving as a clearinghouse and collaborative umbrella for 
the many sustainability initiatives occurring in Hanover. Using the Natural Step principles as a 
guide and always taking a systems approach, the SHC promotes learning opportunities for all and 
develops operational goals enabling the community to measure its progress to sustainable prosperity 
and well-being. 

To that end, this report focuses on, (1) a celebration of achievements to date and (2) next steps on 
our path to community sustainability. 

Sustainability Achievements to Date: A Sample of Actions: Sustainability initiatives have 
occurred throughout Hanover — in our schools, our Town, our businesses and homes, and at 
Dartmouth College. Three categories provide a broad framework for understanding our actions. 
Infrastructure achievements involve buildings, roads and other physical features of the community; 
Cultural achievements are changes that people make in their behavior and values that support 
sustainable prosperity and well-being; Learning achievements are the numerous workshops, 
lectures, discussions, films and other gatherings that promote increased understanding of our choices 
for sustainable living. 

Infrastructure: 

• Programmable thermostats installed in all Town facilities over the winter of 2006/07, and 
lowered Town building temperatures, particularly nights and weekends. 

• Chamber of Commerce expanded the Hanover Farmers' Market on the Dartmouth Green. 

• Lawns replaced with wildflower fields to reduce mowing. 

• Expansion of community garden to meet increasing demand; considering a second location 
based on projected demand for 2010. 

• Hanover High School Environmental Club helped create an outdoor classroom that includes 
raised beds for vegetables. To learn more, visit http ://greenteam.dresden.us/ 

• Began replacement of ornamental streetlights on South Main St. and Allen St. with LED 
fixtures; remaining 50 lights to be replaced over next 5-10 years as budget allows. 

• Installed solar pay stations in Marshall Lot parking facility in 2008 and Lebanon St. parking 
lot in 2009. 

• Replacing older traffic signals with LED's to reduce energy consumption: South Main and 
Lebanon St. in 2007, Main and Wheelock and South Main and South St. in 2008. 

• Replaced two Police Department traditional sedans with hybrid Toyota Camry's in 2008 
and replaced large SUV with light-weight, more versatile, significantly higher mpg 
conversion truck in 2009. 

• Implemented transition to B-10 bio-diesel program for our Public Works Department in 
2007. 



115 



• Replaced all windows in Town Hall and will track fuel oil use closely this winter to 
establish pay-back period. 

• Conducted energy audits on town buildings and subsequently invested substantial funds to 
re-insulate, install new windows, install new siding and otherwise tighten up three Senior 
Housing apartment buildings (Summer Park). 

• The Richmond Middle School has installed a small dishwasher in the science lab prep room 
and several homerooms have created a "green" lunch room, where students use their own 
plates, bowls and flatware instead of the disposable items from the cafeteria. The student 
response has been great, and the sixth grade team is purchasing a dishwasher for their lunch 
rooms. 

• No Idling zones have been created at each of the three Hanover schools. 

• Installation of motion detecting lights and energy-saving bulbs in Ray School and Howe 
Library. 

• Conversion to "greener" cleaning products at the Ray School and Howe Library. 

• Paper towel dispensers are now auto-feed at the Howe Library. 

• Increased cost of public printing has reduced number of copies printed at the Howe Library. 
Installation of duplex copying for staff. 

• The Co-op installed a geothermal heating and cooling system at it's new Community 
Market on Lyme Rd in 2008. The Co-op won a Lean and Green award in 2009 for new 
construction (from Business NH Magazine) and UK Architects, the architects, won an award 
in Jan 2010. 

• In 2009, the Co-op conducted comprehensive energy audits for the Hanover and Lebanon 
stores and invested in recommendations that could result in as much as a 10 percent 
reduction in annual greenhouse gas emissions at the Co-op, effective 2010. 

• In 2009, the Co-op began composting inedible food waste and floral waste. The Co-op now 
diverts nearly all organic materials away from the landfill toward higher uses, to the tune of 
287 tons in 2009. 

• Chamber of Commerce Intern evaluated and provided plan to implement recycling for 
downtown Hanover businesses (2009-10). 

• Dartmouth College was awarded a $330,936 grant from the New Hampshire Greenhouse Gas 
Reduction Fund to help implement the campus energy management system, which will 
measure and monitor energy use in near real-time around campus and support Dartmouth's 
commitment to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by 2030. 

• Following two sustainability self-assessments conducted by the College's Resource Working 
Group in 2009, Dartmouth College is drafting a Sustainability Roadmap that identifies 
current practices, future goals, and indicators to measure progress in the areas of energy and 
greenhouse gas emissions, materials and waste management, food and dining, and 
transportation. 

Culture: 

• The Co-op made environmental sustainability a core part of its business: In 2004, the Board 
formalized the Co-op's commitment to environmental sustainability by making it one of the 
Co-op's "Global Ends." (HCCS Global Ends #7: Because of the HCCS there will be a 
thriving business entity that protects and restores the environment.") 



116 



• In 2005-6 the Co-op employed a part-time Sustainability Coordinator. In 2007+ the Co-op 
has employed a full-time Sustainability Coordinator. 

• The Co-op began collecting #5 plastic from shoppers in 2009; more than one ton was 
shipped to Preserve Products during the year. The Co-op also takes back EcoPak clamshell 
containers from Co-op shoppers for recycling. 

• About one half of the Co-op's unsellable organics goes to Willing Hands for distribution to 
food banks and other recipients; about a quarter is diverted to pig farmers; and the remainder 
is composted. 

• The Ray School's second grade team is experimenting with vermi-composting (worms). 
The school is working on becoming the pilot school in a town-wide composting initiative. 

• Programs for kids at the Ray School include recycling, an annual spring "Walk to School 
Day", continued use of stainless flatware in the Ray Cafe lunch program rather than 
disposable plastic ware. 

• 12,000 plastic bags were saved by Hanover High School students who chose to use no bag 
or a re-usable bag when going to the Co-op in Hanover during the fall of 2009. 

• In keeping with The Natural Step philosophy regarding fairness and social equity, 
numerous entities collected food and clothing for The Haven and participated in successful 
fundraising and volunteer in support of Haiti's earthquake victims (Co-op, Ray School 
collected over $2600 for Haiti). 

• Dartmouth competes in Recyclemania 2010, an intercollegiate, international competition to 
promote recycling, composting, and waste minimization on college campuses. Dartmouth 
aims to increase its diversion rate from 27% to 40% by April 2010. 

• Dartmouth College & the Sierra Club organized the Annual "Sustainable Move-Out/Move- 
In Campaign". Currently in its fifth consecutive year, this student-run campaign netted over 
$9,000. The student environmental organizations use the proceeds to fund "green" projects 
on and off campus. 

• The Sustainable Living Center (SLC) is a student-initiated living and learning laboratory 

based on the three pillars of academics, community outreach, and residential experience. The 
SLC opened in September 2008 as an affinity house for 19 residents and other interested 
students, staff, faculty and community members to learn, practice, and teach a lifestyle of 
minimal environmental impact. 

• The Waste-reduction/Recycling Action Group is planning a community-wide yard sale for 
late summer 2010. 

• Localvore & Slow Food movements continue to grow. 

• Howe Library recycles books that are withdrawn from the collection, takes old printer 
cartridges to Town Hall for recycling, and staff brings home recyclables (bottles, cans, 
plastics) that the Town doesn't take. 

• Lou's Restaurant received a green certification from The Green Restaurant Association 
(dinegreen.com). 

• Dartmouth College has a full-time Sustainability Manager. 

Learning: 

• Natural Step training workshops for Town Manager, and Sustainable Hanover Committee, 
and directors of Town departments. 

117 



• Town-wide Sustainable Hanover Community Workshop (February 7, 2010). 

• Police Lt. Michael Evans attended national conference on the latest trends in fuel efficient 
vehicles for public safety uses in fall 2009 and Frank Austin, Fleet and Facilities Manager, 
attended a national conference on hybrid, fuel efficient and electric vehicle development for 
Public Works in 2008. 

• The seventh grade team at the Richmond School has adopted an integrated environmental 
curriculum with each discipline weaving environmental themes into its study; for example, 
the English teachers have worked with their students to research and write persuasive essays 
on a topic of sustainability. 

• Several committed students and staff joined the Vermont Carbon Rally competition and won 
first prize for schools, which came with a $5,000 aware to be applied to further Richmond 
Middle School sustainability efforts. 

• The Sierra Club, League of Women Voters, Sustainable Hanover Committees have joined to 
with others to offer free public film and lecture series; public fora and workshops; 
dissemination of energy saving and weatherization information; free distribution of compact 
fluorescent light bulbs; providing speakers for sustainability-related events; public advocacy 
on sustainability initiatives; working with the Sustainable Hanover, Sustainable Dartmouth, 
and Hanover High School Environmental Club initiatives. 

• The Hanover High School Environmental Club established a Reuse and Recycling Master 
List for items that are not collected in the curbside recycling program. 

• Compost Field Trip for town & school staff to Montpelier, VT Composting program. 

• The Public Communications & Media Action Group developed Prototype Web Site to inform 
and engage the community. 

• Vermont Earth Institute / Catamount Earth Institute Discussion Courses with several town 
organizations. 

• Dartmouth has hired Professor Anne Kapuscinski as the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished 
Professor of Sustainability Science. She is working with a collaborative team of faculty, 
students, and staff to develop a Sustainability Minor, graduate program, and expanded 
academic and research opportunities at the Dartmouth Organic Farm. 

• A series of classes in Environmental Studies and Engineering have focused on achieving 
carbon neutrality at Dartmouth College through energy efficiency, energy conservation, and 
renewable energy. 

• On February 10, 2010, the Dartmouth Sustainability Initiative, Tuck Sustains, and the Allwin 
Initiative at Tuck organized the first Dartmouth Sustainability Summit that brought together 
the undergraduate College and graduate schools to explore options for future collaboration in 
the pursuit of sustainability. 

• On April 16 th - 17 th , 2010, Dartmouth College will host a sustainable design symposium: 
Sustainable Design: from LEED to Living Buildings, Integrated Design/Integrated 
Development Conference (IDID VI). The symposium is sponsored by the Dartmouth College 
Sustainability Initiative and the Environmental Guild of the New Hampshire Chapter of the 
American Institute of Architects (AIA). 

• A number of Sustainability "Summits" and conferences occurred in 2009 and 2010 at 
Dartmouth and in Town. 

For a more in depth summary of actions, visit the Sustainable Hanover web site: 
http://www.sustainablehanovernh.org 

118 



Moving Forward Toward Sustainability: As the list above indicates, citizens in Hanover, NH 
have been working hard to ensure sustainable prosperity and well-being for the community. Our 
present challenge is to create a vision of a sustainable community that includes specific goals 
and a structure for measuring our success. As an outgrowth of our Community Sustainability 

Workshop in February 2009, the SHC has begun developing specific sustainability goals and 
indicators that will enable us to track our progress over time. We do not, for example, have a way to 
compile data about individual actions taken in individual households; we do not have a central 
location where individuals, businesses and other entities can go to measure progress. 

To this end, 2010 will be the year of goal-setting and strategic sustainability planning. Within the 
context of The 2003 Master Plan and the Natural Step framework, the SHC will engage the 
community in a conversation about sustainability indicators and actions we can all take to 
participate in the ongoing measurement of our collective challenges and successes. 

For example, how many gallons of fuel and kilowatts of energy do the 3,000 households in Hanover 
use? What actions are people taking to change their behavior in order to reduce their impact on the 
environment, while simultaneously contributing to the increased well-being of the community? 
How many households have solar hot water and/or solar electric? How many households have 
chosen to reduce the temperatures at which they heat their homes and by how much? How many 
tons of waste can we divert by composting more at our homes, businesses and organizations? These 
are the kinds of questions we are asking. Please join the conversation. 

Volunteers Needed: To get involved in and to support our work, please contact us at 
sustainablehanovernh(S)gmail.com . The SHC needs volunteers to participate in event planning 
(like The Naked Table Project and other educational events) and data gathering. We also invite you 
to attend the monthly meetings of the Sustainable Hanover Committee at Town Hall on the third 
Wednesday of each month (8 AM). 

Thank you. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Lyn Swett Miller & Larry Litten 
Co-chairs, Sustainable Hanover Committee 
March 1,2010 

Members of the Sustainable Hanover Committee: Chris Soderquist (Systems Consultant), Brian 
Walsh (Selectboard Liaison), Peter Kulbacki (Hanover Public Works), Marjorie Rogalski, Mary Ann 
Cadwallader, Chris Kennedy, Chris Hodgkin, Emily Neuman (Co-op Food Stores), Marissa S. 
Knodel (Dartmouth College) 



Zoning Board of Adjustment 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment held 12 Public Hearings, 12 deliberation sessions, and 1 public site 
visit in calendar year 2009. The Board considered 48 cases, with several of the cases being heard on 
more than one hearing night. Relaxed standards for the granting of variances, as dictated by the 



119 



New Hampshire Supreme Court, has added to the length and complexity of a number of Zoning 
Board hearings. 

While State Statute allows up to 10 Zoning Board members (5 full members and 5 alternate 
members), the Zoning Board began the year with 7 members and ended with 9. Sheila Buckley and 
Maureen Bolton were appointed to the Board in 2009. 

Prior to the night of the public hearing, sitting members review a packet of information on each case, 
allowing them to ask relevant questions during the hearing. Following the hearing, members 
individually visit the property site, review the submitted information and hearing testimony, and 
draft preliminary case decisions. At the public deliberation session, draft decisions are read aloud, 
specifics of the decision are discussed, sections are revised and reworked according to the members' 
discussions, and then a final decision vote is taken. 

The current full members of the Zoning Board of Adjustment are Arthur Gardiner, Chair; Bill 
Dietrich, Vice-Chair; Carolyn Radisch, Clerk; Gert Assmus, and Steve Marion. H. Bernard Waugh, 
Ruth Lappin, Sheila Buckley, and Maureen Bolton are Alternate Members. 

Generally, the Zoning Board of Adjustment holds public hearings on the fourth Thursday of the 
month, with a deliberation meeting scheduled for the following Thursday. Interested individuals 
should check the hearing and deliberation schedule, especially around the holidays, as meetings are 
apt to be rescheduled in order to accommodate the fullest compliment of members. All hearings and 
meetings of the Board begin at 7:00 PM, are held at Town Hall, and are open to the public. 



Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Activity in 2009 

Zoning Board of Adjustment Cases: 

Special Exceptions 32 

Variances 9 

Appeals of Administrative Decisions 1 

Building Code Appeals 

Rehearings 3 

Other _3 

Total 48 

Zoning and Use Permits: 

Residential 238 

Commercial 76 

Institutional 37 

Total 251 



120 



Outside Agency Reports 

CATV Executive Director's Report 

I guess one of the best compliments we had last year was from a Comcast technician who visits 
many public access stations. While doing work at our Tip Top Classroom, he noted how busy we 
were with producers editing and taping, etc. He stated that this is unusual because most access 
stations he visits are not very active. Free Speech is definitely working at CATV. Last year was a 
busy year as usual for CATV. During 2009 CATV agreed on a new Comcast contract which runs 
through 2014. We also hired a new employee Ella Farnsworth and moved into our new studio at the 
AVA Gallery. 

Last year we aired 17,712 programs which is 13,015 hours of programming. During 2009 we aired a 
total of 1,752 government meetings which was 552 hours of government programming. Last year we 
aired 9,906 local programming which is 3,016 hours of locally produced programs. (These are total 
repeated programs). We had a good breakdown of locally produced programs per town. The 
communities' breakdown is as follows: Hanover - 237, Hartford - 197, Lebanon - 137, Norwich - 27 
and Hartland - 9 (these do not include government meetings and these are first run programs) 
Government meetings first run programs are as follows: Dresden - 18, Hanover 
-42, Lebanon - 206, Hartford, 152, Norwich - 59 and Hartland - 56. (These figures are first run 
programs) 

In 2008 CATV was number one in the State of Vermont in hourly programs and in the middle in 
number of programs. CATV is also in the process of developing a new web-site. This content 
management system will allow viewers to communicate more with CATV and vice versa. Our new 
web-site will include our daily programming right on the front page, along with other vital 
information pertaining to CATV. 

As you can see by our staff reports how many producers and different programs that are being 
produced at CATV. CATV is developing new ways to communicate with our viewers with a new 
Video on Demand service that will show all CATV programming to our viewers with cable modem 
or DSL capabilities. 

CATV at the Tip Top and AVA Gallery are looking forward to a great year for 2010. CATV is 
blessed with great employees who work hard for our television viewers and the public as a whole. 
We also have many volunteers who work hard at both studios. I would like to personally thank Steve 
Giroux, BreAnna Kline, Luke Chrisinger and Ella Farnsworth for being great and hard working 
employees. These people make CATV go. 

As CATV moves into the new fiscal year we look to strengthen our relationships with our member 
towns. Our studio and both classrooms have continually been busy and moving forward with new 
technology and ideas. CATV continues to work with the Hartford Area Career and Technology 
Center in working with their students in video productions. 

As Executive Director I am pleased with the help of our Chair, Peter Glenshaw in his leadership and 
effort he is putting into CATV. I would also like to thank the whole board for their support for 
CATV and helping us move forward. 

— Bob Franzoni 

121 



Hanover Improvement Society 
Report to the Town of Hanover 2010 



The Hanover Improvement Society is an independent and not for profit organization founded in 
1922 for the purpose of beautifying Hanover with money generated from sources other than tax 
dollars. The Improvement Society owns and operates The Nugget Theater, The James Campion III 
Ice Rink and Storrs Pond. The Society members are committed to making Hanover a better place in 
which to live. We assist with the plantings of town gardens, the construction of town projects such as 
the Black Community Center, The Howe Library and the town parking garage. 

In addition to good works on specific community projects the operation of Storrs Pond as a 
community resource continues to be one of our most visible undertakings. We firmly believe that 
Storrs Pond is a vital community asset and should be available and affordable to the entire 
community. At the same time infrastructure and safety are not inexpensive. Today most profits 
garnered from our activities at the theater and rink are used immediately to operate the pond, leaving 
precious little if anything for other good works. We will continue and possibly expand our fund 
raising activities in support of this work and hope that you can join us in our efforts. 

We welcome your questions and your support of the Hanover Improvement Society. Please contact 
any of the members of the Society or stop in to our offices above the Nugget Theater and say hello. 
We would very much like to know what you think of our efforts. 

John A. Hochreiter 

President 

Hanover Improvement Society 



122 




Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee 

c/o "Upper Yalfeu Lakf Sunapee 'Rpaionat "Planning Commission 
30 'Bank-Street, Lebanon, "N74 oyjbb-ljjb 
60^-448-1680 www.uufiftw.orq 



w 3 



ANNUAL REPORT 2009 



During 2009 the Committee continued to maintain a regional website ( www.uvhhw.org ), hosted 
booths at the Upper Valley Home Life Exhibition and the Hanover Food Co-op, and provided 
volunteers for the household hazardous waste collections at the Lebanon Landfill. 

Home & Life Show Event Booth: The Household Hazardous Waste Committee's booth in March 
featured information on collections in the area including dates and what materials are and are not 
accepted. "Universal Waste" examples and management options were provided. These materials 
include rechargeable batteries, fluorescent light bulbs, auto batteries, antifreeze, and mercury- 
containing devices such as button batteries, thermostats, and thermometers. Pesticide free lawn and 
garden care continued to be a focus. Alternative cleaning recipes were distributed. A large map 
displayed the household hazardous waste collections in the area with their dates, times, and contacts 
for further information. 

Co-op Community Partner in March: The Committee displayed a tri-fold on HHW collections, 
what to bring, what is not acceptable, collection statistics, etc. Handouts were provided for non- 
toxic household cleaner recipes, informational sheets on batteries crop-off sites, dates and location of 
2009 HHW collections, and information on universal waste. 

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Support: The committee provided volunteer support at 
the collections held at the Lebanon Landfill, keeping waiting times short and residents informed. A 
total of 450 households from Cornish, Enfield, Hanover, Lebanon, Lempster, Lyme, Piermont, 
Plainfield, and Springfield brought waste to two collections at the Lebanon Landfill in July and 
October. 

Unwanted Medicine Collection Research: The Committee is working with Dartmouth Hitchcock 
Medical Center to provide Unwanted Medicine collections combined with the 2010 HHW 
collections. Training will be obtained from Sarah Silk at the Wolfeboro, NH facility to insure 
successful implementation of a complex service. 

The Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee is made up of volunteers from Upper 
Valley towns. We invite anyone interested to attend our meetings and become involved. 

Margaret Bragg, Hanover, NH 

Vickie Davis, Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning Commission 

Charlotte Faulkner, Hanover, NH 

Joyce Noll, Etna, NH 

Barbara Whitman, Chair, Lebanon, NH 

— <Rfduce the use of topes in uour home, and responsibly dispose of what waste uou do generate — 



123 



Notes... 



124 



Chapter 5 



Miscellaneous 
Information 



125 




The Senate of the State of New Hampshire 

107 N. Main Street, Room 302, Concord, N.H. 03301-4951 



MATTHEW S. HOUDE Office 271-2104 

District 5 TTY/TDD 

1-800-735-2964 



Legislative Update from Sen. Matthew Houde, District 5 - March 2010 

Let me start by saying "thank you". It is a privilege and honor to represent Hanover, which is part of Senate 
District 5, in the NH Senate. As you gather for town meeting, I wanted to share some of the rewards (and 
challenges) of the current session in Concord. 

2009 Highlights 

While much energy and attention was focused, appropriately, on the state budget last year, the Legislature 
also addressed bills involving same sex marriage (passed), mandatory seat belts (did not pass), and medical 
marijuana (passed but was vetoed). While the same sex marriage bill was an historic moment, the latter two 
issues seem to be re-visited every session - and last year was no exception. 

State Budget 

The economic climate continues to challenge state and local governments. At the same time the need for 
services increases (for example, more people across the state are in need of Medicaid and unemployment 
benefits), the state has not collected enough revenue to address these needs. As a result, the Legislature and 
Governor continue to look for ways to close the gap. Many drastic cuts to programs have been proposed, 
and the Legislature has heard bills proposing various solutions on the revenue side - including expanded 
gambling. Gambling remains a controversial issue, and the vast majority of people I heard from in Senate 
District 5 do not support it. I voted against the gambling bill, but it passed the Senate 14-10. Regardless of 
what the House does with the bill, cuts alone cannot close the gap without severely hurting those in need of 
services; it is likely that we will need to find additional revenue as well. I welcome your thoughts and 
suggestions regarding this ongoing issue... 

The fate of the LLC Tax 

Everyday the "LLC tax" (technically, the extension of the interest and dividends tax to LLC distributions) 
looks less and less likely to remain in effect. Several bills have been heard that would either repeal or 
essentially eliminate the tax. Additionally, the Governor has indicated that he will support repeal - provided 
it is done as part of a wider review of state business taxes and solutions to the state's revenue problems. (It 
was estimated that the LLC tax would generate $ 1 5 million/year.) 



126 



Health Care Legislation 

While the federal government has passed historic health care reform legislation, there is still much the state 
can do to address affordability and access. One bill that I sponsored, (SB 390) would provide employees of 
businesses that do not currently offer health care coverage a way to obtain it. Briefly, employees could 
choose from certain coverage options available through "cafeteria plans" set up by their employers. With 
cafeteria plans, employees pay for the coverage with pre-tax dollars (through payroll deductions) at a 
significantly reduced rate from the individual insurance market. The cost to the employer of setting up a 
plan is small; it ranges from $0 (if the employer sets it up him/herself) to $250 (if the employer hires an 
outside HR consultant to do so). Those costs - and more - would be recouped since the employer would be 
contributing less to federal employment taxes. This bill passed the Senate and now moves to the House. 

Another bill that I introduced (SB 510) would establish a study commission to look at the differences 
between coverage for oral cancer treatment as opposed to IV cancer treatment. Currently, most health care 
insurers cover oral cancer medication under a pharmacy benefit, which requires a co-pay with each refill. 
On the other hand, IV cancer treatment is covered as a medical benefit - so that the insured only pays a one- 
time co-pay and a fixed deductible. The concern is that this may discourage health care providers from 
prescribing oral medication - even if oral treatment could prove beneficial. There are several questions 
surrounding the issue that remain unanswered, however, so - assuming the bill passes the House - a 
committee will be formed to collect information, take testimony, and make any recommendations for future 
legislation. 

Hanover Water Works 

The Senate also passed a bill of particular local concern regarding the municipalization of Hanover Water 
Works, which passed your special session late last year. The bill was sponsored by all of your 
representatives and was necessary to facilitate the transaction. 

This has been a challenging session. The Legislature continues to address not only the issues discussed 
above, but also myriad other issues both large and small. All of your representatives welcome your input. 

Best wishes for a productive town meeting! 
Regards, 



Matthew Houde 

NH Senate - District 5 

matthew.houde(q)leg.state.nh.us 



127 




Raymond S. Burton 



338 River Road 

Bath, NH 03740 

Tel. (603) 747-3662 

Car Phone (603)481-0863 

E-mail: ray.burton4©gte.net 

Executive Councilor 
District One 



Report to the People of District One 
By: Executive Councilor Ray Burton 



2009 was indeed the year of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)/Stimulus 
Funds in New Hampshire! 




Towns in Council District #1 
CARROLL COUNTY: 

Albany, Bsmsii. 
Chatham, Conway. Eaton. 
Elttnghsm, Freedom, Hart's Lot. 
Jackson. Malison, Moullonborough, 
Osslpee, Sandwich. Temworth. 
Tultonboro. Wakeliold, WoUaOoro, 

GRAFTON COUNTY: 

Ale«andria, Ashland. Balh, 
Bamon, Bethlehem, Brrdgewater. 
Bristol, Campion, Canaan, 
Doioiesior, Easton, Ellsworth, 
Enlield, Franccnla. Giallon, 
Groicn. Hanover, Haverhill, 
Hebron, Holdemess. LandaH, 
Lebanon. Lincoln, Lisbon, 
Livermoie, Littleton, Lyman, 
Lyme, Monroe, Orange, Ortord 
Piermonl, Plymouth, Humney, 
Sugar Hill, Thornton, Warren. 
Waterviile Valley, Wentworth, 
Woodstock 

BELKNAP COUNTY: 

aiio". Belmont, Center Harbor, 
Giltord. Lsconla, Meiedith, 
New Hampton. Sanbornton. Titton 



As of November 4, 2009, $579,305,870.00 had been allocated in New Hampshire in nine 
areas: business/community; education; employment; energy; health; housing; safety; 
technology and transportation. Of that $181,463,876.00 went to Council District One towns 
and cities and the counties of Belknap, Carroll, Coos, Grafton and Sullivan. 

The ARRA money has enabled local, state and county government to work on projects that 
have been in process and planning for years. For a complete listing of these projects go 
to: www.ed.state.nh.us/education/recovery/index.htm or write to my office. 

Governor Lynch has now submitted the New Hampshire Transportation Plan to the New 
Hampshire House and Senate. Highways/bridges, rail, aviation and public projects are 
among the proposed recommendations. Contact your local State Senator and Legislator for 
details about what projects you believe to be key ones for your region. 

As Councilor, I do not see new revenues being raised in New Hampshire State Government. 
With the decline in existing revenues leading to cut backs in services, only time will 
determine what the law making branch has in mind for new dollars. Keep in close touch 
with your local State Senator and Legislator to make sure costs are NOT passed on to county 
and local government. 

The Governor and Council are required by law to fill dozens of boards and commissions with 
volunteers. If you are interested in serving, please send a letter of interest and your resume to 
Governor John Lynch, Attention: Jennifer Kuzma, Appointment Liaison, State House, 107 
North Main Street, Concord, NH 03301 For the current list of what possible appointments 
might be coming up go to: http://www.sos.nh.gov/redbook/index.htm . 

There is a constant flow of informational items available at my office: tourist maps, 
consumer handbooks and the New Hampshire Constitution. Each Monday I send, via e-mail, 
the schedule of my weekly meetings and other information. Send me your e-mail to be 
added to the list at rburton@nh.gov or find the schedule on my State House web page at: 
http : //www.nh. gov/council/district 1 /schedules . 

Contact my office anytime I can be of help. 



COOS COUNTY: 

Berlin, Canal), Clerktville, 
Colebrook, Columbia. Ooilon. 
Dtxviflo, Dummer, Errot, 
Gotham, Jelferjon, Lancaster , 
Milan. Miueijoid. Northumberland, 
Pittsburg, Randolph, Shelbume, 
Stewartstown. Stark. Stratford. 
White! iald 



SULLIVAN COUNTY: 

Charlestown, Ciaromont, Cornish. 
Croydon, Grantham, Newport 
PlamliokJ. Springllsld. Sunapeo 




128 



2009 Summary of Legal Activity 





Plaintiff 


Defendant 


Town Legal 




Case/Type 


Attornev 


Attornev 


Expenses 


Outcome 


Telecommunication 




Robert Ciandella 


$ 


576 


Ongoing Legal Research 


- West Central NH Regional Health 










& Security Communication Consortium 


Robert Ciandella 


$ 


2,950 


Ongoing Legal Research 


- SegTEL, Inc. 


Caroline Cole 


Robert Ciandella 


$ 


143,499 


Settled 


- PUC Utility 




Robert Ciandella 


$ 


3,392 


Ongoing 


Pole Docket 












Salvatoriello -Avellino 


Sean Gorman 


Laura Spector 


$ 


1,433 


Resolved 


Health Violation 












Glynn 


John Glynn 


Walter Mitchell 


$ 


726 


Withdrawn 


ZBA Appeal 












Paragon 


Barry Schuster/ 


Laura Spector 


$ 


919 


Pending 


ZBA Appeal 


Robert Miller 










Patton 


James Mulligan 


Laura Spector 


$ 


1,068 


Pending 


Zoning Violation 












Municipalization of 




McLane, Graf 


$ 


31,882 


Ongoing legal 


Hanover Water Works Co. 










General Legal Advice 












Municipal Law 


- 


Walter Mitchell 


$ 


18,187 




Civil & Employment Law 


Mark Broth 




16,829 






- 


Charles Bauer/ 












Daniel Mullen 


$ 


2,023 






Total General Legal Advice 


$ 


37,039 








Total 


$_ 


223.484 





129 



Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Fire 


Fire Safety Crowd Control 


Cost +35% 


Cost +35% 


Cost +35% 


Cost +35% 


Fire 


Private Fire Hydrants - Fees 
Ultimately Governed by Most 
Current Hanover Water Works 
Company NH PUC Order 


$l,364.37/yr 


$ 1,621. 09/yr 


$l,685.33/yr 


$l,685.33/yr 


Fire 


Annual Monitoring Fee - 
Master Fire Box 


$300.00 


$300.00 


$300.00 


$300.00 


Fire 


False Alarm Charge - Fire 
Service 


$100.00 


if: Free 

2^: $100.00 

3 rd : $200.00 

4 th and 

bevond: $300 

per response 


If: Free 

2^: $100.00 

3 rd : $200.00 

4 th and 

beyond: $300 

per response 


If: Free 

2^: $100.00 

3^: $200.00 

4 th and bevond: 

$300 per 

response 


Fire 


Rescheduling of Fire Alarms 
or Sprinkler Acceptance Test 
because of contractor/owner 
not ready for test 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


Fire 


Building Permits: Stand- 
Alone Gas Installation and/or 
Replacement 


$55.00 


$55.00 


$55.00 


$55.00 


Fire 


Building Permits: Additional 
Appliances (Gas) beyond 
Original Permit 


n/a 


n/a 


$15.00/per 
appliance 


$15.00/per 
appliance 


Fire 


Building Permits: Stand- 
Alone Oil Installation and/or 
Replacement 


$55.00 


$55.00 


$55.00 


$55.00 


Fire 


Building Permits: Additional 
Appliances (Oil) beyond 
Original Permit 


n/a 


n/a 


$15.00/per 
appliance 


$15.00/per 
appliance 


Fire 


Re-inspection Fee - Gas or Oil 


n/a 


n/a 


$50.00 


$100.00 


Fire 


Projects Requiring Outside 
Consulting Assistance (where 
outside consulting services for 
plan review, testing or 
inspection are required) 


Full cost 

+10% 

admin 

charge 


Full cost 

+10% 

admin 

charge 


Full cost 

+ 10% 

admin 

charge 


Full cost 

+10% admin 

charge 


Ambulance 


Per Capita - Hanover 


$18.58 


$20.19 


$21.50 


$22.31 


Ambulance 


Per Capita - Lyme 


$18.58 


$20.19 


$21.50 


$22.31 


Ambulance 


Per Capita - Norwich 


$18.58 


$20.19 


$21.50 


$22.31 


Ambulance 


Community Contributions 
Adjustment to Cover Insurance 
Contractual Obligations for 
Ambulance Calls Originating 
in Community 


Pro-Rated 

Share of 

Lost 

Revenues 


Pro-Rated 

Share of 

Lost 

Revenues 


Pro-Rated 

Share of 

Lost 

Revenues 


Pro-Rated 

Share of Lost 

Revenues 



130 





Town of Hanover 


- Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 




Deot/Board 


Type of Fee- 


Adopted 
I \ 2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 

FY2009-10 




Ambulance 


Report Copies for Reports 1 -4 
Pages 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Ambulance 


Report Copies for Reports over 
4 Pages 


$10.00 

+$.50/page 

over 4 pages 


$10.00 

+$.50/page 

over 4 pages 


$10.00 

+$.50/page 

over 4 pages 


$10.00 

+$.50/page 

over 4 pages 


Ambulance 


Treatment with Transport - 
Basic Life Support - (plus 
mileage) 


$300.00 


$375.00 


$375.00 


$400.00 


Ambulance 


Treatment with Transport - 
Advanced Life Support Level 
1 - (plus mileage) 


$350.00 


$475.00 


$475.00 


$475.00 


Ambulance 


Treatment with Transport - 
Advanced Life Support Level 
2 - (plus mileage) 


$500.00 


$650.00 


$650.00 


$675.00 


Ambulance 


Treatment with Transport - 
Special Care Transport 


$575.00 


$700.00 


$700.00 


$775.00 


Ambulance 


Mileage Rate 


$9.00/mile 


$11.00/mile 


$11.00/mile 


Sll.OO/mile 


Ambulance 


Treatment/No Transport - 
Advanced Life Support 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Ambulance 


Additional Treatment Charges 
(with or without Advanced 
Life Support Transport) - 
Oxygen Charge 


$45.00 


$45.00 


$45.00 


$45.00 


Ambulance 


Additional Treatment Charges 
(with or without Advanced 
Life Support Transport) - 
Defibrillation 


$70.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Ambulance 


Additional Treatment Charges 
(with or without Advanced 
Life Support Transport) - 
Esophageal Obturator Airway 


$70.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


Ambulance 


Additional Treatment Charges 
(with or without Advanced 
Life Support Transport) - 
Endotracheal Tube 
Administration 


$70.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


Ambulance 


Additional Treatment Charges 
(with or without Advanced 
Life Support Transport) - 
Cardiac Monitoring 


$90.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Ambulance 


Additional Treatment Charges 
(with or without Advanced 
Life Support Transport) - 
IV/Drug Administration 


$75.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 



131 



Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Ambulance 


Additional Treatment Charges 
(with or without Advanced 
Life Support Transport) - 
Medications 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Ambulance 


Emergency Services 
Paramedic Intercept Charge 


n/a 


$125.00 


$125.00 


$200.00 


Ambulance 


Special Event Standby 


$100.00/hr 


$150.00/hour 


$150.00/hour 


$150.00/hour 


General 
Administration 


Processing Fee for Returned 
Deposit Item (NSF Checks or 
Checks Drawn on Closed 
Accounts) 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


General 
Administration 


Late Fee on Unpaid General 
Service Invoices (billed 
through the Town's 
Accounting Office) Balances 
over 45 Days Old 


12.00% per 
annum 
interest 


12.00% per 
annum 
interest 


12.00% per 
annum 
interest 


12.00% per 
annum 
interest 


General 
Administration 


Photocopying - single page 
(8.5" x 11.0") 


$.25/page 


$.25/page 


$.25/page 


$.25/page 


General 
Administration 


Photocopying - single page 
(8.5" x 14.0") 


$.50/page 


$.50/page 


$.50/page 


$.50/page 


General 
Administration 


Photocopying - single page 
(1 1.0" x 17.0") 


$.75/page 


$.75/page 


$.75/page 


$.75/page 


General 
Administration 


Copies of Appraisal Card for 
Property Owner 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


General 
Administration 


Copies of Appraisal Card for 
Requesters Other than Property 
Owner 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


General 
Administration 


Copies of Warranty Deed 


$2.00 


$2.00 


$1.00/page 


$1.00/page 


General 
Administration 


Copies of Tax Map 


$2.00 


$2.00 


$2.00 


$2.00 


General 
Administration 


Copies of Tax Bills for 
Property Owner 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


General 
Administration 


Copies of Tax Bills for 
Requesters Other than Property 
Owner 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


General 
Administration 


Electronic Files from Town 
Databases - on diskette or e- 
mailed (no data filtering a/o 
manipulation) 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


General 
Administration 


Customized Reports from 
Town Databases (e.g., 
Assessment and Town Clerk 
Databases) 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$50.00 






132 









Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 









Adopted by th( 


■ Board of Selectmen: June 22, 20()<> 




Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 

FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 




General 
Administration 


Valuation Listing (Hardcopy) 
from Assessment Database 
(Hardcopy) 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


General 
Administration 


Mailing Labels from Town 
Databases 


$.35/page 


$.35/page 


$.35/page 


$.35/page 


General 
Administration 


Hanover Code of Ordinances 
and Regulations 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


General 
Administration 


Hanover Master Plan - 2003 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


General 
Administration 


Master Plan Land Use Concept 
Map 


$2.00 


$3.00 


$3.00 


$3.00 


General 
Administration 


Zoning Ordinance plus Map 


$7.00 


$8.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


General 
Administration 


Zoning Map 


$3.00 


$3.00 


$3.00 


$3.00 


General 
Administration 


Subdivision Regulations 


$3.00 


$4.00 


$4.00 


$4.00 


General 
Administration 


Copies of Recorded Tapes 


n/a 


$5.00 each 


$5.00 each 


$5.00 each 


General 
Administration 


Site Plan Regulations 


$3.00 


$3.00 


$4.00 


$4.00 


General 
Administration 


Building Code Ordinance 


$3.00 


$3.00 


$3.00 


$3.00 


General 
Administration 


Open Space, Water Resources, 
and Other One-Sided Color 
Maps 


$.50 


$.50 


$1.00 


$1.00 


General 
Administration 


Trail Maps - Selected 
Individual Trails 


$1.00/each 


$1.00/each 


$1.00/each 


$1.00/each 


General 
Administration 


Trail Maps - Combined Area 
Trails 


$4.00/each 


$4.00/each 


$4.00/each 


$4.00/each 


General 
Administration 


Notary Public Services - per 
signature - Non-Residents 


$5.00 


$5.00 


$5.00 


$5.00 


General 
Administration 


Notary Public Services - per 
signature for Hanover 
Residents 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


No charge 


General 
Administration 


Vendor Permit - Daily 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


General 
Administration 


Vendor Permit for 9 Months 
beginning March 1 and ending 
November 30 


$1,200.00 


$1,200.00 


$1,200.00 


$1,200.00 


General 
Administration 


Pole License 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


General 
Administration 


Articles of Agreement 


$5.00 


$5.00 


$5.00 


$5.00 


General 
Administration 


Vital Statistics (e.g., Certified 
Copy of Birth Certificate) 


$12.00 


$12.00 


$12.00 


$12.00 



133 



Town of Hanover 



Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


General 
Administration 


Lamination of Vital Statistics 
Records 


$.50/certificate 


Sl.OO/certificate 


Sl.OO/certificate 


$1.00/certificate 


Highway 


Driveway Permits 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$75.00 


Highway 


Private Construction - Class VI 
Highway Permit 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Highway 


Excavation Permits 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$75.00 


Howe Library 


Overdue Materials Fine (with 
exceptions below)- before 2 nd 
Notice 


$.10/day 


$.10/day 


$.10/day 


$.10/day 


Howe Library 


Overdue Fine for videos, 
DVDs, CD-ROMs, art prints 
and reference books 


$1.00/day 


$1.00/day 


$1.00/day 


$1.00/day 


Howe Library 


Interlibrary Loan Fee - all fee 
payers per transaction 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Howe Library 


Museum Pass Non-Pickup Fee 


n/a 


n/a 


$5.00 


$5.00 


Howe Library 


Museum Pass Overdue Return 

Fee 


n/a 


n/a 


$5.00/day 


$5.00/day 


Howe Library 


Amazon Kindle (electronic 
book display) Overdue Fee 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


$1.00/day 


Howe Library 
and Etna Town 
Library 


Non- Resident Family - 1 2 
Month Membership 


$100.00 


$110.00 


$115.00 


$120.00 


Howe Library 
and Etna Town 
Library 


Non- Resident Family - 3 
Month Membership 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Howe Library 
and Etna Town 
Library 


Non- Resident Senior Citizen - 
12 Month Membership (65+) 


$75.00 


$80.00 


$80.00 


$80.00 


Howe Library 
and Etna Town 
Library 


Dresden Student Card; 
(Dresden Tuition Students - 
paid for by SAU, not by 
student) 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


Howe Library 
and Etna Town 
Library 


Dresden Employee Card 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


No charge 


Howe Library 
and Etna Town 
Library 


Resident Childcare Providers - 
A proportion of the Non- 
Resident Family 1 2-Month 
Membership fee of $1 15.00 
based on percentage of non- 
resident children whose 
families do not have Howe 
Library non-resident 
memberships; borrowing limits 
apply 


varies 


varies 


varies 


varies 



134 



Town of Hanover 



Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dcpt/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 


Adopted 


Adopted 


Adopted 








FY2006-07 


FY2007-08 


FY2008-09 


FY2009-1I) 




Howe Library 


Non-Resident Childcare 










and Etna Town 


Providers; borrowing limits 










Library 


apply 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$115.00 


$120.00 


Planning and 


Combined Application for Building and Zoning 


Permits: Fee 


as appropriate 


rom below 


Zoning 


plus $25.00: 












Minimum Permit Fee: 












Residential: 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Commercial, Institutional, 
Multi-Family, and Other 
Non-Single-and- Two- 
Family- Residential 
Construction, Additions, 
Renovations, Alterations: 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Planning and 


Single- and Two-Family 


$25.00 plus 


$25.00 plus 


$25.00 plus 


$25.00 plus 


Zoning 


Houses 


$0.50/sq.ft. 


$0.50/sq.ft. 


$0.50/sq.ft. 


$0.50/sq.ft. 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Residential Renovations 


$0.25/sq.ft. 


$0.25/sq.ft. 


$0.25/sq.ft. 


$0.25/sq.ft. 




Non-Habitable Structures 












Accessory to One- and Two- 












Family Residential: Porch, 












garage, shed, fence, pool, 










Planning and 


temporary trailer, retaining 










Zoning 


wall, and similar 


$0.25/sq.ft. 


$0.25/sq.ft. 


$0.25/sq.ft. 


$0.25/sq.ft. 




Commercial, Institutional, 












Multi-Family, and Other Non- 












Single-and-Two-Family- 












Residential Construction, 












Additions, Renovations, 












Alterations: 


$50.00 plus: 


$50.00 plus: 


$50.00 plus: 


$50.00 plus: 




for Portion of Construction 


$5.50 per 


$5.50 per 


$5.50 per 


$5.50 per 




Cost up to $10,000,000 


$1,000 of 


$1,000 of 


$1,000 of 


$1,000 of 


Planning and 




Construction 


Construction 


Construction 


Construction 


Zoning 


for Portion of Construction 


Cost 


Cost 


Cost 


Cost 




Cost between $10,000,001 and 


$4.15per 


$4.15per 


$4.15per 


$4.15per 




$20,000,000 


$1,000 of 


$1,000 of 


$1,000 of 


$1,000 of 






Construction 


Construction 


Construction 


Construction 






Cost 


Cost 


Cost 


Cost 




for Portion of Construction 
Cost Exceeding $20,000,000 


$1.85 per 
$1,000 of 


$1.85 per 
$1,000 of 


$1.85 per 
$1,000 of 


$1.85 per 
$1,000 of 






Construction 


Construction 


Construction 


Construction 






Cost 


Cost 


Cost 


Cost 



135 



Town of Hanover 



Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 

FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Sign, Awning, or Canopy 


$30.00 


$25.00, plus 
$30.00 for 

electrical or 
foundation 


$25.00, plus 
$30.00 for 

electrical or 
foundation 


$25.00, plus 
$30.00 for 

electrical or 
foundation 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Moving or Demolition 


$50.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Building & Zoning Permits: 
Revision Plan Review and 
Partial Submissions 


5% 

surcharge 

for each 

occurrence 


$50.00 per 

hour of 

review time 


$50.00 per 

hour of 

review time 


$50.00 per 

hour of 

review time 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Projects Requiring Outside 

Consulting Assistance (where 
outside consulting services for 
plan review, testing or 
inspection are required) 




The Town of Hanover has 60 days to review 
complete applications. In the event an 
applicant wants expedited review, or the 
Building Inspector deems the scope and 
complexity of the project to warrant outside 
review, the applicant shall, in addition to 
fees specified herein, pay costs of review by 
a third-party consultant selected by the 
Town. 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Duplicate Inspections Log 


n/a 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Zoning Permit (not part of 
Combined Application) 


n/a 


$25.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Building Permits: Blanket 
Permit per Project (Sec. IX of 
Building Code Adoption 
Ordinance) 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Building Permits: Permit 
Extension 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a to $50.00 


n/a to $50.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Building Permits: Re- 
Inspection 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Building Permits: 
Additional Inspections 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Zoning Board of Adjustment: 
Special Exception 


$150.00 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Zoning Board of Adjustment: 
Variance 


$150.00 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 






136 









Town of Hanover 



Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by (he Board of Selectmen: June 22. 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
I \ 2009-10 




Planning and 
Zoning 


Zoning; Board of Adjustment: 
Appeal of Administrative 
Decision 


$150.00 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Zoning Board of Adjustment: 
Equitable Waiver 


$150.00 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Zoning Board of Adjustment: 
Hearing Under RSA 674:41 


$150.00 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$150.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Zoning Board of Adjustment: 
Rehearing (to be Refunded if 
Relief Granted) 


$50.00 


$50.00, plus 

actual costs 

of notifying 

abutters 


$50.00, plus 

actual costs 

of notifying 

abutters 


$50.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Planning Board: 
Subdivisions, All Types, 
payable at time of design 
review application 


$200 base fee 

plus $100 per 

lot, plat, site, 

or other 

division of 

land including 

units per RSA 

672:14 


$200 base fee 

plus $100 per 

lot, plat, site, 

or other 

division of 

land including 

units per RSA 

672:14, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$200 base fee 

plus $100 per 

lot, plat, site, 

or other 

division of 

land including 

units per RSA 

672:14, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$200 base fee 

plus $100 per 

lot, plat, site, or 

other division 

of land 

including units 

per RSA 

672:14, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 



137 



Town of Hanover 



Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 




Planning Board: 












Site Plan Review Base Fee 

Plus additional cumulative as 
follows, based on Estimated 
Full Cost of Construction 
(ECC), as verified by the 
Building Inspector: 


$500.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters, 

plus: 


$500.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters, 

plus: 


$500.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters, 

plus: 


$500.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters, plus: 




$0 to $2,500,000 ECC 


$5.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$5.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$5.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$5.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 

$4.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


Planning and 
Zoning 


$2,500,001 to $5,000,000 ECC 


$4.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$4.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$4.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 




$5,000,001 to $10,000,000 
ECC 


$3.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$3.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$3.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$3.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 




$10,000,001 to $15,000,000 
ECC 


$2.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$2.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$2.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$2.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 




$15,000,001 to $20,000,000 
ECC 


$1.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$1.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$1.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$1.00 per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 




Over $20,000,000 ECC 


$-0- per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$-0- per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$-0- per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


$-0- per 

$10,000 of 

ECC 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Town Staff Technical Review 
of Subdivision and Site Plan 
Drawings - Revised Plan Fee 


$100/sheet 

for review 

of revised 

drawings 


$100/sheet 

for review 

of revised 

drawings 


$100/sheet 

for review 

of revised 

drawings 


$100/sheetfor 

review of 

revised 

drawings 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Modification to Any of the 
Above 


$200.00 


$200.00 


$200.00 


$200.00 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Planning Board: 

Minor Lot Line Adjustment 


$100.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$100.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$100.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$100.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 



138 



Town of Hanover - Rate and 



Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 

FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 




Planning and 
Zoning 


Planning Board: 
Boundary Agreement 


$100.00 


$100.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$100.00, 

plus actual 

costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


$100.00, plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


Planning and 
Zoning 


Wetlands Administrative 
Permit 


$25.00 


$50.00 plus 

actual costs 

of notifying 

abutters 


$50.00 plus 

actual costs 

of notifying 

abutters 


$50.00 plus 

actual costs of 

notifying 

abutters 


Police 


Pistol Permits (4 year Permit) 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Police 


Special Services Detail - 
Police Personnel 


$49.00/hour 

($36.30/hr 

for officer + 

35% admin. 

chg.) 


$50.29/hour 

($37.25/hr 

for officer + 

35% admin. 

chg.); plus 

signage and 

barricade 

rental, if 

required 

Note: 
Certain Non- 
Profits may 
qualify for 
reduction in 
the admin. 
chg. from 
35% to 14% 


$51.80 

($38.37/hr 

for officer + 

35% admin. 

chg.); plus 

signage and 

barricade 

rental, if 

required 

Note: 
Certain Non- 
Profits may 
qualify for 
reduction in 
the admin, 
chg. from 
35% to 14% 


$54.58 

($38.75/hr for 

officer + 

5.85% State 

Share of 

Retirement 

Contribution 

+ 35%o admin. 

chg.); plus 

signage and 

barricade 

rental, if 

required 

Note: Certain 

Non-Profits 

may qualify 

for reduction 

in the admin. 

chg. from 

35% to 14% 


Police 


Reports (Flat Fee) 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


Police 


Fingerprints (Non-Resident) 


$15.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 for 

first 2 cards 

and $5.00 

for each 

additional 

card 


$20.00 for 

first 2 cards 

and $5.00 for 

each 

additional 

card 


Police 


Photos on CD or Diskette 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Police 


DVD of Cruiser Video used 
for Discovery 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


$25.00 


Police 


Alcohol Diversion: Ages 12-15 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


Police 


Alcohol Diversion: Ages 16-20 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


Police 


Marijuana Diversion - under 
17 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 



139 





Town of Hanover 


- Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 


Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 

FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Police 


Penalty to Reschedule 2 nd 
Diversion Counseling Session 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


Police 


Alarm Connection Fee - One- 
Time Charge 


$50.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


Police 


Annual Monitoring Fee 


$325.00 
within 
Town; 

$425.00 
out-of- 
Town 


$325.00 
within 
Town; 

$425.00 
out-of- 
Town 


$325.00 
within 
Town; 

$425.00 
out-of- 
Town 


$325.00 
within Town; 

$425.00 
out-of-Town 


Police 


Pro-Rated Monthly Monitoring 
Fee 


$33.00/mo 


$33.00/mo 


$33.00/mo 


$33.00/mo 


Police 


Police Service - Residential 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Police 


Police Service - Commercial 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Police 


Penalty Charge for Inaccurate 
Call List 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Police 


Dog License - Neutered Male 
and Female; and Puppies 
Under 7 Mos. 


$6.50 


$6.50 


$6.50 


$6.50 


Police 


Doe License - Unneutered 
Male and Female 


$9.00 


$9.00 


$9.00 


$9.00 


Police 


Doe License - First Doe _ Sr. 
Citizen Owner 


$2.00 


$2.00 


$2.00 


$2.00 


Police 


Doe License - Late Fee per 
Month after May 3 1 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


Police 


Doe License - Group License 
for 5 or more Dogs 


$20.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


Police 


Nuisance Dog Fine 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


Police 


Menace Dog Fine 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Police 


Vicious Dog Fine 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Police 


Unlicensed Dog Fine 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


Parking 


Lot Rentals - Peripheral Space 
Monthly Rentals 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 


Parking 


Lot Rentals - CBD 
(Commercial Business 
District) Space Monthly 
Rentals 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


Parking 


Lot Rentals (Lease w/6 mo. 
Commitment) - Facility Space 
Monthly Rentals Level 2 


$140.00 


$140.00 


$140.00 


$140.00 


Parking 


Lot Rentals (Lease w/6 mo. 
Commitment) - Facility Space 
Monthly Rentals Level 3 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Parking 


Lot Rentals (Lease w/6 mo. 
Commitment) - Facilitv Space 
Monthly Rentals Level 4 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 



140 





Town of Hanover 


- Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board 


' Selectmen: June 22 


2009 




Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY 2009- 10 




Parking 


Lot Rentals - Monthly Facility 
Pass 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


Parking 


Lot Rentals - ZBA (Zoning 
Board of Adjustment) 
Required Monthly Lot Rentals 


$75/space 


$75/space 


$75/space 


$75/space 


Parking 


Temporary Parking Permits 


$7.50/day 


$7.50/day 


$7.50/day 


$7.50/day 


Parking 


30 Consecutive Day Parking 
Permit - Hovey Lane and 
lower Lebanon Street 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 


Parking 


Annual Parking Permits - 
Replacement of Misplaced 
Permits 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Parking 


Annual Parking Permits - Fee 
for Lost or Unreturned Parking 
Permits 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 




Town Parking Garage Rates - 
increases every ac 


Please Note: Total parking facility charge 
ditional 10-15 minutes stay between hours. 






Hourly 
Rate 


Total 

$ 


Hourly 
Rate 


Total 

$ 


Hourly 
Rate 


Total 

$ 


Hourly 
Rate 


Total 

$ 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 1 st Half Hour 


Free 


$-0- 


Free 


$-0- 


Free 


$-0- 


Free 


S-0- 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 2 nd Half Hour 


$.50 


$.50 


$.50 


$.50 


$.50 


$.50 


$.50 


$.50 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 2 nd Hour 


$.75 


$1.25 


$.75 


$1.25 


$.75 


$1.25 


$.75 


$1.25 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 3 rd Hour 


$1.00 


$2.25 


$1.00 


$2.25 


$1.00 


$2.25 


$1.00 


$2.25 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 4 th Hour 


$2.00 


$4.25 


$2.00 


$4.25 


$2.00 


$4.25 


$2.00 


$4.25 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 5 th Hour 


$2.50 


$6.75 


$2.50 


$6.75 


$2.50 


$6.75 


$2.50 


$6.75 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 6 th Hour 


$2.50 


$9.25 


$2.50 


$9.25 


$2.50 


$9.25 


$2.50 


$9.25 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 7 th Hour 


$3.75 


$13.00 


$3.75 


$13.00 


$3.75 


$13.00 


$3.75 


$13.00 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - 8 th Hour and 
Over 


$2.00 


$15.00 


$2.00 


$15.00 


$2.00 


$15.00 


$2.00 


$15.00 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - Parking between 
6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. Flat 
Rate Monday thru Friday 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


$1.00 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - Short 
Term Rates - Saturdays Only 
Park Less than 3 Hours 


No Charge 


No Charge 


No Charge 


No Charge 



141 



Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - 
Validation Stickers 
One Hour @ $0.50 each 
(minimum purchase 96) 


$48.00 


$48.00 


$48.00 


$48.00 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - 
Validation Stickers 
One Hour Bulk @ $0.35 each 
(minimum purchase 984) 


$344.40 


$344.40 


$344.40 


$344.40 


Parking 


Town Parking Garage - 
Validation Stickers 
All-Day @ $15.00 each 
(minimum purchase 1 0) 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Expired 
Meter 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$20.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Overtime 
Violation (2 Hr. Zone) 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Overtime 
Meter Feeding 


$20.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


$20.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$40.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - 2 nd Meter 
Ticket This Date 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$40.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - 3 rd Meter 
Ticket This Date 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Towing 
Charge (Winter Parking 
Ban) 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 






142 









Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 









Adopted by tin 


Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 




Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 




Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$110.00 


$110.00 


$110.00 


$110.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - 
Handicapped Space 


$250.00 


$250.00 


$250.00 


$500.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$1,000.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$510.00 


$510.00 


$510.00 


$1,000.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - No 
Parking 12:01 a.m. -7:00 
a.m.; 2:00 a.m. - 6:00 a.m. 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Parking in 
Prohibited Zone 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Parking in 
Prohibited Zone *Enhanced 
Fine* 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$40.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$80.00 


$80.00 


$80.00 


$80.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$90.00 


$90.00 


$90.00 


$90.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - No Town 
Permit 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Left 
Wheels to Curb 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - 
Loading/Bus Zone 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


$75.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$150.00 



143 



Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 



Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 

FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$160.00 


$160.00 


$160.00 


$160.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Improper 
Parking 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Parkins on 
Sidewalk 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Parking in 
Restricted Area 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


$30.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
14 Days 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parking 


Meter Violations - Fine After 
28 Days 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


Parking 


Summons Surcharge (Certified 
Mailer plus Postage) 


$5.00 


$5.00 


$5.00 


n/a 


Parking 


Boot Removal Fee 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Public Grounds 


Cemetery Lots - Hanover 
Residents 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


Public Grounds 


Cemetery Lots - Non- 
Residents 


$500.00 


$2,000.00 


$2,000.00 


$2,000.00 


Public Grounds 


Interment 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


$600.00 


Public Grounds 


Cremation Interment 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$100.00 


Public Grounds 


Gravestone Foundation 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


$500.00 


Public Grounds 


Project Inspection 


$75.00/hr 


$75.00/hr 


$75.00/hr 


$75.00/hr 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Resident 
Fees - Baseball, Softball, 
Soccer, Basketball, Field 
Hockey, Volleyball, Track 
(Grades 7/8: Norwich 
participant pays Resident Fee; 
Norwich Parks & Recreation 
Department helps underwrite 
this fee for Norwich 
participants) 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$40.00 


$50.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Non- 
Resident Fees - Baseball. 
Softball, Soccer, Basketball, 
Field Hockey, Volleyball, 
Track 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$60.00 



144 



Town of Hanover 



Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22. 2009 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs All 
Basketball Participants - 
Facilities Usage Fee Made 
Payable to SAU #70 


n/a 


n/a 


$35.00 


$40.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Resident 
Fees - Girls Lacrosse 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs N on- 
Resident Fees - Girls Lacrosse 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Resident 
Fees - Boys Lacrosse 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$65.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs N on- 
Resident Fees - Boys Lacrosse 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$75.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Resident 
Fees - Football 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$60.00 


$65.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Non- 
Resident Fees - Football 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$70.00 


$75.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs- Adult 
Softball Team Entry Fee 


$22.00/game 


$22.00/game 


$22.00/game 


$22.00/game 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Resident 
Fees - Adult Softball 


$8.00/player 


$8.00/player 


$8.00/player 


$8.00/player 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Programs Non- 
Resident Fees - Adult Softball 


S16.00/player 


$16.00/player 


$16.00/player 


$16.00/player 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Late Registration Fee for 
Registrations Received after 
Deadline 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$15.00 


$20.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Instructional Athletic 
Programs Resident Fees 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$25.00 


$30.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Instructional Athletic 
Programs Non-Resident Fees 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$35.00 


$40.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Dragonfly Summer Day Camp 

(Full Session of 6 wks) 

Resident Fees 

Per Morning or Afternoon 

Session 


$150.00 


$150.00 


$175.00 


$175.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Dragonfly Summer Day Camp 
(Full Session of 6 wks) Non- 
Resident Fees Per Morning or 
Afternoon Session 


$300.00 


$300.00 


$350.00 


$350.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Dragonfly Summer Day Camp 

(Session of 1 wk) Resident 

Fees 

Full Days Only 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


$85.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Dragonfly Summer Day Camp 
(Session of 1 wk) Non- 
Resident Fees 
Full Days Only 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


$170.00 






145 









Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 



Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 



Deot/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 

FY2009-10 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Dragonfly Summer Day Camp 
(Daily Rate) Resident Fees 
Full Days Only 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


$20.00/day 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Dragonfly Summer Day Camp 

(Daily Rate) Non-Resident 

Fees 

Full Days Only 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


$40.00/day 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Circle H Camp for Rising 
Kindergartners (5 days/week 
for 6 wks) - Residents Only 


$100.00 


$100.00 


$125.00 


$125.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Mini-Camps - Resident Fees 


$20.00/day 


$20.00/day 


$30.00/day 


$30.00/day 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Mini-Camps - Non-Resident 
Fees 


$35.00/day 


$35.00/day 


$40.00/day 


$40.00/day 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Tween Camp -Resident Fees 






$70.00/wk 


$70.00/wk 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Tween Camp - Non-Resident 
Fees 






$140.00/wk 


$140.00/wk 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Camp Quest -Resident Fees 






$50.00/day or 
$200.00/wk 


$50.00/dayor 
$200.00/wk 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Camp Quest - Non-Resident 
Fees 






$60.00/day or 
$240.00/wk 


$60.00/day or 
$240.00/wk 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Adult and Youth Instructional Programs - Fees Determined 
Based on Instructors' Costs and Administrative and 
Materials Costs; Program Revenue is split 70/30 between the 
Instructor and the Recreation Department; Instructor may 
keep 70% of total income earned up to a maximum of 
$75.00/hour after expenses. 


varies 


varies 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Athletic Field Rental 


Up to 

$100.00 per 

field per day 


Up to 

$100.00 per 

field per day 


Up to 

$100.00 per 

field per day 


Up to $100.00 

per field per 

day 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Rental of Equipment 


Up to 

$25.00 for 

use of 

Recreational 

Equipment 


Up to 

$25.00 for 

use of 

Recreational 

Equipment 


Up to 

$25.00 for 

use of 

Recreational 

Equipment 


Up to $25.00 

for use of 

Recreational 

Equipment 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Basketball Tournament Fees 


$30.00 per 
team 


$30.00 per 
team 


$30.00 per 
team 


$30.00 per 
team 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Middle School Dance 
Admission 


$4.00 


$4.00 


$4.00 


$5.00 


Parks and 
Recreation 


Rental of R.W. Black Community and Senior Center Facilities - see 
Attached Schedule 


Recycling 


Recycling Bins 


$5.00 


$5.00 


$7.00 


$7.00 



146 



Town of Hanover - Rate and Fee Schedule 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2()()'J 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
I Y2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 

l\ 2009- 10 




Trash 
Dumping 


Dump Ticket to City of 
Lebanon Landfill (includes 
surcharge to partially fund 
curbside recycling program) 


$1.50 for 
disposal of 
36 pounds 


$1.50 for 

disposal of 

30 pounds 


$15.00 for 

punch-card 

of 10 

punches; 

disposal of 

29 pounds 

per punch 


$15.00 for 

punch-card of 

10 punches; 

disposal of 29 

pounds per 

punch 



147 



Recapture Fee Table - The Recapture Fee will be determined by multiplying the peak 
day flow in gallons by $10.14 per gallon. The following are flows which shall be used to 
determine the peak day flow from a sewer connection: 






Meter Size 



FY2007-2008 Sewer Rates 



Annual 

Base 

Capacity 

Charge 



Flow Charge 

per 1000 

Cubic Feet of 

Water Used 



FY2008-2009 Sewer Rates 



Annual Base 

Capacity 

Charge 



Flow Charge 

per 1000 

Cubic Feet of 

Water Used 



FY2009-2010 Sewer Rates 



Annual Base 

Capacity 

Charge 



Flow Charge 

per 1000 

Cubic Feet of 

Water Used 



5/8" 



$83.00 



$27.24 



$83.00 



$27.24 



$84.00 



$27.24 



3/4' 



$235.00 



$27.24 



$235.00 



$27.24 



$236.00 



$27.24 



1" 



$615.00 



$27.24 



$615.00 



$27.24 



$616.00 



$27.24 



1 1/4" 



$921.00 



$27.24 



$921.00 



$27.24 



$920.00 



$27.24 



1 1/2" 



$1,227.00 



$27.24 



$1,227.00 



$27.24 



$1,227.00 



$27.24 



$1,964.00 



$27.24 



$1,964.00 



$27.24 



$1,964.00 



$27.24 



3" 



$4,620.00 



$27.24 



$4,620.00 



$27.24 



$4,620.00 



$27.24 



4" 



$7,219.00 



$27.24 



$7,219.00 



$27.24 



$7,220.00 



$27.24 



6" 



$43,313.00 



$27.24 



$43,313.00 



$27.24 



$43,312.00 



$27.24 



Average Domestic Bill (275 
gallons/day) 



$448.56 



$448.56 



$450.00 



Unmetered Sewer Accounts 
Include 25% Surcharge 
Above Average Domestic 
Bill 



$560.70 



$560.70 



$563.00 



Dept/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 
FY2006-07 


Adopted 
FY2007-08 


Adopted 
FY2008-09 


Adopted 
FY2009-10 


Sewer 


Strength Charge - Additional Strength surcharge shall be one of the following, whichever 
is highest: 

BOD Surcharge Volume (MG) X 8.34 X (BOD - 250) X $2.65/pound 

BOD = Biochemical Oxygen Demand 

OR 

TSS Surcharge Volume (MG) X 8.34 X (TSS - 250) X $2.65/pound 

TSS = Total Suspended Solids 


Sewer 


Septage - Tipping Fee for 
Residents (fee is per 1 ,000 
gallons) 


$110 


$110 


$110 


$110 


Sewer 


Septage - Tipping Fee for 
Non-Residents (fee is per 
1.000 gallons) 


$130 


$130 


$130 


$130 


Sewer 


Septage - Tipping Fee for 
Non-Residents from Towns 
who have banned Land 
Application of Sludge (fee is 
per 1,000 gallons) 


$200 


$200 


$200 


$200 



148 



Recapture Fee Table - The Recapture Fee will be determined by multiplying the peak 
day flow in gallons by $10.14 per gallon. The following are flows which shall be used to 
determine the peak day flow from a sewer connection: 



Dent/Board 


Type of Fee 


Adopted 


Adopted 


Adopted 


Adopted 






FY2006-07 


FY2007-08 


FY2008-09 


FY2009-10 




Connection Fee for Hanover 












Sewer System - Includes Basic 












Fee of $200.00 to Cover 1 










Sewer 


Inspection and a Recapture Fee 




$200.00 + 


$200.00 + 


$200.00 + 




of$1.40/gallonofGPD 


$200.00 + 


$10.14/ 


$10.14/ 


$10.14/ 




(Gallons per Day as 


$1.40/gallon 


gallon of 


gallon of 


gallon of 




determined below) 


ofGPD 


GPD 


GPD 


GPD 



Description 

Apartment 

Studio (one bedroom) 
Per Bedroom 

Athletic Facilities including Gyms and Stadiums 

Participant 



GPD 



Bar/Lounge 
Bed & Breakfast 
Camps 



Catering & Dinning 

Facilities 

Church 

Country Club 



Dentists 



Doctors Office 



Classroom 
Spectator 



Campground w/ comfort station 

Recreation Trailers 

Construction Sites 

Day Camp no meals 

Resort Camp (night & Day) limited 

plumbing 

Dining Facility Only 



Sanctuary 

Dining Room 

Snack Bar 

Locker and Showers 

Chair 
Staff 

Patient 



Units 



225 




150 


bedroom 


15 


person 


15 


seat 


3 


seat 


20 


seat 


60 


Bedroom 


25 


site 


90 


site 


50 


site 


15 


site 


50 


person 


25 


person 



12 patron 



5 seat 



10 


seat 


10 


seat 


20 


locker 


200 


each 


35 


employee 



1 each 



149 



Recapture Fee Table - The Recapture Fee will be determined by multiplying the peak 
day flow in gallons by $10.14 per gallon. The following are flows which shall be used to 
determine the peak day flow from a sewer connection: 



Staff 
Dog Kennels 
Dwelling 

(two bedroom minimum) 
Rooming House with meals 
Rooming House without meals 
Factories (excluding industrial waste) 

Light industry w/o cafeteria or showers 

Light industry with cafeteria no 

showers 

Light industry with cafeteria and 

showers 

Warehouse 

Assembly 

Research Facilities 
Floor Drain not allowed 

Fraternities & Sororities 
Hairdressers 



Hospital 



Bed 



Hotel & Motel 

single bed 
double bed 

Laundromats, coined operated 

Maintenance Facility 

Nursing Homes & Assisted Living Facilities 

Office Building 



Picnic Parks 



Restaurant or Cafeteria 



W/O cafeteria 
With cafeteria 
Unspecified Office Space 

Bathroom only 

Bath house, showers and toilets 

Eat-in with bathroom and kitchen waste 
Eat-in paper service, plus toilet and 
kitchen waste 
Kitchen waste only 



35 employee 

50 kennel 

150 bedroom 

60 bedroom 

40 bedroom 

20 employee 

25 employee 

35 employee 

35 employee 

20 employee 
to be determined 

150 bed 

150 chair 

35 employee 

250 Bed 

100 bed 

200 bed 

500 machine 
to be determined 

125 bed 

1 5 Employee 

20 employee 

15 100 SF 

5 person 

10 person 

40 seat 

20 seat 

3 seat 



150 



Recapture Fee Table - The Recapture Fee will be determined by multiplying the peak 
day flow in gallons by $10.14 per gallon. The following are flows which shall be used to 
determine the peak day flow from a sewer connection: 



Bars and lounges 
Bars and lounges 
Function Rooms 
School 



Post Secondary 
Post Secondary 
Service Stations 
Shopping Centers: 
Large Dry Goods 



Boarding 

Day Care & Nursery 

Day, without gym, cafeteria or showers 

Day, without gym, showers with 

cafeteria 

Day, with gyms, showers and cafeteria 

Post Secondary School/Classroom 
School/Dormitory 
School/Dormitory with Cafeteria 



Small Dry Goods 

Swimming Pools 
Tennis Courts 
Theatres 
Workers 



With meat dept. with garbage grinder 
With meat dept. w/o garbage grinder 
With deli 

With deli 



Construction bathroom only 



20 seat 

35 employee 

1 2 seat 

100 bed 

1 5 Person 

1 5 Person 

20 Person 

35 Person 

1 5 student visit 

85 bed 

125 bed 

1 vehicle 

5 100 SF 
NOT ALLOWED 

11 100 SF 
3 meal 

100 Each 

3 meal 

1000 800 SF 

250 per Court 

5 seat 

5 employee 



Food grinding is prohibited - period - if discovered, a notice to cease the activity within 30 days, or penalties of 
$150.00/day shall be instituted. A reoccurrence will be charged $500.00, and then disconnection of service. 

Discharges of Fats Oil and Grease (F.O.G.) above 250 mg/L shall be assessed any line flushing charges. 
Any blockages or Sanitary Sewer Overflow's (SSO) attributed to F.O.G. shall warrant the discharger to be charged 
for all cleanup and administrative costs as well as an impact fee of $500.00, with disconnection of service 
after 2 occurrences. 



151 



Richard W. Black Recreation and Senior Center Fee Structure 

for FY2009-10 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen: June 22, 2009 

Security and Key Deposits will be reviewed on individual basis. 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

Category #1 — No Charge 

Hanover Recreation Department programs, Town Functions, Programs run by the Senior Center, Youth in Action, 
or Town of Hanover After School Program. 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

Category #2 — No Charge 

Hanover based organizations that are not charging admission, dues, participation fee or paying instructors through 
an organization to run a program and are serving Hanover Residents only. 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

Category #3 - $ 25.00 Hour {Per Room} 

Hanover based organizations that are charging admission, dues, participation fees or paying instructors through an 
organization to run a program and are serving Hanover residents only. 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

Category #4 - $35.00 Hour {Per Room} 

Non Hanover based organizations groups that are serving a regional area. 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

Category #5 Flat Fee {Multi Purpose Room, Room 106-107-108 Only} {Prices based on 4 hour time slots} 

Residents {Hanover/Etna} $100 Non-Residents $150 

Banquets {Multi Purpose Room} 

Hanover School $125 Non-Hanover $175 

Fundraising Events $175 Hanover Based Groups 

$200 Dresden School District Groups 

$275 Non-Hanover Based Groups 

All Political Organizations {Multi Purpose Room} $300 

One Day Special Events such as birthday parties, political events, service organizations, social events and banquets, to 
mention a few, will be charged a flat fee per four hours of usage. Special equipment is available for use during the events 
at an additional fee. Example: Bouncy Castle $45 per 4 hour use. 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

Revised: June 2009 

1 . The programs conducted by the Hanover Recreation Staff, Senior Center Staff, Town of Hanover After 
School Program or any Town of Hanover government activities will be exempt from building fees. 

2. Special rooms such as craft, kitchen could include additional fees for supplies. 

3. Those activities that wish to store equipment while running programs will be charged a storage fee ranging 
from $25-$50 a month depending on quantity. 

4. PA system, along with other special equipment, is available and a fee could be charged. 

5. If any additional work needs to be done for set up an additional fee could be charged. 

152 



2009 TOWN MEETING 
TOWN OF HANOVER 

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 
Hanover High School Gymnasium 

The annual Town Meeting of the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire convened on May 12, 2009 at 7 a.m. 
by the Town Moderator, Daniel Nelson, at the Hanover High School Gymnasium. Moderator Nelson 
explained that the polls would be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. for the purpose of voting for 
candidates for Town Offices and for all other articles requiring vote by official ballot as set forth in Articles 
One through Four of the Town Meeting Warrant. 

ARTICLE ONE: To vote (by nonpartisan ballot) for the following Town Officers: 

Two Selectmen, each to serve for a term of three (3) years; 
Katherine S. Connolly 302 (Re-elected) 

Judith A. Doherty 288 (Elected) 

Write-ins 6 

One Moderator to serve for a term of one (1) year; 
Daniel M. Nelson 324 

Write-ins 2 

One Library Trustee to serve for a term of three (3) years; 
Rhonda N.S. Siegel 314 

Write-ins 1 

One Trustee of Trust Funds to serve for a term of three (3) years. 
Judson T. (Jay) Pierson 322 

ARTICLE TWO (to vote by ballot): To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing Hanover Zoning 
Ordinance as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board in Amendment No. 1 : 

The following is on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 1 as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board 
for the Hanover Zoning Ordinance as follows?" 

Amendment No. 1 would amend two definitions in Section 902 Term Definitions: the definition of 
"essential service" by adding "electrical transformers" to the list of minor additions; and the 
definition of "structure" by adding "electrical transformers" to the list of those items not considered 
structures. 

At a public hearing held on March 10, 2009, the Hanover Planning Board voted unanimously to 
recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. 

RESULTS: YES 317 NO 29 ARTICLE PASSED 

ARTICLE THREE (to vote by ballot): To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing Hanover Zoning 
Ordinance as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board in Amendment No. 2: 

The following is on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 2 as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board 
for the Hanover Zoning Ordinance as follows?" 

Amendment No. 2 would amend Section 317.2 paragraph E to allow the display on a scoreboard of 
a team logo, the name of the athletic field, and the name of the athletic facility donor(s); and to 
prohibit commercial advertising of any type on an athletic scoreboard. 



153 



At a public hearing held on March 10, 2009, the Hanover Planning Board voted unanimously to 
recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. 

RESULTS: YES 310 NO 35 ARTICLE PASSED 

ARTICLE FOUR (to vote by ballot): To see if the Town will vote to amend the existing Hanover Zoning 
Ordinance as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board in Amendment No. 3: 

The following is on the official ballot: 

"Are you in favor of the adoption of Amendment No. 3 as proposed by the Hanover Planning Board 
for the Hanover Zoning Ordinance as follows?" 

Amendment No. 3 would amend Section 502.5 by adding a new paragraph G which grants the 
Planning Board the authority to approve any arrangement and dimension of required parking spaces 
in a Planned Residential Development that the Board deems appropriate to the safety and design of 
the development. 

At a public hearing held on March 10, 2009, the Hanover Planning Board voted unanimously to 
recommend that Town Meeting adopt this zoning amendment. 

RESULTS: YES 282 NO 64 ARTICLE PASSED 



BUSINESS MEETING 

Moderator Nelson started the meeting and introduced Rohan Zeng and Rine Uhm (students from the Ray 
School) who performed America the Beautiful. 

Moderator Nelson asked that the members of the Board of Selectmen introduce themselves. Chairman 
Brian Walsh, Vice Chairman Kate Connolly, Selectman Bill Baschnagel, Selectman Peter Christie, and 
Selectman Athos Rassias introduced themselves to the audience. 

Moderator Nelson asked Julia Griffin, Town Manager, to introduce the Department Heads and Town Staff. 
Ms. Griffin introduced Hank Tenney, Recreation Director; Mary White, Howe Library Director; Corey 
Stevens, IT Director; Roger Bradley, Fire Chief; Nick Giaccone, Police Chief; Peter Kulbacki, Public Works 
Director; Mike Ryan, Assessor; Betsy McClain, Administrative Services Director; Jonathan Edwards, 
Planning & Zoning Director; and Myra Johnson, Human Resources Director. 

Moderator Nelson noted that it was a daunting task to appear as the Town's Moderator. He attended his first 
Town Meeting in 1977 and he has long been an admirer of Harry Bird's and Willy Black's management of 
these meetings. He stated he would do his best and be mindful that this is the townspeople's meeting; this is 
one of the few places and few occasions where they practice direct democracy and his role is to facilitate the 
proceedings that allows full deliberation of the matters before them and that provides the procedure for 
voting that reflects the will of the people of the Town. 

Moderator Nelson gave an overview of the process for Articles being brought forth and subsequent 
discussions. Moderator Nelson stated that the Select Board members would read the motion only once 
unless there was a request that it be repeated. He also requested the meeting's permission to allow non- 
residents to speak to the articles pertaining to Social Service funding requests. 

Moderator Nelson noted that he would be recusing himself during deliberation and voting for Article 
Fourteen concerning the Hanover Water Works Company because he has been involved in this issue as an 
employee of Dartmouth College. Willy Black has agreed to preside over that discussion. 



154 



ARTICLE FIVE: To choose the following Town Officers to be elected by a majority vote: 

Vice Chairman Connolly MOVED to nominate the following persons for the following offices: 

One member of the Advisory Board of Assessors for a term of three (3) years; 
Richard Birnie 

Three Fence Viewers, each for a term of one (1) year; 
Edward Lathem, William Garrity, and Robert Morris 

Two Surveyors of Wood and Timber, each for a term of one (1) year; 
John Richardson and Ed Chamberlain 

One Pine Park Commissioner for a term of three (3) years; 
Linda Fowler 

Such other officers as the Town may judge necessary for managing its affairs. 

Chairman Walsh SECONDED the motion. 

There was no further discussion on Article Five. The motion passed and the nominees were ELECTED. 

ARTICLE SIX: To receive reports from the Selectmen, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Collector of Taxes and 
other Town Officers and to vote on any motion relating to these reports and to receive any special 
resolutions that may be appropriate and to vote thereon. 

Vice Chairman Connolly MOVED that the reports from the Selectmen, Town Clerk, Treasurer, 
Collector of Taxes and other Town Officers as printed in the 2008 Town Report be accepted, as well 
as any Special Resolutions. Chairman Walsh SECONDED the motion. 

Vice Chairman Connolly read the following statement to recognize Nancy Collier's contributions to the 
Town of Hanover: 

"Nancy Collier has been an appointed official in Hanover for over 21 years. She joined the Hanover 
Conservation Commission in 1983 and served as its' chair from 1987 until 1992. A break from public 
service began in 1993, presumably to tend to her two young sons and lasted until 1997 when Nancy was 
appointed to the Planning Board. In 1999 Nancy was elected Chairman and served as the chair of the 
Hanover Planning Board for a decade until her resignation last month. 

Nancy has provided thoughtful, reliable and intelligent leadership through the review of over 200 site plans 
and subdivisions. 

The leadership required to complete the nine-year 2003 revision of the Hanover Master Plan demanded 
stamina, negotiating skills, and determination. Through the last half of the nine year Master Planning 
process and for a number of successful smaller planning projects that contributed to the Master Plan or that 
have implemented the Master Plan Nancy kept the Board on task, always patient, working through complex 
sets of goals and recommendations and always maintaining a spirit of camaraderie amongst board members. 

Nancy's leadership has included active participation in many of the other projects that she oversaw over the 
years. Some of the projects in which Nancy has been involved are: 

As a Conservation Commissioner, Nancy helped to locate and apply for funding to protect three properties 
using LCIP funds and as Chairman she oversaw the development of our first Wetlands Ordinance. 

During her tenure as Chairman of the Planning Board; Nancy chaired the Scenic Locales Committee which 
undertook an inventory of scenic locales in Hanover and developed a strategy for protecting these beautiful 
and/or historic places. 

Nancy participated as a member of the Downtown Vision Committee in 2001 which developed a set of 
downtown design guidelines as well as a comprehensive set of Zoning Amendments for our downtown, the 
Mountain Bike Subcommittee which produced a plan for a system of mountain bike trails, the Route 120 
Corridor Management Plan Steering Committee in 2006-2007 which sought a management plan for the 



155 



inter-municipal Route 120 corridor, the Rural Group in 2007 which sought strategies for protecting natural 
resources in rural Hanover and the Wetlands Group in 2007 which amended the wetlands regulations to 
more closely conform to State regulations. 

On to the best part; Nancy, as Planning Board Member & Chair: 

She ran efficient meetings keeping the discussion on track and on point. Her minimal tolerance for a lack of 
succinctness, beating around the bush and for intellectual rambling and musing was well known. At the 
same time, she respected divergent views and consistently showed her respect for others and their ideas, 
including the most long-winded. She handled all manner of frustrations such as the inevitable slowdowns, 
tangents, and side-channels appearing in the discussions in an exemplary manner and with a self-control that 
over time became legendary. 

She was always well prepared for every meeting, going over all the identifiable issues ahead of time and 
mentally organizing the meeting in advance distilling and organizing the issues as well as keeping track of 
the progress on each case. 

She has always challenged the P&Z staff— on timeliness, diligence in researching and consideration of all 
aspects of a case relevant to the Planning Board's review and decision-making. She demanded adherence to 
lawfully prescribed procedures and standards in guiding the Board on prospective improvements to rules 
and regulations as well as proper follow-through on processing and enforcing the Board's decisions. 

She has always been intelligent, creative, cheerful, energetic and positive in her leadership of the Planning 
Board. The policies that evolved and the laws and ordinances that were created and enacted during Nancy's 
tenure on the Board will serve to guide the Town's development well into the future. The Town of Hanover 
has been truly enhanced by the selfless service of Nancy Collier and will forever be in her debt." 

Vice Chairman Connolly and Julia Griffin, Town Manager, presented Nancy Collier with a Town of 
Hanover rocking chair as a token of the Town's appreciation for her service. 

Moderator Nelson invited Jill Polli to make a presentation for the Recreation Volunteer of the Year. Ms. 
Polli made the following presentation: 

"The Hanover Parks and Recreation Department has 5 great employees, but that is not nearly enough 
people to run all of the programs and sports events that we put on each year. The department requires 
dozens of volunteers each year as coaches and for special events such as Pond Party, Muster Day and the 
Old Fashioned 4 th of July. Without volunteers we would never be able to offer the programs we have 
available to all of you here in Town. That being said, each year we as the Parks and Recreation Board like 
to acknowledge and individual who has provided some of the much needed support that our department 
requires. 

I am honored to be acknowledging the person who is receiving the Hanover Parks and Recreation 
Department volunteer of the year award for 2009. He is someone who runs a local family business but 
somehow has found the time to coach baseball, basketball and football for our department. You all may 
know Mike Campbell has the owner-operator of the Hanover Tru- Value Hardware Store but you may not be 
aware that he has been an invaluable resource to our children. In asking around about Mike, I found that 
Mike volunteered to be the head coach of the 4 th -6 th grade football program which, as Mike Ivanoski pointed 
out to me, is no easy task and it translates in to a lot more than just coaching. Being a head coach required 
Mike to oversee the coaching staff, plan practices, help with fundraising - and the list goes on. Mr. Ivanoski 
pointed out that Mike Campbell volunteers so that the children in our community can be children, and that 
they are provided with numerous opportunities to shine as teammates and as individuals. Mr. Ivanoski said 
that Mike "is an inspiration to me and many of our community members." 

But while he finds time to coach three sports, Mike is also a Scout Leader and an annual volunteer at the 
Howl at the Moon event put on by Dartmouth. 

Mike is also active as Hartford High Schools Alumni Association President and has been so since 2004. 
Mike is husband to Sonya and father to Larissa, Spencer and Bryce. 



156 



I know that Mike is going to have a tough call next fall when his son Bryce moves up and out of the age 
bracket that Mike coaches in football - as the younger players are begging Mike to remain with them. It is 
heartening to see that Mike has gained the respect of his players that they do not want to see him go. 

I could go on for quite a while as I spoke to numerous other folks who were happy to tell me Mike Campbell 
stories - but I think you get the idea! 

Mike is valued by the school community, the Dartmouth community and certainly by the Hanover Parks and 
Recreation Department. He is a kind, caring and hardworking man who constantly gives to others. It is time 
for Mike Campbell to be recognized for all that he does. Congratulations Mike! !" 

ARTICLE SEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $10,380 for deposit into the 
Land and Capital Improvements Fund, and to authorize funding of this amount by transfer from the Land 
Use Change Tax Reserve, with no funds being raised by taxation. The amount appropriated is the equivalent 
of 50% of the total collected in the Land Use Change Tax Reserve in the fiscal year 2007-2008. Funds that 
have been deposited into the Land Use Change Tax Reserve Fund come from land use change taxes, paid by 
property owners when they take their land out of current use. 

Selectman Baschnagel stated that he would read each Article (Articles Seven through Eleven) and then ask 
for discussion before a vote. 

ARTICLE EIGHT: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $10,380 for deposit into the 
Conservation Fund created as authorized by RSA 36-A:5.1, and to authorize funding of this amount by 
transfer from the Land Use Change Tax Reserve, with no funds being raised by taxation. The amount 
appropriated is the equivalent of 50% of the total collected in the Land Use Change Tax Reserve in the fiscal 
year 2007-2008. Funds that have been deposited into the Land Use Change Tax Reserve Fund come from 
land use change taxes, paid by property owners when they take their land out of current use. 

ARTICLE NEVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $1,187,570 and authorize payment 
into existing capital reserve funds in the following amounts for the purposes for which such funds were 
established: 

Ambulance Equipment Capital Reserve Fund $ 50,100 

Bridge Replacement and Renovation Capital Reserve Fund $ 30,000 

Building Maintenance and Improvement Capital Reserve Fund $ 50,000 
Dispatch Equipment and Dispatch Center Enhancements and 

Capital Reserve Fund $ 10,000 

Fire Department Vehicle and Equipment Capital Reserve Fund $ 64,000 
Highway Construction and Maintenance Equipment Capital 

Reserve Fund $ 240,000 
Parking Operations Vehicles and Parking Facility 

Improvements Capital Reserve Fund $ 62,210 

Police Vehicles and Equipment Capital Reserve Fund $ 66,000 

Road Construction and Improvements Capital Reserve Fund $ 20,000 
Sewer Equipment and Facilities Improvements Capital Reserve 

Fund $580,260 

Town Revaluation Capital Reserve Fund $ 15,000 

ARTICLE TEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $369,986 for the purposes listed 
below, and to authorize funding these amounts by withdrawal from the listed capital reserve funds in the 
following amounts: 

Ambulance Equipment Capital Reserve Fund 

Ambulance 150 $161,000 

Highway Construction and Maintenance Equipment Capital 
Reserve Fund 

Leaf vacuum, Truck 03, Chipper, Dozer, V-Box $169,700 



157 



Sander 
Police Vehicles and Equipment Capital Reserve Fund 

Cruiser- Utility Vehicle $39,286 

This will be a non-lapsing appropriation per RSA 32:7, VI and will not lapse until these specified 
purchases are complete or June 30, 2012, whichever is sooner. 

ARTICLE ELEVEN: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $35,135 for deposit into the 
Municipal Transportation Improvement Fund, and to authorize funding of this amount by transfer from the 
Transportation Improvement Fee Reserve, with no funds being raised by taxation. This amount is equivalent 
to the total Transportation Fee surcharge for each motor vehicle registered in the Town of Hanover ($5.00 
per vehicle) during fiscal year 2007-2008. 

Selectman Baschnagel MOVED Articles Seven through Eleven as written in the Town Warrant. 
Chairman Walsh SECONDED the motion. 

John Ruth questioned the need to replace the ambulance and the police cruiser in this budget. Fire Chief 
Roger Bradley stated that the ambulance is 10 years old and needs extensive repair or to be replaced. Police 
Chief Nicholas Giaccone stated that the cruiser up for replacement is the Expedition. The Expedition is now 
7 years old and should have been replaced last year according to the fleet management schedule. The 
amount of $39,286 includes the cost of the vehicle and the extra equipment such as the radios, lights, sirens 
and mobile data system. 

Chairman Walsh stated that the Town has capital reserve schedules that are developed by Frank Austin from 
Public Works and Betsy McClain, Finance Director for all of the vehicles and equipment in Town. They 
project when it is economically beneficial to replace vehicles and sell the used vehicles in the market. 
During budget discussions, the Board asks this very question and whether they can put off replacement for 
another year or how they can save money on this transaction. 

The motion PASSED and Articles Seven through Eleven were ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE TWELVE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $18,154,412 to pay the 
operating expenses of the Town for the 2009-2010 fiscal year, for the purposes set forth in the Town budget. 
This sum does not include the funds voted in any of the preceding or succeeding articles. 

Selectman Christie MOVED that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $18,154,412 to pay the 
operating expenses of the Town for the 2009-2010 fiscal year, for the purposes set forth in the Town 
budget. This sum does not include the funds voted in any of the preceding or succeeding articles. 
Chairman Walsh SECONDED the motion. 

Selectman Christie made the following presentation to Town Meeting: 

"This is a great budget. Usually I tell you all the bad stuff first and then end with the good, but I am going 
to reverse that order this year. 

I am also going to try and be brief, since I think there is perhaps more interest in Article 14 coming up 
shortly and because I have not yet negotiated with our new town Moderator my "one minute per million" 
prerogative. I am also not sure of the size of his hook should I run over. 

We started this budget season forecasting a 7.5% overall tax increase to maintain the status quo based on our 
five year plan. This gave us concern in light of the economic downturn, the State threat to withhold 
significant money that normally comes our way, and a possible county tax increase for the new jail. 

Given all these concerns, the Select Board asked Julia to prepare not only a steady state budget, but also to 
identify and prioritized cuts that would get us to 5% and 3.5% tax rate increases. 

Julia, Betsy, and the Department Heads rolled up their sleeves and in the spirit of understanding that this 
could not be a "business as usual" budget, did a exemplary job of delivering proposed budgets that started 
at 5% and worked their way down to a 0% increase. The Board ultimately settled on a final budget with a 



158 



Town -wide overall tax impact of 0.6% for municipal services, including fire protection. Because we are 
still phasing in the new Fire District allocations approved in 2008, the impact on your taxes will vary based 
on your Fire District as highlighted in the Town Report. 

This overall tax increase of less than one percent was accomplished even while taking into account 
anticipated decreases in local revenue from such areas as building permit fees, car registration fees, and 
short term investment income. 

These lower revenues were somewhat offset by a low December CPI which impacts many wage increases, 
by a low increase in health care costs, and by retirements that were filled by staff earlier in their careers. 

All this is good, but the elephant in the room is what the State will eventually do to balance their budget. 
The State is facing a budget shortfall in the range of $550 million, and because they have no broad based 
taxes to turn to, they are going through their usual gyrations to balance their budget. Although this is still a 
work in progress we are fearful of a significant downshifting of taxes to the local level. This would take the 
form of the State no longer sharing the customary amount from Meals and Rooms taxes, for Building Aid, 
and for Block Grants to name a few. In total the Town received over $900,000 from the state in the current 
fiscal year, much of which is at risk for next year. 

After much discussion the Select Board decided that should the State renege on its commitments to the 
Town, we will have no choice but to pass those revenue shortfalls along as an additional tax hike 
compliments of Concord. The amounts are potentially too big to be dealt with at the local level without 
serious disruption to local services. This may also be compounded by the underfunding of the State 
Retirement fund and the eventual building of the new county jail, both of which will require significant tax 
revenue to pay the bills 

So, I think we have done our job at the local level to reduce spending in line with reduced local revenues 
and general economic conditions for our citizens, but we will have to wait and see what comes out of 
Concord. 

I once again thank all of Department Heads and, for that matter, all Town staff who do such a fine job day in 
and day out. With that I would like to open the floor for discussion." 

Elizabeth Crory asked about the Downtown Business Service District which showed a decrease and she 
wondered what it was and why it has changed. Chairman Walsh stated that this is the Downtown Marketing 
District which was created at the merchants' request approximately five years ago and there is a Selectmen's 
Advisory Committee which decides how much they would like to tax themselves for the coming year. This 
year they are asking that the amount of funds raised be half of what it has been previously because of the 
economic conditions. Instead of raising $50,000, they have asked that the Town raise $25,000. It comes 
directly from the downtown properties and goes into creating business for the downtown properties. 

Elizabeth Crory asked if this was connected to the Parking Garage Fund. Chairman Walsh stated that this is 
different from the Parking Garage. 

The motion PASSED and Article Twelve was ADOPTED as written. 

Moderator Nelson moved on to Article Fourteen at the recommendation of the Board of Selectmen and then 
would return to Article Thirteen. 

ARTICLE THIRTEEN: To see if the Town will direct its Legislative Delegation to support continued full 
funding of municipal aid for Rooms & Meals, Revenue Sharing, Highway Aid and the New Hampshire 
State Retirement System contributions on behalf of municipalities from State revenue sources and not 
Federal stimulus funding. 

Chairman Walsh MOVED that the Town vote to direct its Legislative Delegation to support 
continued full funding of municipal aid for Rooms & Meals, Revenue Sharing, Highway Aid and the 
New Hampshire State Retirement System contributions on behalf of municipalities from State 
revenue sources and not Federal stimulus funding. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 



159 



Moderator Nelson asked for any discussion on Article Thirteen. Chairman Walsh stated that this motion was 
written by the New Hampshire Municipal Association and put into a number of March Town Meetings 
throughout the State when it appeared that the money which is usually given to municipalities was being 
used to balance the State's budget instead. There was hope that there would be Federal stimulus money that 
would help fund the schools. Since that time, the budget that was passed by the House took half of the 
money provided to the Town's and it is unclear how much money will come through to the Town. The 
essence of the motion sends a message to the legislators in Concord telling them not to balance the State 
budget with property taxes. 

The motion PASSED and Article Thirteen was ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE FOURTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to acquire those assets of Hanover Water Works 
Company, Inc. necessary to operate the water system as a municipal utility serving the Town's inhabitants, 
in accordance with RSA 38. If approved, there will be a second vote by Special Town Meeting in the fall of 
2009 to approve the price to acquire the water utility assets. A two-thirds vote is required on this article. 

Moderator Black was asked to present Article Fourteen. She noted she was approached just prior to Town 
Meeting to act as Moderator for this Article. 

Selectman Christie stated that he would be drinking a lot of water during this presentation and made the 
following statement regarding Article Fourteen: 

"The wording on this article was mandated by State law, but unfortunately does not fully reflect our intent. 
To correct this I have added language in my motion that hopefully makes it clear that the vote tonight 
merely allows the Select Board to negotiate a final municipalization agreement and that that agreement will 
be subject to a vote at a Special Town Meeting in the fall." 

Selectman Christie MOVED that the Town vote to acquire those assets of Hanover Water Works 
Company, Inc. necessary to operate the water system as a municipal utility serving the Town's 
inhabitants, in accordance with RSA 38. If approved, there will be a second vote by Special Town 
Meeting in the fall of 2009 to approve the price to acquire the water utility assets. In addition to price, 
the final transfer agreement between the Town and the Hanover Water Works Company to acquire 
the assets will be brought before the above mentioned Special Town Meeting. A two-thirds vote is 
required on this article. Chairman Walsh SECONDED the motion. 

An audience member asked Selectman Christie to read the wording that was added to the original Article 14. 
Selectman Christie re-read the following: 

"In addition to price, the final transfer agreement between the Town and the Hanover Water Works 
Company to acquire the assets will be brought before the above mentioned Special Town Meeting in the fall 
of 2009." 

Selectman Christie offered the following as an overview of Article Fourteen: 

"Municipalization of the water supply is not a new topic and has been discussed periodically over at least 
the past 30 years. In fact, one of the reasons that the Town agreed to actually operate the water company 
under contract some 5 years ago was in anticipation of possible municipalization. 

So why now? About nine months ago the Town approached the College to reopen discussions. We realized 
that we had a small window before Jim Wright's retirement and that dealing with the Water Company would 
probably not be a high priority for the new President. We had also built and were successfully operating the 
new filtration plant which was a major investment that was now behind us. From our operating experience 
we could also see many opportunities to be more cost effective and were anxious to take advantage of them. 
In early discussions, the College generously agreed to increase the Town's ownership in the Water 
Company from 47.2% to 50% which was a major step forward in giving the Town additional control of 
future use of the Water Company land. 



160 



The time seemed right, and a joint task force was created. The College was represented by Adam Keller 
(VP of Finance), Bob Donin (College Council) and Dan Nelson (Special Assistant to the President). The 
Town was represented by Julia, myself and Jay Pierson. Jay is one of four Town representative on the 
Water Company Board and the current President of the Water Company, a CPA by training and profession, 
a former Hanover Select Board member and long time Hanover resident and contributor to the Town - and 
perhaps most importantly a member of the infamous Over the Hill skiing gang so Jay and I had plenty of 
time to discuss all the issues riding up chairlifts at Sunapee and the Skiway. 

Hopefully you have read the FAQ's that were sent to you. I do not plan on repeating all of that detailed 
information but rather to give an overview. Please remember that we are NOT voting tonight on 
municipalization, but rather only to authorize the Select Board to take the next step of developing the final 
plan. The work to date has been aimed at putting enough meat on the bones so that you have a pretty good 
idea of where this might all lead, but there is a lot more to do before the fall. 

Let's quickly look at where we are today and what we hope to accomplish with municipalization. 

Today the Town receives its water from a private company which is regulated by the Public Utilities 
Commission (PUC). Under municipalization the Town would assume ownership of all the hard assets of the 
water company, along with its liabilities, and would no longer be regulated by the PUC. 

The PUC has several expensive requirements that would be reduced or eliminated by municipalization. For 
example, the current water company must keep a separate set of books in PUC format, must apply to the 
PUC for any rate increases at a cost of around $50,000 per application, and cannot have capital reserve 
funds to address capital project needs. 

As a municipal service the Town would set up an Enterprise fund within its existing accounting structure 
similar to what we now have for waste water treatment. Water rates would be set by the Select Board and 
we would be able to utilize capital reserve funds. In the event of a need for bonding, the Town would have 
access to less expensive financing than the existing Water Company. We would also see additional savings 
on insurance, billing, and audit costs to mention a few. 

It is important to remember that the costs of supplying water are supported entirely by the rates charged to 
water customers. Current rates are adequate to offset current costs, and the plan is to use the savings from 
municipalization to fund capital reserves. Municipalization will have no impact on current water rates and 
will have a positive impact in funding reserves and controlling future costs. 

The Water Company customers will be well served by this change. 

Property taxes will also not be impacted by municipalization. The property taxes currently paid by the 
Water Company to the General Fund will continue to be paid via a "payment in lieu of taxes" from the new 
water supply enterprise fund to the General Fund thus keeping the General Fund whole. 

So what happens to the Water Company? As described in the FAQ's, specific hard assets will be sold to 
the town for $ 1 . These include the filtration plant, the reservoirs themselves, the water distribution system, 
storage tanks, etc. The Town will also assume the debts of the Water Company which are primarily the 
bond obligations which were used to purchase the assets that are being transferred. In essence the Water 
Company will be converted to a land holding company and will retain some 1,400 acres that make up the 
current water shed. That land will continue to be protected by the existing Federal, State and local 
ordinances and by being in a "forestry" zone. None of those protections will change. Also remember that a 
Town Meeting vote is required to change zoning or to sell Town owned land, thus giving considerable 
control over future use of Water Company land to you the citizens. 

In addition, the Towns ownership in the Water Company would increase from 47.2% to 50%. This is 
significant, because it makes the Town an equal partner with the College in proposing any future use of the 
land. I know that this is not everything that some would like, but please do not underestimate the 
importance of this change as it moves the Town from a minority interest to an equal partner with the College 



161 



as we move down the road. If we move forward with municipalization, no change in use could be proposed 
for this land without consensus between the Town and the College. 

Where from here? Full municipalization will require a vote by the Trustees of the College and by two 
Town Meeting votes, one tonight and one in the fall. Tonight we are asking the Town to give the Selectmen 
approval to consider municipalization and subsequently to call a Special Town Meeting in the fall to seek 
approval of the specific agreement with full terms and conditions. As I have mentioned, the work so far has 
been aimed at giving you a good sense of where this all leads, but there is a lot of detailed work still to do 
prior to a final Town Meeting vote. 

Again, we are NOT voting tonight to municipalize the water system, but only to authorize the Select Board 
to do the remaining homework and to prepare the definitive agreement which will be subject to additional 
public hearings and eventually to a Town Meeting vote. 

Through the public hearing process we have heard many questions and concerns about the long term future 
of the land, the governance of the revised Hanover Water Company, the legal separation of the reservoirs 
from the surrounding watershed to name a few. Many good ideas and legitimate concerns are on the table 
to be considered as we move to the final plan. 
So with that let me open the floor to questions." 

Moderator Black asked for discussion from the floor. 

David Bradley had a procedural question and asked what it is that requires a two-thirds vote and wanted to 
know if it applied to both votes. Ms. Griffin stated that RSA 38 specifically addresses the municipalization 
of water and electric utilities and that RSA requires two votes, one at a regular Town Meeting and the other 
at a subsequent Special Town Meeting; each vote needs to be two-thirds' 

Judy Reeve, Chairman of the Conservation Commission, stated that she wanted to reiterate their previous 
statement that the Commission made regarding their position on the municipalization proposal: The 
Hanover Conservation Commission withholds support from the present HWWC municipalization proposal. 
The proposal is insufficiently specific regarding the ultimate protection, control and disposition of Hanover 
watershed land. 

Ms. Reeve stated that the Commission was established to protect the proper utilization and other natural 
resources and the protection of watershed resources. 

Ms. Reeve personally and separate from the Conservation Commission, has concerns about the liabilities 
and finances that the Town of Hanover would be taking on with the municipalization of the Hanover Water 
Works Company. She noted that Dartmouth would be released from liabilities and they would disengage 
from activities unrelated to Dartmouth's mission. Her opinion is that Dartmouth engages in many activities 
that are unrelated to their mission. She has three areas of concern: 1) contamination, 2) liabilities and 3) 
finances. She didn't find enough information to make a rational vote. She wondered whether Dartmouth 
would agree to a hold harmless clause as part of the contract. 

Barbara Mcllroy, President of the League of Women Voters, asked whether the agreement will include the 
final disposition of the land holding company. Selectman Christie stated that it would clearly address the 
structure of the land holding company 

Ms. Mcllroy encouraged people to vote for this proposal as it is now worded. The League of Women Voters 
asked the Board to consider the following regarding the process: 

1) Arrange for maximum transparency in the negotiation process; to maximize the understanding 
about the evolving agreement, they urge the Board to keep the public informed on the negotiations and 
ideally this would mean that meetings would be properly noticed and that the public would be permitted to 
observe, not necessarily speak and be able to review the Minutes. They understand that this may not be 
possible under such negotiations but other ways to update the public are regular listening sessions, use of the 
website and full debate and discussions about various actions and sticking points. 



162 



2) Consider several alternative arrangements for managing the watershed land. The Select 
Board has proposed a 50/50 proposal but somebody may have a better proposal. The disposition of the 
watershed land remains an open question. They urge the Board to explore options for protection. 

3) Gather input from citizens at Town Meeting and during the negotiation period. 

Bob Russell noted that he listened to the previous comment regarding concerns about contamination and felt 
that it was an irrational objection. 

John Ruth asked what the benefit would be for him to approve municipalization since he is not on Town 
water. 

Selectman Christie stated that by not being on the water system, he would not be impacted positively or 
negatively relative to the cost of the water coming out of his well. There is considerable advantage to 
having the Town be an equal partner with the College which will help the entire Town including those 
individuals on wells. There will be no impact on property taxes with this proposal; currently the Water 
Company pays taxes to the Town and that goes into the General Fund. If the municipalization goes forward, 
the current plan is to have the Enterprise Fund make a payment in lieu of taxes in that same amount so that 
the General Fund is kept whole and therefore the property taxes will not be affected by this. 

Peter Bouchard asked what assurance does he have in future years that this will not affect property taxes and 
the issue regarding the $280,000 payment in lieu of taxes; what is the assurance that the Town will receive 
that money? 

Selectman Christie stated that all costs of water supply are paid for by the water customers in the form of 
rates. Payment in lieu of taxes will require a vote from Concord and they must get approval before going 
forward. The Board anticipates that they will receive this approval. 

Nancy Carter supports and encourages other to allow staff to move forward with this proposal. 

Kim Perez has concerns that the Hanover Water Works Company does not have to hold public hearings. 
Selectman Christie confirmed that the Water Works Company would continue as a private company. The 
land holding company would have to go through the zoning process including Town Meeting for any 
changes. 

Anne Downey, Sargent Street, asked whether the vote in the fall would be a Town Meeting vote or whether 
it could be done as an all day ballot vote. Selectman Christie stated that this would be done with a Town 
Meeting vote. Ms. Downey stated that her concern is that this is not on people's radar and asked for an all 
day ballot vote. Selectman Christie stated that they cannot have an all day vote on this per State law. Ms. 
Downey encouraged an increase in communication and there are a lot of things that people need to learn 
about this. She would hate to see this proposal defeated now and would encourage people to support this 
proposal and move forward. 

Bob Keene asked how this can be a private company for which they are stockholders and not have access to 
meetings in some form. Selectman Christie stated that the current ownership is 47.2% by the Town and it is 
a private company and not subject to Right-to-Know laws or State laws. That status doesn't change; the 
only change is the percentage of ownership. 

David Bradley asked that the Town get an expanded opinion on the all day voting issue and asked whether 
Town Meeting can vote for all day voting. He feels that this can be done. 

Robin Carpenter stated that it is his understanding that an action should be by paper ballot. Mr. Carpenter 
provided a petition with signatures to require a paper vote on this issue. Moderator Black announced that 
with receipt of the petition, they would conduct a paper ballot vote. 

Mr. Carpenter went on to express his concerns regarding the finances, governance process and issues 
surrounding land protection. He stated that there is not a firewall between the rates and the taxpayers. He 
fears that 10 years from now, the agreement will not be flexible enough. He has questions about the savings 
benefit the Town claims it will receive with municipalization and how this will get shared between the users 



163 



and the taxpayers. He also had questions about risk. If there is a bond, the assumption is that it will sit on 
the Town for the ratepayers to pay. 

Mr. Carpenter offered the following amendment to the motion: 

"To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Select Board to negotiate to acquire those assets of the 
Hanover Water Works Company, Inc. necessary to operate the water system as a municipal utility 
serving the Town's inhabitants, in accordance with RSA 38; and to negotiate with Dartmouth College, 
a Charter, By-Laws and a Mission Management Plan for the surviving entity retaining all other assets 
of the Hanover Water Works Company. If approved, there will be a second vote by Special Town 
Meeting in the fall of 2009 to see if the Town will vote to approve the Charter, By-Laws and Plan and 
acquire the water utility assets. A simple majority vote is required." 

Mr. Carpenter explained the differences between the wording he proposes, versus the wording provided by 
the Select Board. 

The motion was SECONDED from the floor. 

Moderator Black re-read the proposed amendment. Moderator Black noted that the amendment cannot 
include changing the two-thirds vote requirement. 

Rich Howarth, 2 Sausville Road, stated that there was huge value in having 1 neighbor versus having 2. The 
Town and the College took 2,000 acres of land and manage it under one entity. The staff of the Water 
Company not only works on the infrastructure but it also oversees the land. Mr. Carpenter's amendment is 
so important because having one entity in charge of the eco systems and the land; he worries about who is 
actually going to be handling land management and it bothers him that this hasn't been answered. 

Elsa Garmine asked whether this amendment is changing the vote in September. Moderator Black stated 
that the changes in the amendment requires a Charter, By-Laws and a management plan by September. 

Jim Mitchell stated that it is his understanding that tonight's vote is to move forward. He applauds the 
amendment and the concerns brought forth. He urges everyone to vote down the amendment and have the 
Select Board bring the right package for final approval in September. 

Sheila Buckley asked the Select Board to clarify why Mr. Carpenter's amendment isn't a good idea. Ms. 
Griffin stated that the wording for the Article is specific to RSA 38. The statute was written anticipating 
that the municipalization of a water utility would be a hostile takeover. The Town has consulted with two 
attorneys in addition to Walter Mitchell who suggested the wording of the Article. Removing the word 
"price" from the Article would not be appropriate. Ms. Griffin stated that in changing the vote to majority 
vote might be challenged later. 

Selectman Christie reiterated that through the public hearing process, the Board has gathered questions and 
concerns that will be worked on. 

Deb Nelson called the question. The audience voted to end the discussion. The proposed amendment to 
the original motion FAILED by majority vote. 

Elizabeth Crory suggested that the Town consider placing part of the savings into a reserve fund and part of 
it to reduce the rates. Ms. Crory asked how the title will be held and had concern that the Town will own the 
assets but not the land. 

Ms. Griffin explained that the land on which the hard assets sit will be owned by the Town. 

Peter Williamson made a suggestion that they provide an explanation as to why this is fair for the Town and 
the College. He would like to know how the College is being charged for water. There is suspicion that the 
College will be taking advantage of the Town. He would like to see this information before the vote in the 
fall. 

Hilary Pridgen would like to see what the Charter and the By-Laws will be for the land holding company 
prior to the next vote. 



164 



Richard Podolec stated that he works on the Finance Committee. He noted that they asked many of the 
same questions regarding this transaction. He read the following statement in support: 

Hanover Finance Committee supports Article Fourteen as moved by Selectman Christie and looks forward 
to reviewing the final agreement before the Town Meeting in September, 2009. 

Winifred Stearns, 5 Dorrance Place, noted that she heard that the public would not have to worry about any 
changes to zoning on this land. She was interested in the word conservation and felt that this is the only 
thing that will protect the land. Zoning can be changed through the Planning Board and presented to Town 
Meeting. She wanted to know who would be allowed to challenge the forestry designation. She would like 
to see some form of commitment between now and September from the Select Board that they would 
consider putting this land into conservation. 

Jed Williamson called the question regarding the original motion. The audience unanimously agreed to 
end the discussion. 

Moderator Black instructed the audience to use their paper ballots to vote for or against the original motion 
for Article Fourteen. 

RESULTS: YES 196 NO 10 ARTICLE PASSED 

ARTICLE FIFTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Hanover Planning Board to delegate 
its site plan powers and duties in regard to minor site plans to a site review committee of technically 
qualified administrators designated by the Planning Board, with the concurrence of the Town Manager, in 
accordance with the provisions of RSA 674:43 III. This special site review committee shall have final 
authority to approve or disapprove minor site plans; however, the decision of the committee may be 
appealed to the full Planning Board. 

Vice chairman Connolly MOVED that the Town vote to authorize the Hanover Planning Board to 
delegate its site plan powers and duties in regard to minor site plans to a site review committee of 
technically qualified administrators designated by the Planning Board, with the concurrence of the 
Town Manager, in accordance with the provisions of RSA 674:43 III. This special site review 
committee shall have final authority to approve or disapprove minor site plans; however, the decision 
of the committee may be appealed to the full Planning Board. Chairman Walsh SECONDED the 
motion. 

Vice Chairman Connolly offered the following additional information regarding Article Fifteen: 

"At the present time when an application is made to the Planning Board for Site Plan review which is 
required for construction of and /or the change in size or use of all principal and accessory uses of non- 
residential and multi-family residential dwellings, parking Facilities and outdoor Eating Establishments the 
application is reviewed by the Planning and Zoning staff and when it is considered complete placed on the 
Planning Board agenda and a hearing is held. Occasionally this request appears as a waiver of the Site Plan 
review usually when the expansion or use does not create more than 1000 sq ft and/or the change does not 
materially affect the abutters or the area. 

This request is to allow the Planning Board to delegate the review of some Site Plans to a committee of 
qualified administrators designated by the Planning Board with the agreement of the Town Manager. This 
procedure is permitted by the NH State Law RSA 676:4 (III) and requires that "the Planning Board adopt 
or amend its regulations specifying application, acceptance and approval procedures and defining what size 
and kind of site plans may be reviewed by the Site Plan review Committee prior to authorizing the 
Committee". If this request is approved, after placing the use and size change thresholds and the 
application, acceptance and approval procedures into the Site Plan regulations, the Planning Board may 
delegate some Site Plan approval hearings to a committee of qualified administrators. The rights of the 
applicants and the abutters will be the unchanged as the hearings will be warned, the abutters notified and 
the hearings will be subject to public hearing procedures including minute taking. An appeal of the 
Committee's decision may be made to the Planning Board by the applicant or abutters. All of the 



165 



applications are reviewed by the Planning and Zoning staff and the Planning Board wishes to be able to 
delegate "minor Site Plan" approvals to the staff or other qualified administrators." 

Moderator Nelson asked for additional discussion. 

Robert Morris stated that he feels that this Article is disastrous. He wants to make sure that the people 
making the decisions are qualified to do so. 

Winifred Stearns, 5 Dorrance Place, felt that this Article provides an extra level of bureaucracy. She felt 
that this was more of a stalling tactic and that there would be employees with conflicts of interest. The term 
"minor" is of concern. Vice Chairman Connolly stated that the parameters regarding a minor subdivision or 
site plan review have not yet been set. Ms. Stearns felt that there were a lot of unanswered questions 
regarding the setting of the parameters and this could become a slippery slope. She felt that this would also 
create a large expense and questioned whether Minutes would be taken and at what cost. 

Ms. Griffin noted that the Article came at the suggestion of the Planning Board. She also stated that the 
Planning Board is very busy and this would streamline the process for the smaller projects with a minor site 
plan review. There have been complaints about the wait on the Planning Board agenda for the smaller 
projects. Town Staff knows the regulations and has a feel for the Planning Board's past decisions. The 
appeal is in place in case the applicant doesn't agree with the Staff decision. She felt that 9 times out of 10 
the applicants will be happy. 

Ms. Stearns was concerned about what would happen if someone wasn't happy with the outcome of the 
review and she doesn't feel that it's workable. She also questions the possibility of a conflict of interest. 

Vice Chairman Connolly stated that the appeals would go directly to the Planning Board. 

Rich Howarth questioned how this would work. Would an appeal be an issue of fact or would it be about 
interpretation of the ordinance? 

Vice Chairman Connolly stated that this amendment allows the Planning Board to set up the process. She 
presumed it would be treated like any other Planning Board case on the basis of the law. 

Bob Russell stated that he is in favor of this because he feels that the majority of the time, there would not 
be a problem. If there was a problem, it would go back to the Planning Board. Mr. Russell called the 
question. This was SECONDED from the floor. The audience unanimously agreed to end the discussion. 

The motion PASSED and Article Fifteen was ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE SIXTEEN: Shall the Town vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 36-A: 4-a, I (b) to authorize 
the conservation commission to expend funds for contributions to 'qualified organizations' for the purchase 
of property interests, or facilitating transactions related thereto, where the property interest is to be held by 
the qualified organization and the town will retain no interest in the property? 

Selectman Baschnagel MOVED that the Town vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 36-A: 4-a, I (b) to 
authorize the Conservation Commission to expend funds for contributions to 'qualified organizations' 
for the purchase of property interests, or facilitating transactions related thereto, where the property 
interest is to be held by the qualified organization and the town will retain no interest in the property. 
Chairman Walsh SECONDED the motion. 

Selectman Baschnagel stated that this is an opportunity for the Town legislature to give the Conservation 
Commission some additional authority. Currently, the Commission is charged with overseeing the Town 
lands and acquiring land within the Town for conservation purposes. They do not have the authority to 
assist in the funding of an outside agency, for example, Upper Valley Land Trust in purchasing a piece of 
property in the Town. Approval of this motion would give the Conservation Commission additional 
flexibility in how they go about facilitating the conservation plan. 

Moderator Nelson asked for further discussion. There was no further discussion. 

The motion PASSED and Article Sixteen was ADOPTED as written. 



166 



ARTICLE SEVENTEEN: Shall the Town vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 36-A:4-a, 1(a) to authorize 
the conservation commission to expend funds to purchase interests in land outside the boundaries of our 
municipality in contiguous municipalities, subject to the approval of the Board of Selectmen? 

Selectman Baschnagel MOVED that the Town vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 36-A:4-a, 1(a) to 
authorize the Conservation Commission to expend funds to purchase interests in land outside the 
boundaries of our municipality in contiguous municipalities, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Selectman Baschnagel stated that this Article would give the Conservation Commission permission to spend 
funds to purchase properties that are not within the Town of Hanover but adjacent to Town properties that 
they have interest in. 

Judy Reeves stated that the Conservation Commission would request a vote in favor on this Article. 

The motion PASSED and Article Seventeen was ADOPTED as written. 

Chairman Walsh asked that Selectman Bill Baschnagel come forward. 

Chairman Walsh noted that this was Bill's last meeting as Selectman and read the following statement: 

"This is both a sad moment and a time of celebration. It's sad because I'm going to miss Bill's sense of 
humor and his attention to both detail and the future. There are very few people that can look at both details 
and the future. And it's a time to celebrate, time to celebrate Bill's years on the Select Board and his long 
and continuing service to Hanover. Bill came to town in the late 1950's and fell in love with our Town. 

As a student, Bill was involved with the volunteer Fire Department in Town and the Dartmouth Outing 
Club. He went away and he served our country for a number of years but in the end, his love for Hanover 
drew him back. Bill has remained connected to our Fire Department and our emergency services, he often 
will report at Selectmen's meetings, recent activity on the scanner, for example. He has continued to 
connect with the land in a number of very helpful ways. I want to review quickly Bill's service to the Town, 
it's broad and it's deep. He was on the Building Code Advisory Board from 1984 to 1998; he was elected as 
a member of the Hanover Improvement Society in July of 2000 and became a Director in 2007 and has 
served as Secretary for a year; he was on the Affordable Housing Commission in 2003; his actions on 
Parking and Transportation in the Town and the region have touched virtually everything that has happened; 
Bill has been on the PTB from 1990 to 1993 and then 2000 to 2009 but the records might have been wrong 
and he's sure that Bill served from 1990 to the present. He was on the Parking Facility Task Forces and co- 
chaired one of them. He's been on the Advance Transit Board since 2003; he's been on the Upper Valley 
Transportation Advisory Committee from 2000 to the present and the Transportation Management 
Association Board since its inception. 

Bill has served as a Selectman to the Town between 2000 and 2009. He's been the Selectmen's 
representative to the Conservation Commission during that time as well as the Planning Board alternative. 
We, the people and the businesses of Hanover have been well served and owe you a debt of gratitude Bill, 
it's also time for you to have a proper place to rest and relax and reflect, thus we give you the chair." 
Selectman Baschnagel was presented with a chair from the Town of Hanover in appreciation to his years of 
service." 

Selectman Baschnagel stated that it has been a privilege and pleasure to serve the Town. He appreciates the 
Town's support over the years. It's the little things that make the difference and it has been fun to get to 
know the staff and the volunteers within the Town and they are the ones making the difference. 

ARTICLE EIGHTEEN: To see if the Town will vote to establish an Affordable Housing Commission, as 
a restructuring of the current Affordable Housing Commission, pursuant to RSA 673:1, II, which shall be 
constituted according to the provisions of RSA 673:4-c, RSA 674:44-h through j, and other pertinent New 
Hampshire Statutes which govern municipal commissions, their conduct, and their receipt of appropriated 
funds to carry out their charge; and to see if the Town will vote to establish an affordable housing revolving 



167 



fund, pursuant to RSA 31:95-h, according to terms and conditions to be determined by the Board of 
Selectmen. 

Selectman Christie MOVED that the Town vote to establish an Affordable Housing Commission, as a 
restructuring of the current Affordable Housing Commission, pursuant to RSA 673:1, II, which shall 
be constituted according to the provisions of RSA 673:4-c, RSA 674:44-h through j, and other 
pertinent New Hampshire Statutes which govern municipal commissions, their conduct, and their 
receipt of appropriated funds to carry out their charge; and to see if the Town will vote to establish an 
affordable housing revolving fund, pursuant to RSA 31:95-h, according to terms and conditions to be 
determined by the Board of Selectmen. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Robert Strauss, Chairman of the Affordable Housing Commission, stated that the current structure of the 
Affordable Housing Commission is as an advisory arm of the Board of Selectmen. They do not have the 
provision in their Charter to raise money for their own needs. The money they need would be used for 
studies needed within the Town. They have relied on other entities to fund the studies through money from 
the NH Housing Finance Authority. If this Article passes, the Commission could restructure and they would 
have the authority to go to the NHHFA themselves to obtain funding for projects within the Town. The 
name, however, will not change and they will remain the Affordable Housing Commission. 

The motion PASSED and Article Eighteen was ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE NINETEEN: To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a 
inter-municipal agreement by and among the Towns of Orford, Lyme, Hanover, Enfield, Springfield, 
Newbury, New London and Sunapee, to create a non-profit corporation to develop a broadband 
communications network, in accordance with RSA 53-A. 

Selectman Rassias MOVED that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a 
inter-municipal agreement by and among the Towns of Orford, Lyme, Hanover, Enfield, Springfield, 
Newbury, New London and Sunapee, to create a non-profit corporation to develop a broadband 
communications network, in accordance with RSA 53-A. Chairman Walsh SECONDED the motion. 

Ms. Griffin stated that the Town of Hanover has coordinated with seven other communities to form WCNH 
which stands for West Central New Hampshire in order to gain access to broadband in the outer reaches of 
the Town. In NH, municipalities cannot bond for broadband unless they are significantly underserved. In 
looking at possible funding, if they create an inter-municipal non-profit organization, they may be eligible 
for some funding for this project. This question was also on the March Town Meeting Warrants for the 
other seven towns and all of the communities voted to enter into the agreement. It would enable non-profit 
corporation to be able to receive money including donations to move forward to develop a broadband 
communications network. This is not something that is going to happen overnight. 

An audience member asked if the Town was going to be using Fairpoint Communications. Ms. Griffin 
stated that they could use any number of providers and Fairpoint could be one of them. 

The motion PASSED and Article Nineteen was ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE TWENTY: (Article by agency request) To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$1,650 to support the services provided for the residents of Hanover by the New Hampshire Association for 
the Blind. This is the third year this article has appeared on the warrant. 

Selectman Rassias MOVED that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $1,650 to support the 
services provided for the residents of Hanover by the New Hampshire Association for the Blind. This 
is the third year this article has appeared on the warrant. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the 
motion. 

Selectman Rassias explained that after three years on the Warrant, the request would then become part of the 
budget that comes before the Select Board. 



168 



Moderator Nelson asked if there were any representatives from the NH Association for the Blind that would 
like to speak to the Article. There were no representatives and no discussion. 

The motion PASSED and Article Twenty was ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-ONE: (Article by agency request) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $627 to support the services provided for the residents of Hanover by Tri-County Community 
Action Project (Tri-County CAP). This is the third year this article has appeared on the warrant. 

Selectman Rassias MOVED that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $627 to support the services 
provided for the residents of Hanover by Tri-County Community Action Project (Tri-County CAP). 
This is the third year this article has appeared on the warrant. 

Moderator Nelson asked if there were any representatives from Tri-County CAP that would like to speak to 
the Article. There were no representatives from Tri-County CAP. 

Bob Russell asked how the amounts are chosen for each agency. Selectman Rassias stated that these 
amounts came forward at the request of the agency. Chairman Walsh clarified that the money amounts 
relate to the number of residents that are served and the costs of the services that they provide. After three 
years, the agencies are included as part of the budget and are not brought forward individually. 

Another audience member voiced her support of Tri-County CAP and acknowledged the work and the 
demand for the need. She suggested that this stay on the budget year after year. 

The motion PASSED and Article Twenty-One was ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-TWO: (Article by agency request) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $550 to support the services provided for the residents of Hanover by the Court Appointed 
Special Advocates (CASA). This is the second year this article has appeared on the warrant. 

Selectman Rassias MOVED that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $550 to support the services 
provided for the residents of Hanover by the Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). This is the 
second year this article has appeared on the warrant. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED. 

The motion PASSED and Article Twenty-Two was ADOPTED as written. 

ARTICLE TWENTY-THREE: (Article by agency request) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $3,410 to support the services provided for the residents of Hanover by the Outreach House. 
This is the second year this article has appeared on the warrant. 

Selectman Rassias MOVED that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $3,410 to support the 
services provided for the residents of Hanover by the Outreach House. This is the second year this 
article has appeared on the warrant. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Susan Shinn stated that she is not a resident of Hanover but the Administrator of Outreach House. Outreach 
House was founded in 1991 and opened in 1997 through the work of a group of Hanover residents 
concerned about the lack of affordable housing that could provide care for senior adults in the Upper Valley. 
Located on South Park Street across from the Dartmouth Athletic facilities; they provide daily supportive 
residential care for 9 older adults and their mission is to provide a loving, caring, supportive, and 
comfortable family living environment in an affordable and attractive setting that enhances independence. 

Ann Chamberlain provided testament to the fact that her 95 year old mother loves it at Outreach House and 
encourages support of the Article. 

Kim Perez thanked the Select Board for increasing funding for the social service agencies across the board 
in this budget. She noted that Outreach House raised money for an energy audit and noted that there would 
be future fundraising taking place. 

The motion PASSED and Article Twenty-Three was ADOPTED as written. 



169 



ARTICLE TWENTY-FOUR: To transact any other business that may legally be brought before this 
Town Meeting. 

Selectman Rassias MOVED that the Town vote to transact any other business that may legally be 
brought before this Town Meeting. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Tim Pillsbury stated that he would like the Town to encourage organizations from the social service 
agencies to send representatives to speak about the services that they provide to the Town and why the 
residents should fund them. 

Moderator Nelson thanked the audience members for attending. 

Chairman Walsh MOVED to adjourn Town Meeting. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the 
motion. 

THE MEETING WAS ADJOURNED AT 9:45 P.M. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Charles Garipay, Town Clerk 
Minutes prepared by Elizabeth S. Rathburn 



2009 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
TOWN OF HANOVER 

Tuesday, October 27, 2009 
Hanover High School Gymnasium 

The Special Town Meeting of the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire convened on October 27, 2009 at 7 
p.m. by Moderator Pro Tempore Harry Bird. Moderator Bird gave an overview of the voting procedure and 
announced that Articles One and Two would require a ballot vote. Moderator Bird stated that while Article 
Three, in theory, could be a voice vote, he is aware that there will be a motion from the floor to have a ballot 
vote. Moderator Bird suggested having Town Meeting discuss the Articles and then have one vote for all 
three after the discussion. 

Moderator Bird asked for Chairman Walsh to make a motion. 

Chairman Walsh wanted to thank Moderator Bird for providing his services for this Special Town Meeting. 

Chairman Walsh MOVED that voting under Articles 1, 2 and 3 commence immediately after 
discussion has concluded and the question has been called on all three articles. Voting will be by 
separate YES/NO paper ballots for each article that will be marked by the voter and each deposited 
into separate ballot boxes. Ballots will be issued by ballot clerks as voters present themselves at the 
checklist. Voting will continue at this meeting for at least one hour and until all present who wish to 
vote have voted. The ballot boxes will then be sealed and kept in protective custody until tomorrow 
morning, Wednesday, October 28, 2009. Voting will then continue from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. at 
this same meeting location. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Kim Perez asked if any changes made to the warrant would be made part of the vote tomorrow. Moderator 
Bird stated that any amendments to a warrant article would be made from the floor and must be disposed of 
before they call the question on the warrant article. Moderator Bird further clarified that, if passed, the exact 
amendments would be posted on the voting booths so that it is clear what the residents are being asked to 
vote on. 

THE TOWN MEETING VOTED UNANIMOUSLY IN FAVOR OF THE MOTION. 

Moderator Bird asked for a motion for Article One. 



170 



Chairman Walsh MOVED ARTICLE ONE: That (he Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$8,570,916 through the incurrence of indebtedness in accordance with the provisions of the New 
Hampshire Municipal Finance Act, RSA 33 by the Town's assumption of the two existing loans 
originally made to the Hanover Water Works Company through the New Hampshire Department of 
Environmental Services Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund (NH DES DWSRF), which 
assumption has been consented to by NH DES DWSRF; and to take all action as may be necessary to 
carry out the purpose of this vote. Although this debt will be a general obligation of the Town, it is 
intended and expected that funding for the debt service associated with these loans will be paid 
exclusively by water rates collected from users of the water utility. A two-thirds ballot vote is 
required. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Chairman Walsh asked Betsy McClain, Finance Director, to speak to the details of the motion. Ms. 
McClain made the following statement: 

As part of the Purchase Agreement between the Town of Hanover and the Hanover Water Works Company, 
all of the physical operating assets (such as the filtration plant, storage tanks, reservoirs and dams, the 
distribution system, etc.) will be transferred to the Town. Along with the transfer of these assets, the Town 
will also assume the outstanding balance of debt associated with the original acquisition of these assets. 
Articles #1 and #2 request that Town Meeting authorize the Town to take on this debt. 

State law requires that all articles appearing on the warrant which propose the issuance of debt in amounts 
greater than $100,000 must appear first on the warrant. Consequently, Town Meeting Articles #1 and #2 
come before the "star of the show" - Article #3, the general warrant article addressing the Municipalization 
of the water utility. Certainly, no Hanover Water Works Company debt would be assumed by the Town if 
Warrant Article #3 is defeated. 

With that as general background, Warrant Article #1 requests Town Meeting authorization for the Town to 
assume the two existing Water Company loans issued through the New Hampshire Department of 
Environmental Services Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund. The New Hampshire Department of 
Environmental Services knows that the Hanover Water Works Company is considering a transfer of its 
operating assets to the Town and has consented to the transfer and the subsequent reassignment of the 
existing Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund loans. 

Some background on these specific loans: 

On May 3, 1999 the Hanover Water Works Company executed a $4,035,000 loan agreement for the 
upgrading of water distribution mains. Under the terms of the current loan agreement, this principal is 
payable over 20 years at an annual, fixed interest rate of 3.800%. The outstanding principal balance on this 
loan at June 30, 2010 will be $2,713,845. 

On April 26, 2005 the Hanover Water Works Company executed an agreement to borrow $6,493,081 for the 
construction of the water filtration plant on Grasse Road and a water storage tank. Under the terms of the 
current loan agreement, this principal is payable over 20 years at an annual, fixed interest rate of 3.352%. 
The outstanding principal on this loan at June 30, 2010 will be $5,857,071. 

These two outstanding principal balances at June 30, 2010 equal the amount cited in this warrant article, 
$8,570,916. 

The principal and interest costs associated with this debt are already built into the existing water rates. All 
costs associated with these loans will be borne exclusively by users of the water utility. 

Moderator Bird asked for further discussion. 

TOWN MEETING VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO END DISCUSSION ON ARTICLE ONE AND 
PROCEED TO VOTE BY SECRET BALLOT (AT THE END OF THE EVENING'S FULL 
DISCUSSION AS DETERMINED EARLIER). 

Moderator Bird announced that discussion on Article One was now closed and asked for business under 
Article Two. 



171 



Chairman Walsh MOVED ARTICLE TWO: That the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$550,000 relating to the Town's assumption of an existing debt obligation of the Hanover Water 
Works Company currently held by Citizens Bank; and to authorize the Town to refinance this debt 
(and any related prepayment fees) through the issuance of not more than $550,000 of bonds and notes 
in accordance with the provisions of the New Hampshire Municipal Finance Act, RSA 33; and to 
determine the rate of interest thereon as shall be in the best interest of the Town; and to take all 
action as may be necessary to carry out the purpose of this vote. Although this debt will be a general 
obligation of the Town, it is intended and expected that funding for the debt service associated with 
this loan will be paid exclusively by water rates collected from users of the water utility. A two-thirds 
ballot vote is required. Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Chairman Walsh asked Betsy McClain to speak to the details. 

Ms. McClain made the following statement: 

Warrant Article #2 requests Town Meeting authorization for the Town to refinance an existing Hanover 
Water Works Company commercial loan issued through Citizens Bank. 

On June 14, 2005 the Hanover Water Works Company refinanced $854,000 of its existing debt held by 
Citizens Bank. This debt was originally issued to construct an addition for the Grasse Road office building, a 
standby contact tank, and for equipment related to a previous water treatment process. The interest rate of 
the refinanced loan floats at 1.500% above the one-month LIBOR (the London InterBank Offered Rate, a 
standard financial benchmark). Interest rates during 2008 were as high as 6.530%. The outstanding principal 
balance on this loan at June 30, 2010 will be $495,600. 

This existing debt must be refinanced as the existing loan relates to assets to be transferred to the Town, and 
the loan is collateralized by a mortgage on the Hanover Water Works real property, only a portion of which 
will convey to the Town through Municipalization. Due to the particular structuring of this loan, there will 
be a prepayment penalty with the refinancing of this debt. The exact amount of the penalty will not be 
known until the time of the loan closing as its calculation uses the prevailing LIBOR rate. The warrant 
article anticipates a worst-case scenario of a $54,400 prepayment penalty. 

The outstanding principal balance at June 30, 2010 of $495,600 plus the worst-case scenario for the 
prepayment penalty of $54,400 equal the $550,000 which appears in this warrant article. 

The prepayment penalty will be significantly offset by projected savings achieved by the Town's refinanced 
loan at a fixed interest rate lower than the current rates being charged. 

If passed, Warrant Article #2 will authorize the Town to refinance this Hanover Water Works Company loan 
as a general obligation of the Town which will be paid exclusively by the customers of the water utility. The 
principal and interest costs associated with this debt are already built into the existing water rates. All costs 
associated with this debt will be borne exclusively by users of the water utility. 

Moderator Bird asked for further discussion. There was no further discussion on Article Two. 

TOWN MEETING VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO END DISCUSSION ON ARTICLE TWO AND 
PROCEED TO VOTE BY SECRET BALLOT (AT THE END OF THE EVENING'S FULL 
DISCUSSION AS DETERMINED EARLIER). 

Moderator Bird announced that discussion on Article Two was now closed and asked for business under 
Article Three. 

Chairman Walsh MOVED ARTICLE THREE: I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$1.00 for the purchase of the water utility assets owned by the Hanover Water Works Company, to 
include the water treatment plant, related water storage tanks, pump stations, distribution system, 
three (3) reservoirs, sufficient land within 250 feet around Reservoirs #1 and #2, all of the land around 
Reservoir #3, sufficient adjacent land to allow future expansion of the water treatment plant and 
storage tanks, and any other water utility assets required for the treatment and distribution of water, 



172 



as allowed by RSA 38:2-a, and which is in the public interest, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to negotiate and execute all documents required to complete the transaction as proposed. The 
remainder of the land which will not be transferred to Town ownership as part of this transaction will 
remain with the Hanover Water Works Company, and the Town's ownership share of that company 
will increase from the current 47.2% to 50% as part of the approved transaction. All of the related 
transactions shall occur on or about July 1, 2010. Completion of the transaction will be dependent 
upon the passage of special State legislation to enable the municipal water utility to continue to make 
semi-annual property tax payments to the Town, School Districts and County. Vice Chairman 
Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

Moderator Bird invited Selectman Christie to make his presentation to Town Meeting. 

Selectman Christie welcomed the audience members of Town Meeting. Selectman Christie made the 
following statement: 

About a year ago the Town approached the College to explore the Town's interest in Municipalizing 
Hanover's water supply. The College was supportive and last May at Town Meeting the Board of Selectman 
was authorized to proceed and to call a Special Town Meeting which is where we find ourselves tonight. 

Back in May we had a broad concept, no documents, but some ideas and requirements for moving towards 
Municipalization. So we arrive here tonight with more meat on the bones asking Town Meeting to 
"authorize the Board of Selectman to negotiate and execute all documents required to complete the 
transaction as proposed." 

Since last May, a combined Town/College Task Force has worked to create the documents taking into 
consideration all of the input from numerous public hearings, informational sessions and last May's Town 
Meeting itself. 

Task force members have been myself, Julia Griffin, Jay Pierson (current President of the Hanover Water 
Works Company ("HWWC"), former Selectman, and CPA by training and practice). Representing the 
College: Bob Donin, General Counsel; Paul Olsen, Director of Real Estate; and Peter Glenshaw, Director of 
Community Relations. 

I have organized my presentation into three parts: 

1) Making the case for Municipalization. 

2) Land management and governance issues. 

3) I will address concerns that have been raised in letters to the Valley News and a flyer that has been 
widely disseminated. 

Let's get started and I do apologize to those who have heard parts of this presentation before. 

I have been told by many that this proposal is "very complicated." My view is that while some of the details 
of specific agreements can appear complicated, the overall concept of what is being proposed and what we 
are trying to accomplish is relatively straight forward. 

My objective tonight is to simplify what I can so that everyone has a good understanding of the big picture. 
If history repeats itself there will also be lots of detail questions, but it is my hope that we will not lose sight 
of the forest as we discuss the trees. 

Current vs. Proposed 

• Water is currently supplied by the Hanover Water Works Company (HWWCo) - the proposal would 
change the supplier to the Town of Hanover. 

• Rates are currently set by the Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The proposal would change this to 
the Board of Selectmen. 

• Operations Managed by Hanover Town Staff- this would remain the same. 

• HWWCo is owned by the Town (47.2%) and Dartmouth (52.7%). The proposal would change the 
ownership to 50.0% each. 



173 



Why Municipalization? 

• Realization of $ 100,000 in savings/year on a $2,000,000 operating budget (5%). 

• Ability to establish capital reserves for future system improvements. 

• Access to lower cost bond financing, if needed. 

• Lower water rates over the long-term. 
Key Provisions of Municipalization 

• Town to acquire operating assets and some land for $ 1 .00 

Reservoirs and dams 

Filtration plant 

Water storage tanks 

Distribution system 

Land under hard assets and 250 feet around reservoirs 

• Town to assume bond debt associated with these assets. 

• Town to assume the financial assets and liabilities of the HWWCo. 

• Town to establish a separate enterprise fund similar to the Water Reclamation Fund. 

• HWWCo to become purely a land holding company. 

• Town ownership will increase to 50%. 
Other Impacts 

• No impact on current water rates - savings applied to capital reserves. 

• Favorable impact on future rates due to reserve funds and access to lower cost borrowing. 

• No impact on General Fund. 

Let's turn our focus to land management. Two major questions came out of Public Hearings and Town 
Meeting: 

1) "Why are you separating the reservoirs from the watershed?" Environmentally they are a package. 

2) "Why doesn't the Town either own all the land or have a conservation easement on it?" 

On the first, we tried hard to keep the watershed and the reservoirs together, but in the end could not. 

If Municipalization is to work financially, the HWWC has to get completely out of the Water Supply chain 
and the Town needs to own the reservoirs and dams in order to insure and maintain them. 

On the second question, additional Town ownership of land or a conservation easement on the land was 
never part of the original proposal to the College. 

When the Town approached the College to discuss Municipalization, we knew that in the past linking land 
use and Municipalization had prevented progress towards Municipalization so we stayed focused purely on 
Municipalization. 

The Select Board is comfortable that the HWWC has done a good job in managing this land for over 100 
years and has no intention of developing any of this land in the foreseeable future. 

If, at some time down the road, the land is not needed as watershed to protect the reservoirs, there will be a 
community wide debate on how best to use the land with all interests, including the conservation interests, at 
the table. 

Also, with the Towns new 50% ownership nothing can be proposed that is not supported by the Select 
Board, and should any changes require new zoning or the sale of the land, a Town Meeting vote will be 
required to make those changes. 
Land and Resources 

• Town to own reservoirs, 250 foot setback around reservoirs, and dams. 



174 



• HWWCo to continue to own roughly 1,164 (-80%) of the approximate 1,440 total acres currently 
owned by HWWCo. 

• No change in: 

Zoning 

Local/State/Federal protection of land 

What Happens to the Management of the Land not transferred to the Town ? 



Current 



Yes 



No 
No 



HWWCo. 
Yes 

47.2% 
No 
No 



Yes 



Land managed by Renamed HWWCo? 

Name of Company? 

Private company? 

What is the percentage of Town ownership? 

Subject to Public Process (Right-to-Know)? 

Open Director's Meeting? 

Open Annual Meeting? 

Company By-Laws re: Watershed Protection? 

Town Directors appointed by Select Board? 

Number of Town-appointed Directors 4 of 9 

Sale of Land subject to Town Meeting approval? No 

Rezoning of Land subject to Town Meeting approval? Yes 

Required Approvals : 

• Special Town Meeting 

- Tuesday, October 27 th - 7:00 p.m. - HHS Gym 

- Potential all day voting on Wednesday, October 28 th 

Trustees of Dartmouth College 
State Legislation 2010 Legislative Session 
NHPUC 

Hanover Board of Selectmen Approval of Final Documents 
Supporting Documents : 



Proposed 
Yes 

Trescott Co. 
Yes 
50.0% 
No 
No 
Yes 
Yes 

Yes 
3 of 6 
Yes 

Yes 



Letter of support from Dartmouth College 

Purchase Agreement 

Projected Budgets for Municipal Water Utility and the Land-Holding Company 

Agree-upon Procedures Report from Financial Auditors 

Financial Issues Memo 

Amended Articles of Incorporation 

Stock Transfer & Corporate Restructuring Agreement 

Draft Special Legislation 

Draft Rate Agreement 

Amended and Restated By-Laws of the Land-Holding Company 



175 



• 2009 Engineering Assessment 

• 2002 Water Supply Treatment Study 

• 1 997 Engineering Assessment 

Summary: 

Municipalization will result in: 

• Annual cost savings of $ 1 00,000 

• Ability to create capital reserve funds 

• Access to favorable municipal borrowing rates 

• Increased Town ownership of Land Holding Company from 47.2% to 50% 

I would now like to turn my attention to some of the concerns that have been recently raised in the Valley 
News and via a flyer. 

Last May the Town Meeting vote stated that "the final transfer agreement between the Town and the 
Hanover Water Company to acquire assets will be brought before the Special Town Meeting." 

First, let me clarify that the transfer agreement has also been called the Asset Purchase Agreement or simply 
the Purchase Agreement in the list of documents provided. It does NOT include the HWWC revised By- 
Laws or Articles of Incorporation or any of the other documents provided for your information. 

The reason the Purchase Agreement is marked DRAFT is because to arrive at a "final" document, we came 
to realize that we had a number of tasks still to complete such as obtaining a survey, obtaining subdivision 
approval, and preparing a definitive list of assets. Each will be either expensive and/or time consuming, and 
we didn't want to spend that money or time until we knew Town Meeting (and the Dartmouth Board of 
Trustees) had approved the basic transaction. We also recognized that any one of these steps might result in 
a wording change or some technical amendment to the draft. If we had presented the Purchase Agreement 
to Town Meeting as "final" and then found it necessary to make changes, the validity of the Town Meeting 
vote could be called into question. Therefore we marked it "draft." 

Having said that, the Select Board represents to Town Meeting that there will be no substantive changes to 
the Purchase Agreement. If any changes are made, they will be solely of a technical nature. 

As mentioned previously, the final Purchase Agreement will be adopted by the Select Board only after a 
public hearing. 

The flyer also asserts that there is, and I quote: "little clarity about how the town's interests will be 
represented on the new company, appointments to the Board of Directors or transfer of land. " 

I would like to address each of these. 

First: There is no "new" company per se - just the Hanover Water Works Company assuming a new name 
and using this opportunity to restate its bylaws and articles; 

Second: The Town's interests will be represented by three Directors appointed by the Select Board. We 
have said that we do not plan to appoint any member from any special interest group but rather will most 
likely appoint generalist as we have done historically. 

Third: The purpose of the renamed Water Company is stated in their Amended Articles of Incorporation 
which state: 



176 



"The purposes of the Company are to hold certain lands within the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire, a 
portion of which is within the watershed of the three reservoirs that supply the Town of Hanover with water 
for drinking, domestic, fire and other purposes, 

to regulate and manage the use of such watershed land for the protection of the water supply function of the 
reservoirs and associated land; and to protect and promote sustainable growth and management of the forest 
on said lands for timber production. 

In conducting its activities, the Company will comply with all applicable federal, state and local laws and 
regulations pertaining to water quality and watershed protection, as they may be amended from time to 
time." 

Fourth: We agree with the flyer that more needs to be done relative to assuring that the sale of land will 
require Town Meeting approval. This came into focus at the informational session in Etna, and the Task 
Force has been working on the issue. At a subsequent meeting the Task Force agreed that improvement was 
needed and proposed language to button this down. 

The proposed language will add a new section 2.11 in Article II of the Trescott Company By-Laws to read 
as follows: 

Section 2.11 Actions Requiring Shareholder Approval. Notwithstanding any other provision of 
these bylaws, shareholder approval shall be required for any sale, lease, or mortgage of corporation property 
or assets. 

We are having that solution reviewed by the Town's attorney to make sure it works. We believe that by 
requiring the stockholders to vote on the sale of land (i.e., the Select Board in the Town's case) and because 
the Select Board is not empowered to sell land by State Law without Town Meeting approval, we will have 
closed the loop. 

The flyer also suggests that Town Meeting vote to postpone the final vote until the May 2010 when the 
Transfer /Purchase Agreement will be final. 

Postponing until May will have several adverse consequences: 

There are several critical tasks that need to happen before we can close that we really cannot or should not 
proceed on without a final vote. 

We doubt that the State Legislature will act on our request for "payments in lieu of taxes" legislation that we 
discussed earlier before a final vote. This has the potential to delay the closing by one year, until June 
2011, because of the legislature's schedule. 

We cannot submit our request to decertify the current Water Company to the PUC until the Town has acted. 

We also do not want to spend the $40-$50,000 that a survey will cost before a final vote, and, without the 
survey, we can't go before the Planning Board for subdivision approval. 

Final completion of the loan transfer documents also requires final approval from the Town. Delay 
obviously means that we will not experience any of the savings as soon as we might otherwise and, of 
course, we still have the same problem of marking the Purchase Agreement final before doing all the things 
above as we have discussed. 

In addition, there is a momentum to any deal of this sort which you need to maintain and an opportunity cost 
of prolonging the Town's management attention to this. Murphy is always out there. We have a tough 
budget period ahead, and Julia and others need to focus elsewhere. 

I think I have gone on long enough, but lest we not forget why we are doing all of this: 

• Annual cost savings of $ 1 00,000 

• Ability to create capital reserve funds 



177 



• Access to favorable municipal borrowing rates 

• Increased Town ownership of Land Holding Company from 47.2% to 50% 
Selectman Christie thanked the audience for their patience. 

Moderator Bird asked for discussion on Article Three. 

Barbara Mcllroy MOVED to AMEND Article Three; to delete the phrase "and execute" and to add 
"and bring the final transfer agreement to the May 11, 2010 Town Meeting for a vote." The motion 
was SECONDED from the floor. 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT to Article Three: 

ARTICLE THREE: To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate $1.00 for the purchase of the 
water utility assets owned by the Hanover Water Works Company, to include the water treatment plant, 
related water storage tanks, pump stations, distribution system, three (3) reservoirs, sufficient land within 
250 feet around Reservoirs #1 and #2, all of the land around Reservoir #3, sufficient adjacent land to allow 
future expansion of the water treatment plant and storage \tanks, and any other water utility assets required 
for the treatment and distribution of water, as allowed by RSA 38:2-a, and which is in the public interest, 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all documents required to complete 
the transaction as proposed, and bring the final transfer agreement to the May 11, 2010 Town 
Meeting for a vote. The remainder of the land which will not be transferred to Town ownership as part of 
this transaction will remain with the Hanover Water Works Company, and the Town's ownership share of 
that company will increase from the current 47.2% to 50% as part of the approved transaction. All of the 
related transactions shall occur on or about July 1, 2010. Completion of the transaction will be dependent 
upon the passage of special State legislation to enable the municipal water utility to continue to make semi- 
annual property tax payments to the Town, School Districts and County. 

Ms. Mcllroy stated that the proposed changes to the by-laws mentioned tonight were not on the website so 
she did not have a chance to see them. Ms. Mcllroy stated that she has three main concerns and made the 
following statements: 

1) Last May, residents were promised that they would vote today on the finalized transfer agreement that 
would govern the new land-holding company. However, today they are being asked to give up that vote and 
give the Select Board authority to approve this agreement. 

2) The agreement is not finalized. The associated documents have some problems, and lack clarity. 

3) Residents need to know what the final document contain before we sign off on this project. 

For the past century, the town has been fortunate in the wise management of the infrastructure and 
watershed land, with a useful alliance of town and gown. 

Municipalization of the Water Company will offer several benefits for our town: a promise of lower rates for 
water users and an increase from 47% to 50% interest for the town in the new land-holding company. 
Therefore, we should be certain that this new company, with authority over 1100 acres of land, has the 
guidance that led the old water company through these last 116 years. 

At the May 12 Town Meeting of this year, the Select Board promised that the Town Meeting (we the voters) 
should have the opportunity to vote for the final transfer agreement at today's meeting. The transfer 
agreement mentioned in this amendment means the (Asset) Purchase Agreement which is now posted on the 
town's website. And this document references other documents, including the Articles of Incorporation and 
By-Laws that govern the new land-holding company. 

The Amended Articles of Incorporation in Section 7.9.3 and 7.9.4 of the Purchase Agreement to adopt the 
amendment restated by law, these exhibits are separately listed on the Town's website. She disputes the 
remark that the Purchase Agreement does not include these sections. 



178 



Today, we are being asked to transfer our vote to the Select Board, giving the Select Board the authority to 
execute these documents. This transfer is an extremely complex process. Julia Griffin has been particularly 
helpful and patient in answering my questions. When I asked her if the documents were finalized, Julia 
replied on October 19 th that the finalized documents would come to the Select Board for discussion later in 
the coming spring, with a public hearing and adoption by the Select Board. She said the Select Board 
hearing is when we would have a chance to discuss the final documents, and she specifically said that we 
would not discuss the documents at today's Town Meeting. I believe that this is the time to discuss them, so 
that we get things right for the Town's future. A vote by the Select Board is very different from a vote by 
Town Meeting. 

There seems to be some great urgency about going forward with the Municipalization, but if the transfer 
documents are not to be finalized until next spring, why not have the Select Board bring them to Town 
Meeting at that time? 

Ms. Mcllroy went onto her second point which is 'What is wrong with the Documents on the Town's 
Website?' 

If we adopt the proposed version of the Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws, this is what they currently say 
about how the matters of importance may come to the town's attention: 

• The purpose of the new company, as stated in the Articles of Incorporation has no responsibility 
towards water supply (as Town Meeting just heard, this has been changed and it is wonderful). 

• The land can be transferred or sold with the approval of the new Board of Directors, and the votes of 
the shareholders. 

• I have been told that the Select Board will 'vote the town's shares', but this is not specified in the 
Articles of Incorporation. 

• We (the voters) have been told at several public meetings that the sale or transfer of any of this land 
would come to Town Meeting for approval, but this is not specified in the Articles of Incorporation. 

• Thus, the proposed Articles of Incorporation, as they now stand, may authorize the Select Board to 
dispose of property, without a Town vote (as now is required). This wasn't a concern while the 
property was attached to the water supply. 

Here are still other questions about the documents that describe the governance of the new company: 

1. Appointments to the new Board : We have been told that the Select Board would appoint the town's 
three directors to the Board of the new company. If the Select Board is to appoint these directors, then 
the Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws should state this. 

2. How would these appointees operate in the Town's interest? There is no specificity in the documents 
that director's appointment would be dependent on taking direction from the Selectmen. If this is so, it 
should be stated in the Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws. 

3. Public review of the new corporation : The bylaws propose that there is an opportunity for the public to 
review the company's operations by attending an annual meeting that is open to the public, sometime 
between July 1 and September 30 th . That period covers the vacation time of many residents. 

4. 

Ms. Mcllroy's third concern is that the Town does the right thing. 

To be certain that the documents are written with specific and clear guidance for future town leaders, today 
we should amend Article Three as I propose, with this motion before you. To reject it means we will have 
lost a lot of bargaining power in hammering out the critical documents that govern the new land-holding 
company. 

Hanover is not the only party to this negotiation. In view of the Warrant Article last May, Dartmouth could 
argue that approval of an unamended Article Three today is tantamount to accepting the documents as 
posted now on the website. Then the Select Board may not be able to insert the promised revisions, despite 
their best intentions. 



179 



Ms. Mcllroy stated that it is her desire that the residents vote with full information on the finalized transfer 
document in May. 

Selectman Christie responded to the proposed amendment to the motion. He noted that the Select Board 
welcomes this motion to give Town Meeting the opportunity to decide if they had enough information to 
proceed to a yes or no vote or whether they wished to delay. He stated that the Board feels that they have 
lived up to the proposal made at Town Meeting. 

Kim Perez spoke in support of the amendment. She looked at the Minutes from the May Town Meeting and 
noted that there was discussion about having all of the final documents ready for the vote because they felt 
the devil is in the details. There are specific things not included such as the requirement of a Town Meeting 
vote for the land sale; changes in the Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws which should be brought to 
Town Meeting; the new company is not going to be a public company and therefore not subject to Right-to- 
Know laws. She wanted to speak regarding transparency of the governance. Process matters and she can 
think of no good reason why the meetings need to be done in private. The only way the public knows what 
is happening is by having access to the meetings and the Minutes. These laws require that notice of 
meetings be held and the Minutes be made available. As the documents are currently written, it is unclear 
whether the land-holding company would be subject to Right-to-Know laws. Ms. Perez stated that the 
watershed land would be the largest asset of the company. The Company should be required to operate in 
the open. 

Elsa Garmire asked what the options would be if Town Meeting did not vote in favor of this. She was 
disturbed to hear that the proposed changes were not on the website yesterday. She would like to know what 
they are actually voting on, if Town Meeting decides to vote. 

Selectman Christie responded by stating that they are voting first on the amendment. He stated that the 
purpose of the Hanover Water Works Company changes were made a while back. The proposed changes to 
ensure that any sale of the land would come before Town Meeting is before the Town's attorney awaiting an 
opinion and any changes made will not be material. 

Arthur Gardiner stated that he is not only a Hanover resident but an attorney and noted that having reviewed 
the website and documents, he was surprised at how very complete they are. There are several documents 
there and from his point of view, it gives the Town a lot of protection that the Town does not currently have. 
Today, the Hanover Reservoirs and forests are owned by a private company controlled by Dartmouth 
College and not the Town of Hanover. If, for reasons associated with their financial needs, Dartmouth 
College wanted to sell 1 ,000 acres around the reservoir, the Town could not currently stop this. Under the 
proposal negotiated, the Town can stop it. The Town would have veto power over the distribution of the 
land. Mr. Gardiner stated that the Board of Selectmen will be in the position to elect 3 members of the land- 
holding company; therefore the Town can stop any action that it wishes to stop. No action can be taken by 
this company without having both sides of this partnership agree to do so. He was a bit surprised that the 
Board felt that they needed to tie up the knot about control over the land by adding a new provision to the 
By-Laws because in reading the Articles of Incorporation on the website, you could not sell the land under 
the Articles of Incorporation. The Articles do not have the normal clause that states the corporation is 
empowered to take action which is consistent with the laws in the State of New Hampshire. 

Mr. Gardiner read the Purpose listed in the Articles of Incorporation: 

"The purposes of the Company are to hold certain lands within the Town of Hanover, New Hampshire, a 
portion of which is within the watershed of the three reservoirs that supply the Town of Hanover with water 
for drinking, domestic, fire and other purposes; to regulate and manage the use of such watershed land; and 
to protect and promote the sustainable growth and management of the forest on said lands for timber 
production." 

Under the Law of New Hampshire, if the Board of Directors of the Corporation did something other than 
permitted in that language, they would be personally liable for the consequences of those acts. This charter 
is a very carefully drawn and narrow statement, and it protects absolutely the environmental objective which 



180 



is to have the watershed protected over the long term. In order to change that, the Town would have to take 
action to amend the Articles of Incorporation and the only way to amend them is by a shareholder's voting, 
and there cannot be a majority vote without the Town agreeing to it. 

Mr. Gardiner stated that the question has been raised about how the Town is going to control what the 
Directors are doing. The way to control them is through the Board of Selectmen. Their duty is to represent 
the interest of the shareholders who vote them in. The mechanism established is a wonderful way to make 
absolutely sure the Town's interest is protected and he congratulated the negotiating team, and he hopes that 
the residents move forward with this. 

Monte Clinton supports Article Three and presented a petition to speak to the manner in which the vote will 
take place by request for a written ballot on the amendment. Moderator Bird received the petition with five 
names of voters present and confirmed them as being Kim Perez, Marilyn Hunter, Elsa Garmire, Bob 
Russell, and Augusta Prince. 

Dipankar Choudhury would like everyone to keep their eye on the big picture and ask whether the residents 
are trying to do the job that they have tasked the elected officials to do. He views that the residents govern 
through the Select Board. He has not heard any argument that negates the goal of the Board as presented by 
Selectman Christie. He asked how the residents are worse off with the proposal than they are today. He felt 
this has been an interesting process to watch. 

Hilary Pridgen felt that this amendment would provide an opportunity to re-write the By-Laws. She noted 
that she heard some excellent changes which have not been included on the website and would like to know 
what she is voting for. She would support the amendment. She would like to see the final version of the 
documents before the final vote. 

John Hochreiter spoke on behalf of the Finance Committee. He felt it was important to note that the Finance 
Committee has worked on this and have reviewed all of the audit information. There are savings involved 
and benefits to this transaction. The Finance Committee unanimously supports the transaction. 

Martha Solow supports the Select Board's proposal however, she would be unhappy to see it defeated by 
those who don't understand what's going on or those who may be confused about what has been presented 
tonight. She felt that there would be more voters tomorrow. She clarified that the amendment is to delay the 
vote by 6 months and the particulars would be the same and more information would be made available to 
the public. 

Dick Podolec agrees that the "devil is in the details" but they have the majority of the details, and he trusts 
the Select Board to do their job and work out the final details. He doesn't understand why they need final 
documents 7 months before the closing of the agreement. There are a lot of reasons why they can't delay 
this process unless they want to go through this again two years from now. He would like to see this go 
forward and take advantage of the savings. 

Bob Russell remarked that the prospect of the Town drawing up the agreement and not the Select Board 
would have this meeting go on forever. He would like to have the written ballot for the amendment so as 
not to influence people to vote based on others. 

Winnie Stearns stated that in her opinion, the deal to save $100,000 a year in taxes is a very poor tradeoff for 
taking on the responsibility of the water supply. She understands that no decisions can be made with regard 
to the land until it comes back before the Select Board. The only way to be sure the land could be saved is if 
it is placed in conservation. She also expressed her appreciation for all of the hard work done by the Board. 
She felt that the land would be developed if it is not protected which is the part that worries her the most. 
When these votes are taken to Town Meeting, all of the information is encapsulated in very few words, in 
one sentence asking for approval. Ms. Stearns also takes issue with the fact that the Minutes of the Planning 
Board are woefully inadequate so the residents are not aware of all of the issues. She also felt that it was 
very interesting that the Town approached the College about this issue. She thanked the Board for their 
work, but she is unable to accept the proposal as it stands. 



181 



Ms. Mcllroy wanted to respond to the gentleman who suggested that the residents would be asking to amend 
or draft the documents. She stated that if the land-holding company operated with noticed meetings open to 
the public and made their Minutes available, perhaps there wouldn't be the confusion here today. Those 
Minutes would clear up the confusion. She feels that the meetings should be open to the public which 
would eliminate some of the suspicion. 

Ian Simm stated that he supports the proposal. He recalls that at Town Meeting that State Law requires two 
votes: one at Town Meeting and one 6 months later. If the Town voted no, it is his understanding that the 
next vote would be in 2 years. He wanted to know if the amendment vote would place the Town in violation 
of that law. Moderator Bird's understanding is that the vote on the amendment would not violate the law or 
be subject to delay the main vote for 2 years. Town Attorney Walter Mitchell was in agreement with the 
Moderator's answer. 

Nancy Carter stated that this is an extraordinary opportunity for Town/Gown relations and wanted to point 
out that there are a lot of players in this and there are additional approvals. She requests that the body defeat 
the amendment and allow voters to go to the polls with the wording that has been well noticed. She truly 
believes that this is an idea whose time has come. 

Kim Perez stated that if the amendment fails, they have identified 3 important changes which the Select 
Board may or may not wish to include 1) requiring Town Meeting vote for any sale of land 2) requiring a 
Town Meeting vote for any changes to the Articles of Incorporation or By-Laws and 3) there is some 
evidence to require the company to follow the Right-To-Know laws. If the amendment is rejected, are they 
adopting the Articles as written? Can they make any of these changes? 

Town Attorney Walter Mitchell addressed some of the concerns brought forward. 

1. The fact that the documents are labeled draft; this is a very paper intensive transaction and in these 
types of transactions, there is always some tweaking done as they get closer to the closing of the 
agreement. In this transaction, when Mr. Christie said there would be no substantive changes, there 
will not be any changes that change the nature of the transaction. 

2. The land will not be able to be sold without the approval of the Town. If Dartmouth wanted to sell 
the land today, they have the power to do that. The College has agreed to increase the Town's 
ownership to 50% and allow them to stalemate any desire to sell the land. 

3. He also wanted to address the concern of the Right-To-Know law. The appeal was made to have 
transparency in the governance. This company is private now and in the future and is not subject to 
the Right-To-Know laws. The company could choose to do so but they are not held to it. Dartmouth 
College is currently the majority stockholder and is not inclined to agree to it. The issue has been 
brought up, and they have already agreed to some more openness. When Town representatives sit 
on the Board, they will obtain papers by the company. If those papers are turned over to the Town 
Manager, they become open to the public. 

Doug Mcllroy asked if the changes that have been described in the Articles of Incorporation have been 
approved by the negotiating team. Selectman Christie stated that the changes have been discussed and 
agreed to by the negotiating team. 

Linda Fowler is aware of the tradeoffs between having the citizens make laws or elected officials. She 
stated that if they defeat the amendment, the Town has received the message to continue tweaking the 
agreement. Since that is the case, she is prepared to vote against the amendment and she appreciated 
everyone's input and effort into the discussion of this proposal. 

Moderator Bird asked if Town Meeting was ready for the question. Town Meeting agreed to vote on the 
amendment at this time. Paper ballots were handed out and tallied. 
Moderator Bird called the meeting back to order. 

RESULTS: YES 31 NO 134 AMENDMENT FAILED 

Moderator Bird asked for a vote on the main motion by Selectman Christie. 



182 



TOWN MEETING VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO END DISCUSSION ON ARTICLE THREE AND 
PROCEED TO VOTE BY SECRET BALLOT (AT THE END OF THE EVENING'S FULL 
DISCUSSION AS DETERMINED EARLIER). 

TOWN MEETING UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED THE MOTION TO ALLOW ARTICLES ONE, 
TWO AND THREE TO BE VOTED ON BY PAPER BALLOT. 

Moderator Bird noted that the polls would be open for a minimum of one hour. Town Meeting discussion 
ended at 8:50 p.m., and the polls remained open for at least one hour after the vote. 

Moderator Bird closed the polls at 9:50 p.m. and asked for a motion. 

Chairman Walsh MOVED to suspend the Special Town Meeting until the following day, Wednesday, 
October 28 th , for the sole purpose of re-opening the polls at 7:00 am until 7:00 pm so that voters may 
continue to vote on the business of this meeting. The meeting will be adjourned on Wednesday 
evening after the polls close, the votes are counted and the results are announced by the Moderator. 
Vice Chairman Connolly SECONDED the motion. 

THE MOTION PASSED UNANIMOUSLY. 

Moderator Bird re-opened the polls at 7:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 28, 2009 at the Hanover High 
School. 

Voting ensued throughout the day. 

Moderator Bird closed the polls at 7:00 p.m. 

The results of the vote were tabulated by ballot clerks in attendance and announced by Moderator Bird: 

ARTICLE ONE 

RESULTS: YES 389 NO 30 (1 BLANK) 

TOTAL BALLOTS CAST 420 

REQUIRED TO PASS 280 

ARTICLE ONE PASSED 

ARTICLE TWO 

RESULTS: YES 380 NO 31 (1 BLANK) 

TOTAL BALLOTS CAST 412 

REQUIRED TO PASS 275 

ARTICLE TWO PASSED 

ARTICLE THREE 

RESULTS: YES 383 NO 38 

TOTAL BALLOTS CAST 421 

SIMPLE MAJORITY TO PASS 

ARTICLE THREE PASSED 

Vice Chairman Connolly MOVED to permanently dissolve the Special Town Meeting. Selectman 
Doherty SECONDED the motion. 

THE MOTION PASSED UNANIMOUSLY. 

Moderator Bird dissolved the meeting at 7:35 p.m. on Wednesday, October 28, 2009. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Minutes prepared by Elizabeth S. Rathbura 



Charles E. Garipay, Town Clerk 



183 



Notes... 



184 




2009 Pond Party 

Photo Credit: Parks and Recreation Asst. Director Liz Burdette 



ICE 
FISH 





Hanover Water Reclamation Facility 

2009 culminated with notification that the Hanover Water Reclamation Facility had received two 
prestigious awards. The first was the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Operation 
and Maintenance Excellence award. The second was the New Hampshire Chapter of the New 
England Water Environment Association's Operator of the Year award, awarded to Kevin 
MacLean, Hanover's Wastewater Treatment Superintendent. 




(Photo from left to right: Ed Rushbrook (Underwood Engineers, Inc.), Kristofer 
MacLean (Kevin's son), Kevin MacLean (Hanover Reclamation Facility 
Superintendent),Peter Kulbacki (Hanover Public Works Director), Julia Griffin 
(Town Manager), and Wes Ripple (NHDES)